STRENGTH IN NUMBERS

Strength in Numbers dedicated to my late mother Kay

* Welcome to Strength in Numbers *

“I swore never to be silent whenever and wherever human beings endure suffering and humiliation. We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented”

Quote from Elie Wiesel

 

A blog for you …

This is where you can have your stories published about the care you or your loved one have had while in hospital. This is where you can interact with others. This is where you can view helpful links, and news stories.

You can email me directly on joannaslater2@gmail.com  if you would like me to publish your story, your campaign, your website. You can also email me any helpful links which I can publish on the blog.

 

My Mother’s story

I self published a book called ‘The Last Six Months’ documenting every day of the six months when my mother Kay originally went into hospital for a routine hip operation. Whilst still in hospital sadly six months later she died after a series of tragic events.

Writing is very cathartic, and it helped me to release the sadness I had. The book also contains 50 more heartbreaking stories sent to me by my followers.

Buy on Lulu.com  http://goo.gl/tQpNsk  or Amazon Kindle  http://goo.gl/fGX0J0

Book cover

Twitter icon-twitter  @joannaslater

Facebook  sm_facebook_16x16 https://www.facebook.com/groups/joannaslater

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Filed under: Uncategorized

GREAT NEWS: My Notes Medical is now live and open for you to test

WITH YOUR HELP YOU WILL HELP US MAKE A MAJOR CHANGE IN HOW WE DOCUMENT OUR HEALTH CARE

We are currently looking for people only with “Android mobile devices” (phone or tablet) to use and test our app so MyNotes Medical will be the number one health documentation app available.

In exchange for your early feedback we will give you free access to all upgrades for life to the first 100 people.

Click on this link http://wp.me/P7C3OA-U  and please fill out the form to become one of our testers and information how to download.                              iOS (iphone) will come at a later date.

Together we can make a difference

Thank you so much, Joanna Slater

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Filed under: Uncategorized, , , ,

Document all your health issues for you and your loved ones. MyNotes Medical download today

WITH YOUR HELP YOU WILL HELP US MAKE A MAJOR CHANGE IN HOW WE DOCUMENT OUR HEALTH CARE

We are currently looking for people only with “Android mobile devices” (phone or tablet) to use and test our app so MyNotes Medical will be the number one health documentation app available.

In exchange for your early feedback we will give you free access to all upgrades for life to the first 100 people which will make you one of our founder members.

Click on this link http://wp.me/P7C3OA-U  and please fill out the form to become one of testers and information how to download.                             Phase 2 iOS (iphone) will come at a later date.

The MyNotes Medical program has been designed to help people protect and care for themselves, their loved ones and their patients (if they are carers or health practitioners.

Users of the app can do this by keeping and sharing accurate and accessible records of a person’s condition and treatment at the tap of a finger.

 TO TAKE NOTES

Recording robust written, audio and visual notes with the MyNotes Medical app enables patients to be more “informed, involved and engaged in getting better”.

The rich, chronological event log of text, audio, video and photo notes is automatically built and secured in a searchable format by the MyNotes Medical app.

Users of the MyNotes Medical app can easily add their personal information and details of treatment, medications and appointments

TO SHARE NOTES

MyNotes Medical users can easily refer to and share all of these details – including an accurate record of what was said, by whom and when – as treatment progresses.

TO RESEARCH HEALTH ISSUES

Between visits to the doctor or consultant, MyNotes Medical allows patients and carers to review and share recordings of the consultation/diagnosis with friends and family and to research vetted sites about related healthcare issues.

Together we can make a difference

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Thank you so much, Joanna Slater

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , ,

‘If you pay for a Mini you can’t expect a Ferrari’: Disgraced plastic surgeon told a mother-of-two it was HER fault after botching her £3,500 boob job

  • Alex Cater, 33, had surgery after 10st weight loss left her with sagging skin
  • Awoke from surgery in agony before her breasts started leaking puss 
  • Complained to surgeon Dr Amedeo Usai who asked ‘What did you expect from £3,500 surgery?’
  • He was struck off the medical register following a number of complaints

A mother of two who complained about her botched £3,500 boob job was horrified when her plastic surgeon told her -‘If you pay for a Mini you can’t expect a Ferrari.’

Alex Cater, 33, had gone under the knife after losing an incredible 10 stone having ballooned to a size 26 following the birth of her children Kayleigh, 13, and Cameron, 10. But instead of gaining her dream figure the surgery, carried out by shamed surgeon Amedeo Usai, went so badly wrong that her ‘butchered’ breasts were badly misshapen, painful and leaking puss. She eventually had to have the implants removed but said she still has both physical and mental scars that may never heal.

Dr Usai has now been struck off the medical register after a tribunal heard a series of complaints against him by patients.

Click on the link to read more

https://goo.gl/lPN8Xm

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She said she knew something was wrong after waking up from surgery in agony. But surgeon Amedeo Usai, who has since been struck off the medical register, dismissed her concerns with his brash comments.

Filed under: Named & Shamed, , ,

Boss of scandal-hit hospital with 287 unexplained deaths apologises for suffering patients endured

Libby McManus has issued the apology after taking over from former hospital chief executive, Julie Lowe

The new boss of a scandal-hit hospital where there were 287 unexplained deaths has apologised for the harm and suffering patients endured. Libby McManus was drafted in to run the North Middlesex Hospital in North London after a damning Care Quality Commission investigation uncovered a series of damning failures.

Among them was the case of a patient – who was found dead and with rigor mortis after being left for four hours in A&E. Inspectors also found evidence of elderly people suffering abuse, neglect and lack of fluids on wards for care of the elderly

Julie Lowe, the former chief executive of the North Middlesex has been moved on and been secretly found a new NHS job. In a meeting with The Sunday People Libby McManus said: “I want to apologise to all those relatives and patients who have suffered in the past. “We are starting to do things differently now and we are confident that in time we can turn things round.”

Mrs McManus also promised to look at some of the mortality data for the hospital highlighted by Professor Brian Jarman whose work exposed the scandal at Stafford Hospital where there were up to 1200 avoidable deaths. He said the failings at the North Middlesex had all the hallmarks of the harm and suffering experienced by patients at the Midlands Hospital.

An investigation by the People has found the Edmonton based hospital in breach of nearly a dozen laws designed protect the public following the Stafford Hospital scandal.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/north-middlesex-hospital-boss-apologises-8859750

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Libby McManus has taken over the Chief Executive role in the wake of the damning report

Filed under: Named & Shamed, NHS Blunders

They’re not bed blockers, just older people who want to get home

The NHS is faced with a rising tide of demand for care combined with a tight rein on both NHS and social care finances. The impact of these pressures is seen across the health and care system. It manifests itself obviously in delayed transfers out of hospitals.

Year on year these delays are rising, with more people staying in hospital when they don’t need to be there. It has an impact on the care of some of the frailest and most vulnerable people and is the subject of continued attention from the media, healthcare regulators and politicians. When media and commentators discuss this issue it’s only a matter of time before a certain horrible term is used – “bed blocker”.

The phrase “blocked bed” originated in the UK in the late 50s, driven by hospital clinicians’ concerns about a lack of beds. Its use grew between 1961 and 1967, when the elderly population increased by 14% while bed numbers remained static. In 1986 “bed blocking” made its first appearance in a British Medical Journal headline. Although it was not accepted as a medical term, by the 90s it was being widely used by health economists as a marker of inefficiency.

Click on the link to read more

goo.gl/kT9uSf

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Filed under: Elderly, , ,

Calls To Improve Diabetes Care As Amputations Hit Record High

Figures show some NHS trusts are 10 times likelier than others to resort to an amputation, even though 80% could be preventable.

The number of diabetes-related amputations in England has reached an all-time high of 20 a day, according to new analysis.

Diabetes UK says there is an alarming difference in quality of care seen across the country and while the best-performing areas have consistently reduced their amputation rates, the worst-performing areas have made no improvements. Experts estimate that up to 80% of diabetes-related amputations are preventable. Most are caused by foot ulcers, which are avoidable and easy to treat if detected early.

Using Public Health England figures, the charity discovered there are now 7,370 amputations a year – considerably more than the earlier figure of 7,042. Diabetes UK wants the Government and the NHS to improve diabetes foot care, especially in areas where amputation rates are stagnant or getting worse.

Data suggests some NHS trusts are 10 times more likely than others to resort to an amputation than others.

Click on the link to read more

http://news.sky.com/story/calls-to-improve-diabetes-care-as-amputations-hit-record-high-10557722

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NHS trusts in the red areas are up to 10 times likelier to resort to an amputation

Filed under: NHS, ,

New dementia training package for nursing staff by Steve Ford for Nursing Times

A free training package aimed at educating health and social care staff about dementia has been launched by Health Education England.

The training package  provides a basic introduction to dementia and how it affects people and their loved ones. It was launched today by Health Education England through a collaboration with the University of Bedfordshire, Oxford Brookes University, University of Northampton and University of West London.

The two-year project was commissioned by HEE’s Thames Valley branch, with the aim of improving professional knowledge, service delivery and provision for patients with dementia. Part of it included a review of existing dementia awareness training, with the findings then used to develop the subsequent training package.

Melsina Makaza, senior lecturer in mental health nursing and dementia lead at Bedfordshire, jointly led a pilot of the package involving 1,500 clinical and non-clinical staff from a variety of health and social settings in 2015. She said: “People often have this misconception that when someone gets dementia, that’s it, the person is gone. It’s sometimes seen as a death sentence. “But that’s not true,” she said. “The person is still there and we need to make sure health and social care professionals at every level know how best to help them in a person-centred way.”

Click on the link to read more

New dementia training package for nursing staff

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Filed under: Dementia,

Terminally ill actor Brian Rix calls for assisted dying law change

Terminally ill actor and disability campaigner Brian Rix, 92, has said the law on assisted dying needs changing.

Mencap president Lord Rix urged the speaker of the House of Lords to push through legislation allowing those in his situation to be assisted to die. He had previously opposed an assisted dying law, but said his illness has left him “like a beached whale” and in constant discomfort. “My position has changed,” he wrote to Baroness D’Souza.

Stage and TV actor Lord Rix, who specialised in post-war “Whitehall farce” comedies, is receiving 24-hour care in a retirement home.

Extract from Lord Rix’s letter

“My position has changed. As a dying man, who has been dying now for several weeks, I am only too conscious that the laws of this country make it impossible for people like me to be helped on their way, even though the family is supportive of this position and everything that needs to be done has been dealt with.

“Unhappily, my body seems to be constructed in such a way that it keeps me alive in great discomfort when all I want is to be allowed to slip into a sleep, peacefully, legally and without any threat to the medical or nursing profession.

“I am sure there are many others like me who having finished with life wish their life to finish.

“Only with a legal euthanasia Bill on the statute books will the many people who find themselves in the same situation as me be able to slip away peacefully in their sleep instead of dreading the night.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-37009758?

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Lord Rix opposed the Assisted Dying Bill in 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized,

Drug shortages are ‘harming’ patients, say GPs

Patients are coming to harm due to drug shortages, GPs have warned, as a GPonline survey revealed four out of five GPs were pushed to prescribe second-choice medicines in the last year due to shortages.

In the GPonline survey of 441 GPs, 82% said drug shortages had forced them to prescribe a second-choice drug in the past 12 months. Just 12% said they had not, while 6% indicated they did not know. One in five (18%) of the GPs who had prescribed a second-choice drug said that patients had gone on to experience negative effects as a result, including harm or slower recovery. Another 43% said they were not aware of any adverse effects, and 39% said they did not know.

Many GP respondents expressed their frustration at the situation, which several reported had happened on a number of occasions. One said a patient had suffered because the medicine they needed was not manufactured for a time. Another said that, while no patients had experienced major effects, ‘some have complained of increased side effects’.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/XyRHup

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Filed under: GP's, ,

Big rise in patients falling victim to NHS surgical mistakes

Health campaigners have blamed inadequate staffing and pressure in the NHS for a rise in the number of hospital attendances caused by “mistakes” during medical care.

Between 2005 and 2015, the number of attendances by patients caused by an “unintentional cut, puncture, perforation or haemorrhage during surgical and medical care” rose from 2,193 to 6,082. Peter Walsh, of the charity Action Against Medical Accidents, said that more complex procedures and better reporting of incidents could also partly explain the rise. “I suspect inadequate staffing and increased pressure at work are also factors,” he told the Daily Mail.

Mr Walsh said some surgeons were concerned that their training was not as thorough as it once was. He added: “Of course it is a known risk of surgery that these things happen, but that doesn’t make it OK and much of the time they are really bad errors that are perfectly avoidable. “One of the most common mistakes we hear of during laparoscopic surgery is perforation of the bowel. This is very, very serious and can be fatal if not repaired very quickly.” He also said the the increase was worrying and called for an investigation into its cause.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/08/23/big-rise-in-patients-falling-victim-to-nhs-surgical-mistakes/

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Filed under: Uncategorized

Whistleblowers being ‘blacklisted by NHS’ as staff records state they were ‘dismissed’ even after being cleared at tribunal

When Maha Yassaie began to suspect that a colleague was taking money from drug companies to prescribe a certain product and that a GP had obtained controlled drugs to attempt suicide she naturally raised the alarm. But after reporting these and other concerns about her colleagues the former chief pharmacist at Berkshire West Primary Care Trust was dismissed from her post. To her dismay Lady Yassaie was told by an internal inquiry that she was “too honest” to work for the NHS.

It should therefore have been a moment of vindication when she was awarded £375,000 compensation after the Department of Health was forced to admit to her that “the investigation and disciplinary processes… were, in some respects, flawed”.  Over the following four years, however, every one of Lady Yassaie’s attempts to find a new job met with failure, despite her experience and qualifications.

It was only when she obtained her staff record from the Department of Health that she discovered that officials had effectively blacklisted her in the eyes of prospective employers, by wrongly stating that she had been dismissed from her previous job.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/08/20/whistleblowers-being-blacklisted-by-nhs-as-staff-records-state-t/

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Jennie Fecitt was dismissed from her post as a senior nurse at a walk-in centre in 2010, after raising concerns about a nurse who had lied about his qualifications CREDIT: JON SUPER FOR THE TELEGRAPH

Filed under: Whistleblowing,

Cancer overtakes heart disease as No1 cause of death: Statins, healthier lifestyles and better treatment help cardiovascular deaths to plummet

  • Cancer overtakes cardiovascular disease as biggest killer for first time
  • People less likely to have heart issues and if they do more likely to survive
  • But cancer rates are gradually increasing as people live longer lives 

Cancer rates, meanwhile, are gradually increasing as people live longer and access to expensive new drugs are failing to keep up with demand. Researchers last night revealed that deaths from the disease had overtaken heart deaths among women in 2014 – the most recent data available – as it did for men in 2011. It means that for the first time cancer is the number one cause of death for the population as a whole.

Study leader Dr Nick Townsend said: ‘Fewer people are having a cardiovascular event and more are surviving them.  ‘We are seeing reductions in the causes of cardiovascular disease, with dramatic decreases in smoking rates in particular.’

There have also been big improvements in treatments, he said, with specialised heart units and use of stents in hospitals meaning people who do have heart attacks and strokes are more likely to survive. Dr Townsend, whose work is published in the European Heart Journal, said lifestyle factors – drinking, smoking, diet and exercise – have an impact on roughly 85 per cent of cases of cardiovascular disease. For cancer, lifestyle is responsible for between 40 and 50 per cent of cases, with the remainder caused by genetics and other factors.

This means that the improvements in lifestyle seen over the past 50 years in Britain have had a much bigger impact on heart disease than on cancer.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/xB6WEM

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Filed under: Cancer, ,

More than 50 allegations of ‘dirty practices’ against Nottinghamshire dentist

Former dentist Desmond D’Mello is facing more than 50 allegations of malpractice after causing the biggest NHS recall in history, it has been revealed.

The charges include not changing his gloves between patients and wiping his hands on his trousers; meanwhile his dental nurse also faces allegations including not changing her gloves after blowing her nose. More than 4,000 patients had blood tests to see if they had contracted any blood-borne viruses after it was revealed he had also flouted hygiene laws by failing to sterilise equipment.

Mr D’Mello was suspended in August 2014 after a whistleblower filmed him failing to change his gloves and not cleaning dental instruments between patients at his practice in Daybrook. The revelation led to the biggest recall in the history of the NHS, with 22,000 patients who had been treated by D’Mello over a career spanning 30 years offered blood tests to check for diseases such as hepatitis C.

Click on the link to read more

More than 50 allegations of dirty practices against Nottinghamshire dentist

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Desmond D’Mello

Filed under: Named & Shamed, NHS, ,

ITV Tonight is making a programme about the financial abuse of the elderly

Can anyone help? Please email: elaine.carlton@itv.com or phone 0207 157 4365

ITV

Filed under: Elderly,

Thousands of cancer sufferers surviving decades after diagnosis. Macmillan researchers say

More than 170,000 people diagnosed in the 70s and 80s are still alive in what Macmillan researchers say is an ‘extraordinary’ number

People are twice as likely to live at least 10 years after being diagnosed with cancer than they were at the start of the 1970s, new research shows. More than 170,000 people in the UK who were diagnosed in the 1970s and 1980s are still alive – an “extraordinary” number, Macmillan Cancer Support said in its report Cancer: Then and Now.

The increase in long-term cancer survivors is due to more sophisticated treatment combined with an ageing population, the charity said, acknowledging that there was still a huge variation in survival rates according to cancer type. But it warned the consequences were increasing demand on the NHS, with more people living for longer, with long-term side-effects.

The Macmillan chief executive, Lynda Thomas, said: “More and more people are being diagnosed with cancer and, in general, having a more sophisticated life with their cancer than perhaps they would have done. What we are now seeing is that lot of people are coming in and out of treatment, so all of that does put pressure on the NHS.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/aug/01/long-term-cancer-suvivors-nhs-macmillan-cancer-support-report

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The number of people living with cancer in the UK is set to grow from 2.5 million to 4 million by 2030. Photograph: Alamy

Filed under: Cancer,

Mother claims she has to restrain mentally-ill son, 24, with handcuffs due to ‘lack of support from NHS

A mother claims she has to put her mentally-ill son in handcuffs at home because of a lack of support from mental health services.

Joely Hignett alleges she has to physically restrain 24-year-old son Kyle Hignett – who has a borderline personality disorder and suffers from psychosis – to stop him from harming himself or others. The 44-year-old mother of two, from Warrington, Cheshire has released “distressing” footage of Kyle sobbing and screaming to raise awareness of his condition and said she feels “let down” by the mental health system.

She claims her son’s breakdown in the video, which has racked up more than 950,000 views and nearly 5,000 shares on Facebook, was caused by him being told by doctors he was soon to be discharged.

Ms Hignett, who is full-time carer to Kyle and 22-year-old daughter Tyler Hignett, who suffers from bipolar disorder, said: “I know my son is the most beautiful, kindest person in the world. “He is so respectful, he would never want to hurt anyone in the street. But when this thing takes over we have to put him in handcuffs to prevent him from killing himself or harming someone else. He gets in rages and feels extremely dangerous. “Luckily, thank God, he works with me. We just feel totally overwhelmed and scared, but no one seems to care.

“We feel the mental health system is letting my son down, his family down and everybody else down who suffers every day with mental health.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/07/25/mother-claims-she-has-to-restrain-mentally-ill-son-24-with-handc/

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Joely Hignett claims she has to physically restrain her 24-year-old son Kyle to stop him from harming himself or others

Filed under: Mental Health, ,

‘We were told not to pick a fight with the NHS’: Parents of three-year-old who died needlessly from sepsis were made to feel like the tragedy was ‘just bad luck’

  • Sam Morrish died at Torbay Hospital in South Devon in December 2010 
  • His parents took him to see health professionals four times in 36 hours
  • Initial investigation by health Ombudsman said death was avoidable
  • Parents called for a second investigation as questions were unanswered 
  • Second damning report ruled NHS organisations refused to accept blame 

The parents of a three-year-old boy who died needlessly of sepsis have told of how they were warned ‘not to pick a fight’ with the NHS. Sam Morrish succumbed to the illness in 2010 following a catalogue of failings by out-of-hours GPs, hospital doctors and NHS call centre staff.

A damning report into his death yesterday by the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman accused the NHS of failing to investigate mistakes and refusing to accept blame. His parents, Scott and Sue Morrish, who live in Newton Abbot, Devon, spoke of how they were made to feel the tragedy was bad luck.

The little boy – described as a ‘force of nature’- died in December 2010 just 36 hours after they first sought medical help. Over that time they were sent away and dismissed by GPs, hospital doctors and call centres at NHS Direct, which has since become NHS 111. An initial report by the Ombudsman in 2014 concluded that his death was avoidable and he would have been saved had doctors picked up on early warning signs.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/fhsHsa

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Three-year-old Sam Morrish died from sepsis in 2010 after a catalogue of errors by various NHS bodies. A damning report into his death today accused the NHS of failing to properly investigate the tragedy

 

Filed under: NHS Blunders,

5 News investigation: Failures in mental health trusts exposed

Channel 5 reports on our failing mental health trusts.
Three in the country rated ‘inadequate for safety’. 

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Filed under: Mental Health,

Doctors’ basic errors are killing 1,000 patients a month. Biggest ever study of errors in British hospitals finds one in ten patients affected

Almost 12,000 patients are dying needlessly in NHS hospitals every year because of basic errors by medical staff, according to the largest and most detailed study into hospital deaths ever performed in the UK.

The researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and colleagues found something went wrong with the care of 13 per cent of the patients who died in hospitals. An error only caused death in 5.2 per cent of these – equivalent to 11,859 preventable deaths in hospitals in England.

Helen Hogan, who led the study, said: “We found medical staff were not doing the basics well enough – monitoring blood pressure and kidney function, for example. They were also not assessing patients holistically early enough in their admission so they didn’t miss any underlying condition. And they were not checking side-effects… before prescribing drugs.”

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/FFgshf

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Kane Gorny’s mother Rita Cronin with her lawyer outside court PA

Filed under: NHS Blunders, ,

Pregnant mental health patient ‘pinned to floor’

A mental health trust has launched an investigation after a heavily pregnant patient was allegedly dragged from a seat and pinned to the floor by staff.

The woman was knocked face down to the floor by a male nurse in a psychiatric hospital, according to a witness. Three members of staff are said to have then held her down. The Central and North West London NHS trust said a member of staff had been removed from clinical duties while the incident was investigated.

The alleged incident occurred on the night of 10 July while a former adviser to the health secretary on patient safety was an inpatient at the unit. The former adviser, Alison Cameron, said that while the woman, who was eight and a half months pregnant, was being verbally aggressive she hadn’t made any physical threats.

“A male nurse came marching over from the treatment room to the dayroom,” said Ms Cameron.  “He was threatening the woman saying ‘If I hear your voice again, I will, I will…’ and without finishing his sentence, he physically manhandled the woman from her seat to the floor. Three other members of staff then pinned her down.” Ms Cameron, who has been a patient advocate for years, said the use of force was wholly unnecessary. “I know safe restraint, and this wasn’t it.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-36806300

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Filed under: Mental Health,

Government commits to high quality end of life care

Plans to ensure high quality, compassionate care for everyone at the end of life have been announced by Health Minister Ben Gummer.

The government has made 6 commitments to the public to end variation in end of life care across the health system by 2020. These are:

  • honest discussions between care professionals and dying people
  • dying people making informed choices about their care
  • personalised care plans for all
  • the discussion of personalised care plans with care professionals
  • the involvement of family and carers in dying people’s care
  • a main contact so dying people know who to contact at any time of day

The commitments are in response to an independent review of end of life care.

Click on the link to read more

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-commits-to-high-quality-end-of-life-care

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Filed under: Uncategorized

GP care plans to prevent hospital admissions not effective, warns CQC

The avoiding unplanned admissions enhanced service has not been effective, according to a report from the CQC.

GP care plans for older patients have ‘varied levels of detail’ and are not seen as an ‘effective document in the wider health and social care system’, a new report into health and care integration for elderly patients said. ‘The Building bridges, breaking barriers’ report looked at existing integration across health and social care and the impact this has on older people, and also noted that there was ‘very little evidence that GPs were sharing care plans with other providers’.

GPs interviewed as part of the research said the ‘resources they had available to respond to their patients’ health issues were insufficient and felt that they did not have enough time to implement tools and undertake care planning in a way that would be meaningful for all of their patients’, the report said. The report also gathered information from GPs about their views on standardised assessment tools and how they used them

‘Many GPs reported using the most commonly used standardised assessment tools. However, even among GPs who used these, some had reservations about doing so because they did not know whether they had been formally validated or accredited,’ said the report.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/zNPAGq

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Filed under: Uncategorized, , , ,

Listen to parents of sick children rather than tests, NHS tells doctors

New recommendations say medical staff must listen to parents who report their child is deteriorating, even if tests show no cause for alarm.

Doctors and nurses must listen to parents who report that their sick child is getting worse and investigate their concerns, even if the usual tests suggest there is no cause for alarm, say new NHS recommendations. NHS Improvement, which has reviewed the care of children who deteriorate while in hospital, says parents at the bedside are well placed to see any change in their child, but are not always heard and can be afraid to speak up.

Too often parents worry “about ‘time-wasting’ with any repeated concerns” or that they won’t be listened to, but “it is imperative that parents feel welcome and encouraged to speak up”, said Dr Mike Durkin, the NHS national director of patient safety. Children can deteriorate very quickly and die if they do not get the right treatment fast. Sepsis – blood poisoning – sometimes caused by meningitis, kills babies and children if they do not rapidly get antibiotics.

According to NHS Improvement, research shows that more than a quarter of preventable deaths in children and adults happen because they are not properly monitored so a change in their condition is not noticed.

Click on the link to read more

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/jul/13/listen-to-parents-of-sick-children-rather-than-tests-nhs-tells-doctors

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Filed under: NHS Blunders, , , ,

Church Crookham baby death sparks national review into care for newborns

15 years since the tragic death of their newborn daughter, Anne and Graeme Dixon have welcomed an investigation into the care of babies who need extra support.

A health watchdog has released the results of a national review into the care of newborns who need extra support, sparked by a Church Crookem  couple who tragically lost their baby. Anne and Graeme Dixon’s daughter Elizabeth was born at Frimley Park Hospital in 2000 and was brain damaged after her high blood pressure was not treated for 15 days.

She was left disabled and needed a tracheostomy, or tube, to breathe, but suffocated and died at home days before her first birthday when it was not maintained during a home visit by an agency nurse who transpired to be newly-qualified.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) investigation found there is a significant risk to hundreds of babies and children because of inconsistent practice and a lack of clear guidance on treatment. The watchdog said it has uncovered concerns about the way the NHS identifies and manages clinical risk in unborn and newborn babies.

In the first report of its kind, it also raises fears that key information might not be shared between clinical teams and says there needs to be more consistent support for families with children requiring long term ventilation at home. Among its recommendations for improvement, the CQC says every unborn fetus should be assigned a unique identification number to ensure important information from a mother’s clinical notes is properly transferred to the baby’s records after birth.

Click on the link to read more

Church Crookham baby death sparks national review into care for newborns

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Baby Elizabeth Dixon died in 2001

Filed under: NHS Blunders,

NHS plan to shut child heart surgery units causes outcry

NHS England defied as it seeks to boost surgeons’ skills with bigger pool of patients at fewer sites, shutting Royal Brompton, Leicester and Manchester units

Two large hospitals, the Royal Brompton in London and Glenfield hospital in Leicester, have defied plans from NHS England to close their heart surgery units for children. NHS England has tried to settle a bitter 15-year argument following the deaths of babies at the Bristol Royal Infirmary, whose heart surgeons were not as skilled as others elsewhere. The 2001 Kennedy review into the tragedy said some units had to close so that the remaining surgeons operated on enough tiny hearts to be as good as they could be at the complex procedures. But nobody can agree which units these should be.

The new review by NHS England says the units at Royal Brompton and Glenfield must child heart surgery. Both fought judicial reviews against earlier closure proposals and they appear prepared to do so again. The third hospital trust named was Central Manchester, which operates on children and adults born with heart defects.

Click on the link to read more

https://goo.gl/RFvswU

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Filed under: Hospital,

Care quality set to worsen this year, warn finance directors

More than one in five finance directors in the NHS in England believes that the quality of patient services will worsen over the coming year, while one in three thinks the decline will continue the following year as well.

The findings come from the latest biannual NHS Financial Temperature Check survey of around 200 finance directors in England in May-June this year, and published by the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA), which represents finance staff working in the NHS

For the third consecutive year, the financial performance of the NHS worsened, with NHS Trusts and Foundation Trusts reporting a deficit, and for the first time, CCGs also racking up an overspend in 2015-16. More than one in five finance directors (21% of CCG chief financial officer and 23% of trust finance directors) believes the quality of patient services will deteriorate this financial year, while one in three provider trusts anticipate quality will decline further next year.

The most vulnerable aspects of patient care include waiting times (76%), access to services (69%) and the breadth of services offered (61%).

Click on the link to read more

http://www.onmedica.com/newsArticle.aspx?id=c5f2b5b0-873f-4237-8fbb-13f72854a98b

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Filed under: Hospital,

Children’s hospital ‘let down by parents’

Following the Independent Review of Children’s Cardiac Services in Bristol, NHS England pledged to ensure that “a consistent level of care is available for every patient in every part of the country”.

Good Morning Britain…”We’re joined by Faye Valentine, whose son Luke passed away following a heart procedure, and Rachel Pacua, whose son Jack has been left with permanent brain damage after open heart surgery, both at Bristol Hospital.

We’ve been fighting for four years” – both mothers are demanding justice after the hospital admitted the failing was the fault of the staff, but only in private.

Click on the link to see the Good Morning Britain interview

http://www.itv.com/goodmorningbritain/news/childrens-hospital-let-down-by-parents

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Luke Jenkins died at Bristol Children’s Hospital

Filed under: NHS Blunders, Uncategorized, ,

Children let down by Bristol hospital’s ‘poor care’

Families at Bristol Children’s Hospital were let down by over-stretched staff and poor communication, according to an independent review of its cardiac service published today (Thursday 30 June).

It also found hospital management had been unnecessarily defensive in response to criticism, which had created an atmosphere of distrust between families and the hospital. The Bristol Review, commissioned by NHS England, was prompted by the unexplained deaths of ten children between 2012 and 2014. All of them had recently had cardiac surgery at Bristol Children’s Hospital.

The review found there had been an over-reliance on agency nursing staff, who lacked the skills to deal with such seriously ill children. Time was in short supply too; on occasion nurses were so rushed that parents had to remind them to serve their children meals.

Taking evidence from over 200 families, the review found that prior to a Care Quality Commission inspection in 2012, senior managers had no idea there were serious problems in the cardiac service.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.itv.com/news/west/2016-06-30/bristol-cardiac-review/?

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Report author Eleanor Grey QC and consultant adviser Sir Ian Kennedy.

Filed under: Uncategorized, ,

Family who lost son speak of ‘toxic culture’ at Bristol Children’s Hospital

Bosses at Bristol Children’s Hospital presided over a “toxic culture” in which risks were taken with children’s lives, according to the parents of a young boy who died following heart surgery.

Yolanda Turner accused the board of the University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust of overseeing poor standards in care on Ward 32 – a specialist cardiac unit – at Bristol Children’s Hospital. Her son Sean died aged four in March 2012 from a brain haemorrhage after previously suffering a cardiac arrest while on the ward following complex heart surgery.

Mrs Turner, from Warminster, Wiltshire criticised the trust ahead of the publication of the independent inquiry into cardiac services at the children’s hospital. “We hope that the Bristol Review will enable the trust board to be held to account for their failures to provide a service that fell well below acceptable standards,” she said.

“They were basically putting staff in a position of risk and safety and taking risks with children’s lives. The trust board will have to be held to account for that. “We’ve said all along this board has a very toxic culture and they are not open and honest with families and that all needs to change. “We are hoping that major changes will come about from the Review which will make that hospital a much safer place. “The whole purpose of our public fight and our campaign has been to ensure that changes are made and that no other child has suffer what Sean went through.

“It is important for us to be believed because we felt very much that we weren’t believed and people had that opinion that you lost a child so you are bitter and you want to blame somebody but that really hasn’t been the case at all. “We were frightened about what happened to Sean and we were afraid for other children that were using the unit and our fears have been proven because other children have now followed.”

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/WWXJe0

Steve and Yolanda Turner, the parents of Sean Turner, arrive at Flax Bourton Coroners Court, near Bristol. 13th January 2014. See SWNS story SWHEART; An inquest has started today into the death of a four-year-old boy who was being cared for at Bristol Royal Children’s Hospital. Spider-Man fan Sean Turner passed away on March 15, 2012, after a heart operation. Before the procedure the popular lad had excitedly told his friends doctors were going to “mend his heart”. For Sean’s parents, Yolanda and Steve, the agony does not ease but they are hoping the evidence heard at Flax Bourton Coroner’s Court will provide them with some answers about what, if anything, went wrong in the case of their beloved son. Sean was born with his heart on the right side of his body and blocked arteries between his heart and lungs.

Yolanda and Steve Turner are awaiting Thursday’s review

Filed under: Uncategorized, ,

Midwife sacked over new Morecambe Bay death

A midwife who is being probed over the death of a baby eight years ago has been sacked following an investigation into a new fatality.

Lindsey Biggs is one of a band of midwives accused of colluding to cover up blunders which contributed to the deaths of 12 mothers and babies in the Morecambe Bay scandal. The group – who dubbed themselves “the musketeers” – have continued working at the NHS trust despite public outrage over the deaths, which occurred between 2004 and 2013.

Ms Biggs is currently under investigation by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) for alleged failings linked to the case of baby Joshua Titcombe, who died in 2008. She is due to appear in front of regulators this week over the case. But it has now emerged that she has been dismissed by University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay trust over the death of another baby, just four months ago.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/06/26/midwife-sacked-over-new-morecambe-bay-death/

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Lindsey Biggs is accused of failings over the deaths of two babies

Filed under: Named & Shamed, NHS Blunders, , ,

NHS to withhold report on primary care support problems until 2017

NHS England will wait more than a year before it publishes its report of serious and significant events recorded for primary care support services since Capita took over.

Pulse has learned that NHS England intends to publish an annual round-up of the problems raised by practices, but the first publication – due July 2016 – will only cover issues reported by 31 March this year.

This will not include the details around the piles of uncollected patient notes and dwindling stocks of essential clinical supplies, which have happened since the new national system went live at the start of April. LMC leaders are also reporting that GPs have ‘given up’ on flagging concerns because they are fatigued with the number of problems they have to document.

GP leaders have labelled NHS England’s decision a ‘bloody disgrace’, adding that Capita is operating under different standards to practices that are required to regularly audit and learn from significant events.

Click on the link to read the full article

http://goo.gl/w2inl4

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Filed under: GP's, , ,

Coroner puts hospital’s weekend staffing in spotlight after death of woman

A coroner will raise his concerns about weekend staffing levels at a hospital following the death of a grandmother-of-nine after a routine hernia operation.

Margaret Gleeson, 70, died on a Sunday just two days after being admitted to Wigan’s Royal Albert Edward Infirmary. An inquest into her death was told that weekend staffing was a concern with a consultant surgeon admitting he could not give the same attention to patients.

One on-call medical team was being asked to do the job of four teams with emergency admissions taking priority and leading to delayed and shorter medical reviews of elective cases, Bolton Coroner’s Court was told. Widow Mrs Gleeson, a stewardess at her local bridge club, was described by her family as “a fit and active woman” before she went into hospital on October 2 last year.

The surgery was initially thought to have been a success but Mrs Gleeson’s condition began to deteriorate the day following the operation and doctors found that tissue in the bowel had been torn – described as “a rare complication”. The court heard an ‘early warning score’ used by medics to establish the risk to a patient’s health had earlier been incorrectly recorded.

Coroner Simon Jones concluded that Mrs Gleeson, of Swinley, Wigan, died of cardiac arrest suffered when she was anaesthetised for surgery to repair damage from the initial operation.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.herefordtimes.com/news/national/14573793.Coroner_puts_hospital_s_weekend_staffing_in_spotlight_after_death_of_woman/

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Margaret Gleeson died on a Sunday, two days after being admitted to the Royal Albert Edward Infirmary

Filed under: NHS Blunders, ,

The NHS needs a strong dose of tech investment

This is why MyNotes Medical will be such an asset for patients and the health professionals by documenting everything and having all your notes in one place ‘ Your phone and tablet’ Joanna

The health service could do with an IT injection to help bring its 1950’s style processes into the 21st century.

The announcement of £4.2bn in funding to move the NHS towards a digital, “paper-free” future raises challenges and rekindles memories of past attempts. In fairness, the NHS gets less credit than it should for its progress with technology. GP surgeries are computerised, the health service has excellent technology for transferring data around the country, digital imaging and online referrals, and the largest secure email service in the world.

But, with the National Programme for IT still casting a long shadow, many processes are stuck in the 1950s. Letters are still sent between hospitals, GPs and social services. Many doctors still hand-write test requests; people move paper records from ward to clinic to operating theatre. Patients wait for doctors in beds and in clinics. Different organisations work in silos and, while some have improved their processes and IT, they don’t communicate electronically with each other. Imagining the future when you are stuck in the past is difficult and the NHS will need support.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/healthcare-network/2016/jun/20/nhs-strong-dose-tech-investment?

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Filed under: NHS, ,

£177k forked out by NHS on New Cross whistleblower bill

An independent report on New Cross Hospital’s botched investigation into a whistleblower’s claims cost the NHS nearly £180,000, it can be revealed.

Investigative consultants Verita were called in to look at New Cross bosses’ handling of Sandra Haynes-Kirkbright’s allegations relating to an alleged cover up over mortality rates. A Freedom of Information request by the Express & Star reveals the firm was paid £134,879 for producing the report, with a further £42,688 spent on legal fees.

The total figure of £177,567 has been branded a ‘scandalous waste of taxpayers’ money’ by a prominent city councillor, while Walsall Manor Hospital whistleblower Dr David Drew said he was appalled that such vast sums had been ‘squandered’ rather than being spent on patient care.

Verita’s inquiry led to calls for the trust’s chief executive David Loughton to stand down over his treatment of Mrs Haynes-Kirkbright. It found that the Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust’s investigation into claims of malpractice was ‘significantly flawed’ and criticised Mr Loughton for being ‘dismissive’ of the allegations.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.expressandstar.com/news/health/2016/06/19/177k-forked-out-by-nhs-on-new-cross-whistleblower-bill/

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Sandra Haynes-Kirkbright

Filed under: NHS Blunders, Whistleblowing, ,

Hospital apologises to parents after damning report on handling of baby’s death

Bristol Children’s Hospital has issued an ‘unreserved’ apology to the parents of a baby who died in its care, after a report found staff had been ‘insensitive’ and had ‘failed to get a grip of the real issues’ following the death of Benjamin Condon.

In one incident, senior staff held a recorded meeting with Benjamin’s parents, and when Allyn and Jenny Condon left the room, the doctors admitted mistakes had been made in Benjamin’s care, and then tried to delete that part of the recording:  Eight week-old Benjamin Condon died of a lung infection while in Bristol Children’s Hospital. Doctors there had originally diagnosed him with a virus – thought to be part of a common cold. But he continued to deteriorate.

On 17 April 2015, nurses told Benjamin’s parents that they would start him on a course of antibiotics, but they were not administered. By the afternoon, he was diagnosed with sepsis and organ failure, and suffered a cardiac arrest. Antibiotics were finally given around 8pm, but he died slightly more than an hour later. His parents were not told about the secondary infection until seven weeks after his death.

A two-day inquest into his death begins tomorrow morning (Tuesday 21 June) at Avon Coroner’s Court, to determine exactly how he died.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.itv.com/news/west/2016-06-20/hospital-apologises-to-parents-after-damning-report-on-babys-death/

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Benjamin Condon shortly before he died. Credit: Condon family

Filed under: NHS Blunders,

North Middlesex hospital A&E faces closure on safety grounds

Exclusive: Move would be first in NHS history, as internal documents seen by the Guardian show junior staff often left in charge of casualty unit.

An A&E unit has been threatened with closure on safety grounds for the first time in the NHS’s history, amid fears that its 500 patients a day are at what the medical regulator calls “serious risk” of suffering harm. The General Medical Council, which regulates doctors, and Health Education England, the NHS’s staffing agency, have both issued the unprecedented warnings to North Middlesex hospital over what one local MP described as “a catalogue of failings” in its emergency department.

Unpublished internal confidential NHS documents seen by the Guardian reveal widespread alarm in the NHS locally and nationally that some of the hospital’s A&E doctors lack the basic skills to do their jobs, and that young, inexperienced doctors have been asked to perform tasks they were not qualified to undertake.

There are also occasions on which, despite their lack of experience, “junior staff [are] being left in charge of the [emergency] department, highlighting a probable risk to patients”, a private meeting of NHS chiefs was told last month. There is also serious concern that just two of the 26 junior doctors in training in the A&E have ever worked in an emergency department before and that care in the unit overnight is described as “an area of significant risk” to patient safety.

Click on the link to read more

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/jun/14/north-middlesex-hospital-ae-faces-closure-on-safety-grounds

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Ambulances outside A&E at North Middlesex hospital.

Filed under: Hospital, , ,

‘I survived sepsis – only for it to kill my son’: Mother whose baby boy died after medics missed killer illness discovers she had battled blood poisoning first

  • William Mead, one, died in 2014 after medics failed to spot signs of sepsis 
  • Inquiry after his death revealed a staggering 15 failures in his care
  • Melissa Mead has met with Jeremy Hunt to discuss a sepsis campaign
  • Was shocked to learn only months ago she too battled sepsis in 2011 

Melissa Mead finds it hard to recall the time when she knew nothing about sepsis or the devastating swiftness with which it can kill.

Since her baby son, William, died from it, aged one, in December 2014, following a catalogue of errors, misdiagnoses and missed opportunities by doctors and the NHS helpline, she’s become an expert on the subject, campaigning to raise awareness and ensure others don’t die needlessly. So consider her shock when she learned, only months ago, that she herself had almost died from the condition. Following surgery in 2011, she became critically ill with an infection.

The revelation that the infection was sepsis came during a session with the psychiatrist who has treated her for depression and post-traumatic shock since William died.

There are no words to explain how profoundly the trauma of losing William affected my mental health,’ she recalls. ‘I am still having intensive therapy, and during one session my psychiatrist asked me: “How does it make you feel to know you survived sepsis and William didn’t?” I was confused. I said: “What do you mean?”

‘He has access to my medical notes and he said: “When you were very ill in hospital five years ago, you had sepsis.” ‘I can’t really remember the rest of the conversation because I was so shocked. I asked him to explain and he told me the infection after my operation was sepsis. ‘I wonder now if I’d been aware of what it was and what to look out for, whether we’d have been more alert to the symptoms when William developed it. ‘We should have been told. If we had been, things could have been so different.’

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/Uyt35I

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Filed under: NHS Blunders,

Patients ‘will be put at risk and operations delayed’ as shortage of anaesthetists in the NHS is set to grow

  • In 2033 there may only be 8,000 anaesthetists instead of promised 11, 800
  • A shortage of anaesthetists could jeopardise the safety of patients
  • 74% of hospitals are forced to bring in locum anaesthetists from outside 

New research has shown that by 2033 we will not have enough anaesthetists in hospital to cater for rising patient demand. The Royal College of Anaesthetists (RCoA) has warned that while the NHS has promised there will be 11,800 anaesthetists by 2033, in reality there may only be 8,000  – 33 per cent less than anticipated.

Anaesthesia is just one area of medical care which suffers a shortfall in staff despite their work being vital to the smooth running of hospitals. Their roles include the preoperative preparation of surgical patients, pain relief in labour and obstetric anaesthesia and transport of acutely ill and injured patients. A shortage of anaesthetists could jeopardise the safety of patients.

According to the college’s latest census of the UK’s anaesthesia workforce, 74% of hospitals are forced to bring in locum anaesthetists from medical employment agencies – all of which adds to the NHS’s £3.7billion annual bill for temporary staff. Moreover more often than not staff anaesthetists are called on to perform other duties around hospitals in extra shifts to fill up the rota.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/SL45Lk

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Filed under: Hospital, ,

The dawn of a new era for cancer survival: Tailored treatment made ‘inoperable’ liver cancer vanish – giving new hope to patients

The dawn of a new era for cancer survival: Tailored treatment made ‘inoperable’ liver cancer vanish – giving new hope to patients

  • Molecular profiling helps doctors identify drugs to beat individual tumours
  • One patient was given new hope after inoperable liver cancer diagnosis
  • The approach has been hailed as the dawn of a new era for cancer survival

It was hailed as the dawn of a new era for cancer survival – ‘personalised medicine’ that helps doctors identify the drugs most likely to beat individual tumours. Now one of the first patients to benefit from such an approach, known as molecular profiling, has revealed how the breakthrough has given him new hope after he was diagnosed with inoperable liver cancer.

The procedure, details of which were announced last week, allows doctors to analyse tumour samples to determine a unique set of biomarkers – a chemical ‘fingerprint’ of that cancer. Profiling of the tumour sample, taken during a standard biopsy, can provide information about the cancer after just one or two weeks of analysis.

This can then be used to precisely match the patient’s treatment to their particular cancer, allowing scientists to offer a bespoke treatment and reducing the use of drugs that often have brutal side effects and could be of little benefit.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/YzYEo5

Molecular profiling gave new hope to retired company director Spartaco Dusi, 76, (pictured with his wife Giulana), after he was diagnosed with liver cancer in February at a hospital near his home in Sweden

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Filed under: Cancer, , ,

Southern Health Trust made a statement to Sara Ryan and her family saying they were very sorry for Connor’s death.

They said it was their fault because they neglected him. We were relieved to read this but wonder why they took so long to say sorry properly. Connor’s family have had to wait 3 years for this and have had to go through hell.

We wonder why they did not talk about how badly the family have been treated by the Chief Executive, Katrina Percy, some of their staff and some of their board. We wonder how so many people who do their jobs badly still have them and get paid so much money.

Click on the link from People First England to read more

People First England

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Connor Sparrowhawk

Filed under: Mental Health,

‘This isn’t acceptable’: outcry at state of NHS mental health care funding

Ministers given wake-up call after YouGov poll shows huge support for greater spending on mental health care

A cross-party inquiry by MPs into the funding of mental health services has received more than 95,000 personal submissions in an unprecedented display of anger over the state of the NHS.  One woman who submitted testimony linking the lack of support to suicide rates said the failure of the system to respond to people in trouble was often “what pushes you over the edge”. She wrote: “I’m scared my husband could become one of these statistics.”

A separate YouGov poll commissioned and crowdfunded by the campaigning organisation38 Degrees found that 74% of voters believe that funding for mental health should be greater or equal to funding for physical health. The amount actually spent on mental health by the NHS last year, despite government pledges to establish parity, was just 11.9% of overall NHS spending.

Meg Hillier, chairwoman of the public accounts committee holding the inquiry, said the scale of the response underlined the strength of feeling that mental health was being underfunded. “We shall question NHS England and the Department of Health on how they can meet the government’s pledges,” she said.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/jun/11/public-anger-soaring-mental-health-care-nhs?CMP=twt_gu

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Filed under: Mental Health, , ,

North Middlesex issued with warning over emergency department

A warning notice has been issued to North Middlesex University NHS Trust after an unannounced CQC inspection found ineffective treatment of patients in the emergency room.

The inspection, in April, found the department was lacking middle grade doctors and consultants and suffered delays in assessing patients and moving them to specialist wards. The trust has now been given until 26 August to make improvements.

Professor Edward Baker, the CQC’s deputy chief inspector of hospitals, said: “People going to the emergency department at the North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust are entitled to an service that is safe, effective and responsive.

“When we inspected we found that patients were not receiving the quality of care that they should have been. We have strongly encouraged the trust to engage with other organisations across the local health and social care system to resolve this challenging issue.”

Julie Lowe, the trust’s chief executive, said that there were currently only seven out of 15 emergency department consultants and seven out of 13 middle grade emergency doctors in place, leading to “unacceptably long” waiting times.

“We have undertaken extensive recruitment exercises and despite our best efforts have, so far, been unable to fill all the posts, although we have made good progress in recent weeks with the support of partners,” she said. “We are working hard with our health partners to resolve the issues and bring the service back to the standard both we and our patients expect us to achieve.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.nationalhealthexecutive.com/Health-Care-News/north-middlesex-issued-with-warning-over-emergency-department

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Filed under: A&E, , ,

Bowel cancer: Stents ‘may prevent need for colostomy bags’

Bowel cancer patients may avoid the need for colostomy bags if they are first treated by having an expandable tube inserted at the site of their blockage, cancer doctors have said.

The new approach, presented at the world’s biggest cancer conference, showed that the tube, or stent, cut the risk of complications from surgery.

Experts said colostomy bags, to collect faeces, often frightened patients. Globally, nearly 1.4 million cases of bowel cancer are diagnosed each year.

In the UK, more than a fifth of the cancers go undetected until the tumour blocks the intestines, leaving patients needing emergency surgery. This unplanned surgery has a much higher risk of complications compared with routine surgery. The patient is often in worse health, the swelling caused by the blockage can mean keyhole surgery is not possible so more invasive surgery is needed and there may not be a colorectal specialist surgeon on hand.

The death rate goes up from 2% for planned surgery to 12% in emergency bowel cancer surgery.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-36426598

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Filed under: Cancer, ,

Priory Hospital in Ticehurst ‘neglected’ girl, 14, found hanged

The death of a 14-year-old girl may have been prevented if she had received proper care at a Sussex mental health hospital, according to an inquest jury.

Amy El-Keria was found hanged in her room at the Priory Hospital, Ticehurst, after tying a scarf around her neck. The inquest in Horsham heard staff were not trained in resuscitation and did not call 999 quickly enough.

The jury said Amy died of unintended consequences of a deliberate act, contributed to by neglect.  It said staffing levels were inadequate, and a lack of one-to-one time caused or contributed to the teenager’s death in November 2012 in a “significant” way.

Amy had a complex range of problems and mental health diagnoses, and died within three months of being moved to the Priory after being asked to leave her specialist boarding school in Berkshire.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-surrey-36435330

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Amy El-Keria

Filed under: Mental Health,

Revealed: 30,000 patients left waiting in ambulances outside London A&Es last year

More than 30,000 patients suffered “appalling” delays stuck in ambulances outside London A&Es last year because of a lack of hospital beds, it can be revealed.

They were forced to wait at least 30 minutes — double the maximum time permitted under NHS rules — before crews were able to wheel them into the emergency department.

More than 3,000 were kept in ambulances for more than an hour. The total amount of time wasted during “delayed handovers” totalled 16,361 hours — the equivalent of almost two years. It is one of the reasons London Ambulance Service failed to hit the eight-minute response target for 999 calls every month last year, as crews and vehicles were unavailable for the next call.

Patient groups today warned that the total delay in patients receiving care was likely to have been far greater, as patients may have to wait an hour or more for an ambulance and then at least four hours in A&E.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/xRyRqp

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Filed under: A&E, , ,

Hospitals hit by a 36% rise in heart failure cases: Number up by a third in a decade… because more people are surviving heart attacks

  • Record numbers of people are reporting to hospital with heart failure
  • Number of people diagnosed in England have increased by 9,000
  • Heart failure is where the heart struggles to pump blood around the body
  • It is often caused by a heart attack, when the heart muscles are damaged

Record numbers of people are reporting to hospital with heart failure, according to alarming NHS statistics. Hospitals have seen visits by patients with heart failure increase by more than a third in the last decade, the figures reveal. And the number of people diagnosed with the condition in England have increased by 9,000 in the last 12 months alone, according to GP lists.

Experts today warn that the unexpected growth in the problem demands radical new treatments. Heart failure is a debilitating and incurable condition, in which the heart struggles to pump blood properly around the body.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/q0tlhM

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Filed under: Hospital,

Winterbourne View scandal families urge PM to shut ‘outdated care units’

Families of victims of the Winterbourne View scandal have written to the Prime Minister demanding he shuts outdated care home institutions.

In an open letter they express “anger” at the “painfully slow lack of change” five years after abuse at the former private hospital near Bristol was exposed in an undercover BBC Panorama documentary.

A recent report revealed that some 3,500 vulnerable people with learning disabilities are still languishing at inpatient units despite a Government pledge to close them in the wake of the Winterbourne View scandal.

Now five years after the documentary was broadcast, families of some of the victims are demanding action.

Click on the link to read the open letter

http://www.herefordtimes.com/news/national/14525100.Winterbourne_View_scandal_families_urge_PM_to_shut__outdated_care_units_/

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Filed under: Disabilities, , ,

Horrifying Photos Show What Nursing Staff’s Alleged Neglect Did To Elderly Woman’s Body

Warning: Some of the following photos are disturbing

What this woman found out about the care her mom was receiving at a nursing home prompted her to take unusual action and may serve as a cautionary tale for anyone considering putting their parents or grandparents in such a facility.

Anahita Behrooz says she was with her mother nearly every day. She and her kids would take turns loving on her “mum” who “bed bound”. When her mother developed a uterine tract infection, she was sent to the hospital. But then national health doctors sent her to a nursing home. It proved to be a huge mistake.

Click on the link to read more

Horrifying Photos Show What Nursing Staff’s Alleged Neglect Did To Elderly Woman’s Body

Filed under: Care Homes, Elderly, , ,

Communication and the 6Cs: the patient experience … Author Christopher Barber for Nursing Times

One patient’s story highlights the importance of nurses and staff communicating effectively, and how poor communication can have a negative impact on patients.

In this article…

  • One patient’s experience of nursing care in a hospital setting
  • Examples of poor communication skills
  • What to be aware of when communicating with patients

5 talking points

1. How can communication affect the patient experience? 2. Can you think of a situation when better communication could have prevented a patient becoming frustrated, upset or receiving inappropriate care? 3. What should health professionals bear in mind when giving patients information about their condition or treatment? 4. How can you check whether patients have understood everything they have been told? 5. How can health professionals improve their communication skills?

Click on the link to read the article

Communication and the 6Cs The patient experience

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Filed under: Hospital, ,

Decline in NHS quality’ reported – International Medical Press – 25 May 2016

Over the past year the quality of patient care has deteriorated in a number of areas, according to  a  report from The King’s Fund.

A new report from The King’s Fund has revealed that 65% of trust finance directors and 54% of Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) leads feel that patient care has declined in the past year.

Only 2% of trust finance directors and 12% of CCG finance leads said that patient care had improved in the past 12 months. Findings are based on a survey of 241 trust finance directors and 149 CCG finance leads. The think-tank says the latest findings are the ‘most worrying’ since it began monitoring this in 2012.

Click on the link to read more

Decline in NHS quality

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Filed under: NHS, ,

NHS failing to learn lessons from complaints, says health ombudsman

A snapshot of complaints received by the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO) reveals a high number of complaints made to the NHS and consistent failure to learn from mistakes, the PHSO has said.

Of the 133 cases in the report, which were investigated between July and September last year, 93 were about the NHS. In another PHSO report last year, nearly 80% of complaints were about the NHS.

Julie Mellor, the PHSO, said: “The NHS provides excellent care for patients every day, which is why it is so important that when mistakes are made they are dealt with well.

“These cases bring home all the suffering patients and their families experience when things go wrong, particularly when complaints are not handled effectively at a local level. Families have been left without an explanation as to why their loved ones died, mistakes have not been admitted, which means that much needed service improvements are being delayed.”

In one incident in the report, Alder Hey Children’s FT was required to pay £1,000 compensation to the complainant after it took 29 months to diagnose her son with autism and dyslexia, meaning he missed out on early intervention and support.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.nationalhealthexecutive.com/Health-Care-News/nhs-failing-to-learn-lessons-from-complaints-says-health-ombudsman

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Filed under: NHS Blunders, , ,

Living with Dementia: Chris’s Story – To be aired on BBC 1 Thurs 2 Jun 2016

In a powerful, multi-textured documentary filmed over almost two years, one family living with dementia reveals what life is really like behind closed doors.

Using CCTV cameras, video diaries and a small,immersive film crew, the programme follows 55-year-old Chris Roberts from north Wales as he, his wife Jayne and his youngest daughter Kate come to terms with his Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

From making the decision to choose his own care home to writing a living will, getting lost in his own house and not recognising his family, Chris chronicles his changing life as his independence slips away. Once a businessman and a keen biker, he now struggles to walk and talk – his life is beset by frustration, yet his remarkable insight allows us into his world.

 

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07dxmyh

Filed under: Dementia, ,

Exclusive: Charity nurses warn of ‘postcode lottery’ in specialist children’s care by Jo Stephenson for Nursing Times

Expert children’s nurses have highlighted wide variations in services and standards for children with complex health needs as the ground-breaking charity nursing scheme celebrates its 10th anniversary.

The WellChild Children’s Nurse Programme, which has been in existence for a decade as of last month, was set up to address gaps in care for children with multiple health needs.

Services provided by its nurses have made a dramatic difference to families including reducing distressing emergency hospital admissions and cutting lengthy stays in hospital.

However, nurses and managers involved in the scheme warn that many children with complex health conditions still face a “postcode lottery” when it comes to getting all-round support. Problems include reductions in children’s community nursing teams, huge variation in the types of services available and a lack of emotional support and training for parents caring for seriously ill children.

Click on the link to read more

Exclusive Charity nurses warn of ‘postcode lottery in specialist children’s care

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Filed under: Hospital,

My Story With Addisons Disease – Justice for Robbie Powell! article by Malisha Fuller

Let’s see how many shares we can get for justice for this family and awareness.

Because of negligence by medical professionals, Robert Darren Powell [Robbie] died on April 17, 1990 at the young age of 10. Four months before his death, he suffered from all the classical symptoms of Addison’s disease or Adrenal Insufficiency. Robbie had suffered from an Addisonian crisis and almost died in December 1989 when he was admitted to hospital as a medical emergency.

The medical professionals suspected Addison’s disease and ordered the ACTH test but did not share this information with his parents who would have ensured the test was carried out. Instead, the physicians blamed Robbie’s symptoms on gastroenteritis, which was untenable in the absence of diarrhoea, the high potassium, low sodium and low blood sugar.

Robbie was seen by 5 different doctors, on 7 separate occasions, in the last 15 days of his life. He was seen by 3 doctors, 4 times, in his last 3 days. Although the young boy was obviously unwell not one physician performed blood tests or even checked his blood pressure during this period. The medical physicians failed Robbie by not referring the child to a specialist, as requested in the medical notes. They also failed to admit him to the hospital to evaluate his condition thoroughly until it was too late to save his life. An Addison’s patient does not produce sufficient amounts of the hormone cortisol so therefore needs daily steroids to maintain life. Infection, stress, injury and surgery for Addison’s sufferers require additional steroids.

Click on the link to read the whole story

My Story With Addisons Disease

Robbie Powell

 

Filed under: GP's, NHS Blunders, ,

Daughter launches app after seeing mother’s struggle – but now she needs your help

PATIENTS will be able to track their health and medical notes through an innovative program currently vying for start-up money.

The app, MyNotes Medical, has been designed to help patients keep track of meetings with their doctor, symptoms and other appointments.

Borehamwood resident Joanna Slater co-founded the app after seeing her mother struggle to keep up with the notes and day-to-day occurrences of her own treatment before her death in 2008. Ms Slater said: “My mother went into hospital in 2007 for a hip surgery and things were hard to keep track of so I started taking notes. She died in hospital six months later.”

“It’s hard to remember everything and it was then that I realised the importance of taking notes.” She said many patients struggled to keep track of their handwritten notes or could forget when a meeting occurred – something which she hoped MyNotes Medical would help to avoid.

Working with business partner Brad Meyer, Ms Slater said the team was almost finished with the first prototype of the app.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.borehamwoodtimes.co.uk/news/14498170.Daughter_launches_app_after_seeing_mother_s_struggle___but_now_she_needs_your_help/

Filed under: Uncategorized

Junior doctors dispute: BMA and government reach deal. 18 May 2016

Acas released a statement following ten days of ‘intensive talks’ to seek to resolve the long running junior doctors’ dispute Credit: Reuters

The government and the British Medical Association (BMA) have reached a deal in resolving the dispute over new junior doctors’ contracts, following 10 days of talks at the conciliation service Acas.

The deal is subject to BMA junior doctor members approving the new contract in a vote. Under the deal, doctors will be paid a normal rate for Saturdays and Sundays between the hours of 9am and 9pm.

It also includes:

  • A basic pay rise of between 10% and 11%
  • Any shifts which start at or after 8pm and lasts longer than eight hours, and which finishes at or by 10am the following day, will result in an enhanced 37% pay rate for all the hours worked.
  • Doctors will receive a percentage of their salary for working more than six weekends a year – this will range from 3% for working one weekend in 7, and up to 10% if working one weekend in two.

If approved, Acas expect the new deal to be finalised in the next two weeks, with elements of the new contract coming into force from August. All junior doctors will then move onto the new terms between October and August 2017.

No further industrial action will be called while the vote is underway. Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt and the BMA have both welcomed the deal.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-05-18/junior-doctors-dispute-bma-and-government-reach-deal/

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Filed under: Uncategorized, , ,

How it all started, my mothers story

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Joanna Slater chronicles her mother Kay’s agonising six-month decline after a routine hip op – at the hands of an NHS where  many have simply forgotten how to care… 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1394300/NHS-hip-operation-mother-died-Daughters-harrowing-account.html

 

Filed under: Uncategorized, , ,

A good death should be doctors and patients’ last life goal

My aim as a doctor is to heal the sick but when I am unable, to prevent suffering by Rohin Francis Junior doctor

I treat some of the sickest patients admitted to hospital and making decisions about resuscitation is a routine part of my job. In addition to being a doctor, I am also younger brother to Neil, who has severe learning disabilities.

Communication is key in all aspects of healthcare, but particularly in end-of-life decisions. As doctors we are encouraged and obliged to discuss resuscitation with patients and, if appropriate, their families. In the vast majority of cases, a simple, honest conversation ensures that all parties are in agreement. As a more junior doctor, I shied away from bringing up what I considered a morbid subject. Why upset the jovial 85 year-old I’ve just admitted with talk of death? But now I realise that explaining the best and worse case scenarios is the right approach.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/healthcare-network/views-from-the-nhs-frontline/2016/may/09/good-death-should-doctors-patients-last-life-goal

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Filed under: Uncategorized

This is what the health professionals are saying about MyNotes Medical from Elissa Bradshaw – Clinical Nurse Specialist St Marks Hospital

“In the context of the current healthcare setting we are all required to be partners in patient care. Mynotes medical offers the opportunity for a streamlined cohesive approach to patient centred, and personalised care. As healthcare professionals we have a responsibility to support and advocate patient choice. This unique tool will enhance the patient experience and facilitate us in offering the best care that we can” Elissa Bradshaw, Clinical Nurse Specialist St Marks Hospital

Filed under: Uncategorized

Jeremy Hunt ‘not fit to wear’ an NHS badge, says consultant

Jeremy Hunt is “not fit to wear” an NHS badge because his “militant” politics are destroying the health service, an A&E consultant has claimed.

Dr Rob Galloway, who works at Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, said he was “blood boiling angry” after reading a letter sent by the Health Secretary thanking health workers for keeping patients safe during the junior doctors’ strike last week.

In the letter, Mr Hunt said: “I would like to pay tribute to the NHS staff that have once again pulled out all the stops to keep services running effectively during industrial action.” He thanked the “dedicated” healthcare professionals who have “planned for weeks, worked long hours and pulled together to ensure services remained safe this week” and said they were a “credit to our world-class NHS”.

But the letter published by the Department of Health angered Dr Galloway who questioned how the Secretary of State could write such a “nauseating” note. “It’s an embarrassing and pathetic letter made worse by the fact there is a picture of you on it wearing an NHS badge,” Dr Galloway wrote in a Facebook post with a photograph of the letter.

“Any picture of you creates in me a Pavlovian response of upset. But this picture with an NHS badge on, has made my blood boil.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.expressandstar.com/news/uk-news/2016/04/30/jeremy-hunt-not-fit-to-wear-an-nhs-badge-says-consultant/

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Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has been heavily criticised

Filed under: NHS,

Mother gave birth in her bedroom after being ‘turned away’ from hospital

A FURIOUS mum is suing health chiefs over claims they turned her away from a maternity unit because “they needed the beds”

Kerry Symington was in labour and her waters had broken when midwives at Kirkcaldy’s Victoria Hospital rejected her pleas to be allowed into the hospital’s labour suite. She went home in tears and immediately had her fourth child in her bedroom.

It was delivered by partner Andrew Cairns and paramedics, but she suffered massive complications. She haemorrhaged and lost so much blood she had to be placed on a long-term course of iron tablets afterwards.

The “traumatic” episode has now prompted Kerry to sue for damages. “I want to prevent this happening to other mums,” the 30-year-old said. “It is only a matter of time before someone dies.”

Click on the link to read more

https://www.sundaypost.com/news/scottish-news/mother-gave-birth-bedroom-turned-away-hospital/

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Kerry Symington and daughter, Lacey

Filed under: Hospital, ,

My Child did exist

Shared via Will Powell… No bereaved parent should be made to feel this way but sadly there are some people who just don’t understand.

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Filed under: Uncategorized

Girl, 14, died at Bristol Children’s Hospital after overstretched staff operated on her by torchlight

The family of 14-year-old girl who died during an over-stretched hospital night shift have called for more NHS staff to be on duty around-the-clock.

Emma Welch underwent an apparently successful operation to correct a curvature of her spine just days after undertaking a charity walk up Mount Snowdon. But the following night she suffered an internal bleed which triggered a fatal heart attack and she required emergency surgery.

However, just two of nine operating theatres at Bristol Children’s Hospital were open at the time because it was late at night – and they were both in use. There were not enough anaesthetists or emergency staff to open another theatre so medics had to operate on her by torchlight on a ward.

Doctors battled through the night to try and replace the blood she was rapidly losing but she tragically died at 3.42am on June 4.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/04/27/girl-14-died-at-bristol-childrens-hospital-after-overstretched-s/

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Emma on her ascent of Mount Snowdon

Filed under: NHS Blunders,

Medical students set to ‘abandon’ the NHS

The junior doctors’ dispute may lead to the ‘loss of a generation of doctors’ in England as medical students consider alternative options, a survey suggests.

The survey, conducted by the British Medical Association (BMA), reports that as many as 82% of students said they would be ‘less likely’ than before to make their medical career in England.

A total of 1,197 students participated in the survey. Overall, 94% stated that their enthusiasm for working in the NHS waned due to the dispute and some 34.3% stated they would now be ‘less likely’ to continue their career in medicine.

Click on the link to read more

Medical students set to abandon the NHS

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Filed under: NHS, Uncategorized, ,

‘This shade is Complete Mental Breakdown’: YouTuber creates satirical make-up tutorial to candidly detail her struggle with the many symptoms of her depression

  • Amy Gelibter, 21, runs a funny, honest YouTube channel
  • In her latest make-up tutorial, she applies cosmetics while describing what depression feels like
  • She uses shades of foundation and lipstick she jokingly calls ‘You Don’t Need Medication’, ‘I’m Trapped Inside My Own Mind’ and ‘Just Smile More’
  • The Pennsylvania resident says she wants to tackle the stigmas surrounding mental illness to help depressed people feel less alone

A popular YouTuber’s latest beauty tutorial sees her applying foundation with a beauty blender, brushing on mascara, painting on liquid lipstick — and opening up about what depression feels like.

Amy Geliebter 21, is incredibly honest in the witty new video, which takes the form of a standard make-up tutorial but actually gets real about the causes and symptoms of depression while addressing the stigmas surrounding mental illness.

The Pennsylvania resident jokes about her struggle with depressive feelings, applying cosmetics in made-up shades that describe how she feels inside as well as how others expect her to behave.

Click on the link to read and watch the video

http://goo.gl/0q5T1z

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Opening up: The video aims to help remove the stigmas around mental illness

Filed under: Disabilities,

Southern Health chief executive to face MPs

The leader of an under-fire health trust criticised for the “preventable” death of an 18-year-old will be scrutinised by MPs.

Chief executive of the Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust, Katrina Percy, will address MPs in a special meeting at Westminster on Tuesday. The trust was criticised for “longstanding risks to patients”.

In 2013 Connor Sparrowhawk drowned in a bath after suffering an epileptic fit in Oxford.  The chief executive will address MPs at a meeting of the Hampshire All-Party Parliamentary Group. Ms Percy has previously apologised for the issues that came to light following several inspections by government watchdogs.

After an inspection in January, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) found there were “longstanding risks to patients” and investigations into deaths “were not good enough.” Scrutiny of the trust was sparked by the death of Connor Sparrowhawk at Slade House in Oxford in 2013.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-36073266

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Connor Sparrowhawk, who died at Slade House, had epilepsy and experienced seizures

Filed under: NHS Blunders,

Senior nurses emphasise need to target ‘shocking’ staff retention rates – By Nicola Merrifield for Nursing Times

Successful strategies by employers to retain nurses are only found in “pockets” across the country and more work must be done to tackle sometimes “shocking” turnover rates, senior nurses have warned.
Redeploying staff between wards, unfixed rotas that are published last-minute and a perception of an increasing focus on targets over quality of care are among the problems of greatest concern.

Senior nurses and advisors pointed to poor roster management as one of the main issues when they spoke at Nursing Times’ Deputies Congress event last week.
Nicola Ranger, director of nursing at Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust, said it was often the newly qualified nurses who suffered the most from highly variable rotas and being moved between wards. At her own trust, she said around 400 nurses were lost each year, which she described as “shocking”.

Click on the link to read more

Senior nurses emphasise need to target

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Filed under: Hospital,

9000 Gloucestershire patients caught in NHS no man’s land

Around 9000 people in Gloucestershire who are registered with Welsh GPs are still are still being treated unlawfully – according to a campaign group. It’s a claim disputed by NHS Wales.

Action4OurCare has been fighting for the rights of residents for three years, so they can gain access to treatment they are entitled to at English hospitals. One of the people caught up in this NHS no-mans land in Guy Rastell – like thousands of others he lives in England, but has no choice but to register with a Welsh GP: Now he’s received a letter from his consultant at Southmead Hospital saying that despite wanting to treat still him she could no longer do so, because “the Welsh NHS are not (and have not previously) funded any of his clinical visits”.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.itv.com/news/west/2016-04-13/gloucester-patients-caught-in-nhs-no-mans-land/

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I find that astonishing. I’ve always lived in England since 1947. I find it very strange that after 33 years of continuous attendance, somehow funding comes into it to stop my continuing care.  GUY RASTELL

 

Filed under: GP's,

Coroner gives cops deadline to finally interview staff at hospital over Seanpaul Carnahan death

Police have been given four weeks to interview witnesses over the death of a man in Belfast City Hospital three years ago.

Coroner Joe McCrisken told PSNI officers at a preliminary hearing into the death of Seanpaul Carnahan that he expected to see witness statements by May 13. Mr McCrisken, speaking at Laganside courts, said the situation had “gone on too long” and indicated a number of medical staff could be called to attend the inquest on September 26.

Mr Carnahan died aged 22 after being admitted to the hospital with a brain injury sustained during a suicide attempt. When admitted, the chef from the Beechmount area of west Belfast weighed 12 stone. When he died five months later in July 2013 he weighed five stone.

Official medical notes obtained by the family from the Belfast Trust – and seen by the Belfast Telegraph – show that during Seanpaul’s five months in hospital he was given a day’s worth of food in the space of two weeks. The lack of nutrition caused a serious condition known as refeeding syndrome, and in the last nine weeks of Seanpaul’s life he became more and more ill as his body attacked itself for food, before he eventually died. Last month this newspaper reported claims from his mother Tracy that police dragged their heels after her solicitor found the force had not formally interviewed any medical staff involved in Seanpaul’s care.

The solicitor and the family had been pushing for a corporate manslaughter or gross negligence charge to be brought against the Belfast Trust.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/erCHBc

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Seanpaul Carnahan

Filed under: NHS Blunders,

Pre People’s Assembly Protest in London LIVE on 16.04.16

The Government and British Medical Association aren’t talking and the mainstream media isn’t reporting, but WatMed Media will be LIVE at the London People’s Assembly Protest on 16th April 2016.

Share now! & get your questions in for Peter Stefanovic & Dr Bob Gill!

Click on the link to watch

Filed under: NHS,

Millions Will Discover the TRUTH About Cancer — The Little-Known Best Ways to Prevent and Beat It You Aren’t Being Told About — Starting April 12. Don’t Be Left Out of This Life-Saving Event…

This looks interesting and starts 12th April 2016. Sign up now if this affects you or your loved ones

The powerful cancer documentary seen and shared by millions when it first aired (to limited release) in 2015 is about to be unveiled to the world on April 12. For FREE, in its entirety, to those who sign up below today. You’ll discover the most effective ways to prevent and beat cancer — from 131 of the world’s top experts — that you won’t hear about elsewhere. Enter your first name and best email address below right now, and you’ll be first in line to see the entire 9-part series — for free — beginning with Episode 1 on April 12th…

Click on the link to sign up

A Global Quest

Filed under: Cancer,

87 years old and unwashed for days, left alone and in the dark – this is Britain’s care crisis.

Edith James’ son was worried about the treatment she was receiving from her carers – so he let Dispatches secretly film for three days.

Filed under: Elderly,

NHS complaints watchdog deputy quits over sexual harassment cover-up

Mick Martin assisted the chair of a Derbyshire NHS trust in covering up his conduct towards an HR director

The deputy chief of the NHS complaints watchdog has resigned over his involvement in covering up the sexual harassment of a director at an NHS trust.  Mick Martin, the deputy Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO), had already taken a leave of absence after being criticised by an employment tribunal, which led to an £832,711 compensation payment earlier this year.

The board of the PHSO has also launched an investigation into the organisation’s decision to appoint Mr Martin, and the actions taken by the ombudsman herself, Dame Julie Mellor, in relation to him.  It is the latest blow for the troubled complaints watchdog, which in the past two years has been criticised by Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt over its handling of the case of a three-year-old who died in NHS care, by the National Audit Office over its governance, and by the Health Select Committee over its performance in assisting patients with their complaints.

In a recent survey only 11 per cent of staff at the PHSO said they had confidence in the leadership, and Dame Julie has faced a call to resign from the editor of the respected Health Service Journal.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/fcR52G

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Mick Martin

Filed under: Named & Shamed,

Government urged to close junior doctors whistleblowing loophole 5 APRIL, 2016 BY SHAUN LINTERN – FOR HSA

The government should act to close a loophole in whistleblowing protection after a court ruled Health Education England’s relationship with junior doctors was outside the scope of employment law, HSJ has been told.

Legal experts said junior doctors continue to have whistleblowing protection from the actions of their employing trusts and this could include any subsequent action taken by HEE if it was based on information supplied by trust employees such as clinical supervisors.

The case of junior doctor Chris Day, who claims he was unfairly dismissed by Lewisham and Greenwich Trust for alleged whistleblowing in 2014, has caused widespread concern among trainees after an employment tribunal barred him from including HEE in his claim. An appeal ruling last month said Parliament had deliberately excluded junior doctors’ relationship with HEE from protection under employment law, adding that Dr Day was not an employee or worker of HEE.

Employment lawyers have told HSJ this does leave junior doctors at risk from detrimental treatment by HEE. Peter Daly, a solicitor at Bindmans law firm, said: “An employer is restricted from imposing a detriment on a whistleblower, but as HEE is not an employer there is no such restriction on HEE.

“This is a substantial gap in the protection for junior doctor whistleblowers. It is at odds with the government’s stated aim of protecting NHS whistleblowers, for example in the review by Sir Robert Francis QC. An amendment to the current legislation to address this situation would not be complex and might be achieved relatively quickly.”

He added that junior doctors could in theory judicially review a decision by HEE but this was likely to be “extremely expensive and realistically out of the financial reach of an individual doctor”.

Click on the link to read more

Government urged to close junior doctors whistleblowing loophole

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Filed under: Whistleblowing, ,

Datix appoints James Titcombe OBE as Patient Safety Specialist

Datix has appointed James Titcombe OBE in an advisory capacity as Patient Safety Specialist. James will work alongside the Datix senior management team on the development of the company’s pioneering software platform to help protect patients from harm in the UK and around the world. Formerly a project manager in the nuclear industry, James underwent a career change to become actively involved in patient safety following the tragic loss of his baby son Joshua, in 2008. Most recently, he has been working for the industry regulator the Care Quality Commission (CQC) as National Advisor on Patient Safety, Culture & Quality.

Delighted to welcome James to the team, Jonathan Hazan, Director of Datix said, “James is widely respected in the patient safety community in the UK and I am delighted to have him join our team. His enthusiasm is contagious and his commitment to improving patient safety is inspirational. James will be a real asset to Datix as we work on introducing new products to improve the quality of health and social care, improve patient outcomes and protect patients from harm.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.datix.co.uk/news-and-events/news/datix-appoints-james-titcombe-obe-as-patient-safety-specialist/

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James Titcombe OBE

Filed under: NHS Blunders, ,

Press release – NHS Improvement intends to take further action at Southern Health

NHS Improvement announces its intention to take further regulatory action at Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust

NHS Improvement has informed Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust that it intends to take further regulatory action at the trust to ensure urgent patient safety improvements are made, following a warning notice being issued by Care Quality Commission (CQC).

The trust was issued with a warning notice by the CQC which highlighted a number of improvements that needed to be made following an inspection. The CQC’s announcement is available here.

NHS Improvement intends to put an additional condition in the trust’s licence to provide NHS services, which would allow it to make management changes at the trust if progress isn’t made on fixing the concerns raised. The warning notice issued by the CQC identifies issues with how the trust monitors and improves the safety of its services, and how it assesses and manages any risks to its patients.

Click on the link to read more

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/nhs-improvement-intends-to-take-further-action-at-southern-health

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Filed under: Uncategorized, ,

Junior doctors’ row: The dispute explained

Ministers and junior doctors are locked in an increasingly fraught dispute in England. But what exactly is this row about?

What has caused the dispute?

Junior doctors’ leaders are objecting to the prospect of a new contract in England. The government has described the current arrangements as “outdated” and “unfair”, pointing out they were introduced in the 1990s. Ministers drew up plans to change the contract in 2012, but talks broke down in 2014.

They restarted at the end of last year at the conciliation service Acas but a deal could not be reached and so ministers announced in February they would be imposing the contract from this summer. There are two legal challenges to that imposition which are now being planned, one by the British Medical Association and another by campaign group Just Health.

Click on link to read more

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-34775980

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Filed under: Hospital,

Mum with breast cancer urges women to trust their instincts – Doctors told her not to worry

Kirsten Chisholm with Ashley

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JUST eight short months ago, she couldn’t have been happier as she became a mum for the second time.

But by the end of last year, Kirsten Chisholm’s mood had turned after she discovered a lump on her breast. It was painless and doctors told her not to worry – but as a trained medic herself, the 28-year-old nurse knew deep down that something was wrong. Given that breast cancer is uncommon in her age group, she had to wait almost three months to see a specialist.

That meant it was March before she was given the devastating diagnosis, not only confirming her worst fears but revealing that the disease had already spread to her lymph nodes. Kirsten, who works at the Sick Kids, is now preparing to undergo a mastectomy and faces gruelling treatment.

And today she warned other young women who recognise her story to follow their instinct if they feel something isn’t right

Click on the link to read more

http://www.scotsman.com/news/mum-with-breast-cancer-urges-women-to-trust-their-instincts-1-4089771?

Filed under: Cancer, ,

Second NHS whistleblower tsar departs as Office of National Guardian sinks further into ‘crisis’

David Bell’s shock move back to his old NHS job follows the resignation of his boss, Dame Eileen Sills, before she even started work

Health secretary Jeremy Hunt’s vow to protect medics who expose patient safety fears has hit a fresh setback. The UK’s new deputy NHS whistleblowing tsar has left after less than six weeks in the role.

David Bell’s abrupt move back to his old NHS job follows the resignation of his boss, Dame Eileen Sills. Campaigners say the latest exit is a sign that the new Office of the National Guardian – due to open last Friday – is in a “crisis” that means patients “will suffer”. It was to be a centre-piece of Mr Hunt’s pledge to protect whistleblowers following the Stafford Hospital scandal.

Dr Minh Alexander, who was forced to quit after she exposed suicides and abuse at a mental health trust in Cambridgeshire, said of Mr Bell’s departure: “This shows the Office of the National Guardian is in crisis. “I am not surprised – the design of the office has been flawed. What is needed is a truly independent body. “It is patients who will suffer if the Government continues to insist upon flawed half measures.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/second-nhs-whistleblower-tsar-quits-7683601

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Deputy National Guardian David Bell has exited his position

Filed under: Whistleblowing,

NHS whistle-blower told she was ‘too honest’ to work for the health service

An NHS whistle-blower who raised concerns about patient safety was told she was “too honest” to work for the organisation, The Telegraph can disclose.

Maha Yassaie, chief pharmacist at the now defunct Berkshire West Primary Care Trust, was told by a human resources consultant that her “values” made it difficult to work for the health service.

The investigator, Kelvin Cheatle, who was brought in from a private law firm to examine bullying claims and has carried out several similar inquiries for other NHS trusts, told the whistle-blower during a meeting: “If I had your values I would find it very difficult to work in the NHS”, according to a transcript of the conversation. The independence of the consultant who made the comments has also been called into question since the conclusion of his investigation, when it emerged that he appeared to coach witnesses during the inquiry.

Mrs Yassaie was subsequently sacked from the Trust. However, following an employment tribunal in 2014, the whistle-blower was awarded £375,000 by the NHS, and the Department of Health was forced to admit that “the investigation and disciplinary processes… were, in some respects, flawed”.

The disclosures about the investigation into Mrs Yassaie after she raised concerns will fuel fears that NHS whistle-blowers are not treated fairly.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/04/03/nhs-whistle-blower-told-she-was-too-honest-to-work-for-the-healt/

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Maha Yassaie at her home in Buckinghamshire

Filed under: Whistleblowing, ,

NHS has 70,000 fewer staff after new headcount

Official numbers of doctors, nurses and midwives were inflated, latest figures show

The NHS, already struggling to meet rising demand with a chronic lack of staff, has 70,000 fewer personnel working for it than ministers have previously believed, new official figures show. Its own data collection experts have found that the official head count of the number of people staffing frontline services, which was only produced in December, inflated its workforce.

At the time, a total of 1,083,545 health professionals were said to be working in the 228 NHS trusts and 209 GP-led local clinical commissioning groups across England. But the NHS’s Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) now says that the true number was 1,014,218. That means the NHS had 69,317 fewer staff last September than the 1.1 million that ministers identified in December, including just over 15,000 fewer nurses, midwives and health visitors and 3,000 fewer doctors.

“These figures reveal that the staffing crisis in the NHS is actually far worse than we had feared,” said Heidi Alexander, Labour’s shadow health secretary. “Patients will rightly be concerned that there are 18,000 fewer doctors and nurses working in the NHS than ministers had thought only four months ago.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/apr/02/nhs-staffing-crisis-70000-go-missing

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, , , ,

Terminally ill patient tells ITV News: I want to die at home – hospitals don’t care as much

As an audit found “unacceptable” variation in some aspects of end of life care in England, one terminally ill patient told ITV News that it is better for dying patients to be cared for at home or in hospices.

Kathleen Wickremer was diagnosed with cancer three years ago which has spread to her lungs and is now terminal. She cares deeply about being at home with her family for her final weeks, and says the prospect of dying in hospital makes her feel very sad.

Click on the link to watch her interview with ITV

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-03-31/hospitals-dont-care-as-much-about-the-dying-says-terminally-ill-patient/?

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Filed under: Hospital,

Mother whose son killed himself ‘let down’ by mental heath services

A mother whose son plunged to his death from a bridge hours after threatening to do so says he was let down by mental health services.

Tyler Smith died after suffering horrendous injuries following the 100ft fall from Stockport Viaduct. Deborah Cooper, 47, said her son had made multiple threats to jump from the viaduct to police and mental health staff hours earlier – and had tried to kill himself four times in 48 hours.

Tyler, 19, was discharged from Stepping Hill hospital by Pennine Care staff six hours before the fall after being admitted following a prescription drug overdose. He had earlier tried to strangle himself in a police cell when he was detained for stealing paracetamol after escaping from hospital. After returning to Stepping Hill, medics discharged Tyler with a prescription for three-days worth of medication. This was despite numerous suicide attempts in the previous two days and threats he would jump from the viaduct.

He downed the pills and fell from the viaduct hours later on October 9, 2014. Tyler died of his injuries a week later at Wythenshawe hospital.  His death was ruled accidental after a coroner was told by a police officer he slipped from the bridge.

Mrs Cooper accused police of failing to tell mental health staff Tyler had tried to kill himself when he was detained – and slammed officers for arresting him in the first place. She said he should have been sectioned under the Mental Health Act as he was considered ‘high risk’.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.itv.com/news/granada/2016-03-28/mother-whose-son-killed-himself-let-down-by-mental-heath-services/

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Tyler Smith

Filed under: Mental Health,

Funding research into and supporting those affected by genetic heart conditions in children

My cousins grandson Max 10 years old, died from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). My cousins son David has started an awareness campaign to this invisible disease. Please listen to her son David (Max’s father’s) interview on BBC London and help and support. Thank you, Joanna  

Max’s Foundation was set up in memory of Max Schiller http://www.maxsfoundation.org.uk/

A happy 10-year-old boy, who very suddenly and tragically passed away in January 2015 from an undetected heart condition known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM).

The family of Max’s purpose is to help fund research both into the detection of genetic heart conditions such as HCM in children and the management of these conditions. They are also aiming to help to provide support for these children and their families

Please click on the link to hear the interview from BBC London’s Eddie Nestor with David Schiller

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03m3r4k Scroll to 1.48 seconds

Or Dropbox

https://www.dropbox.com/s/2td1cxzxsivysm0/Max%20Schiller%20.wav?dl=0

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Max Schiller

Filed under: Uncategorized, ,

Nursing training places shortfall revealed in report “sneaked out” before Parliament’s Easter break

Thanks to the release of a Migration Advisory Committee report, it’s been uncovered that a tenth of the essential nursing training spots have been commissioned

A report which critics claim has been “sneaked out” on the day Parliament broke up for Easter revealed the Government has only commissioned a tenth of the nurse training places said to be needed. The Migration Advisory Committee report said that Health Education England had recommended an extra 3,000 places in 2016/17. But because of cuts which were made in the spending review, it said it had only commissioned 331 places.

Shadow Health Minister Justin Madders said: “This report, sneaked out on the last day before Easter, is further proof that the Tories are failing NHS nurses and failing patients .”

Last year it was revealed that the NHS had lost 1,200 senior nurses since Tories came to power – and fears were voiced that it could have serious impact on patient safety. Community matrons – who organise care outside hospital – dropped from 1,536 to 1,214. The total number of NHS matrons in England has fallen from 6,338 to 5,133. And, as the NHS tried to save £22billion, hospitals have slashed senior nursing posts or failed to replace those who are retiring.

The Mirror 23:01, 26 MAR 2016 By Keir Mudie

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Filed under: Hospital, ,

The number of ‘serious untoward incidents’ in the Welsh NHS has doubled in four years

The figures have renewed calls for the Welsh Government to hold an independent ‘Keogh-style’ inquiry into standards of care

The number of incidents in NHS hospitals which resulted in severe harm or avoidable deaths to patients has more than doubled in the past four years, it has been revealed. New figures show that 945 so-called ‘serious untoward incidents’ (SUI) were reported in 2014-15 compared to 414 in 2011-12 – a rise of 128.3%. But the Welsh Government said the number of incidents had increased because it asked the Welsh NHS to widen its scope to include infections and high-grade pressure ulcers.

The Welsh Conservatives, who uncovered the figures, have renewed calls for the Welsh Government to hold an independent “Keogh-style” inquiry into standards of care. Shadow Health Minister Darren Millar AM said: “These figures highlight a growing number of shocking failings in care in the Labour-run Welsh NHS.

“Incidents such as these where patients could come to serious harm or death are avoidable and should never happen. “The fact that they are rising and have increased threefold in some health boards in recent years is very concerning and provides further evidence of the impact of Labour’s record-breaking cuts on the NHS budget in Wales. “One avoidable death is one too many and the alarming rate at which these incidents are being reported to the Health Minister suggests that there are problems which need to be urgently addressed.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/health/number-serious-untoward-incidents-welsh-11092637

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Filed under: NHS Blunders, ,

NHS junior doctors who turn whistleblowers risk ‘career suicide’ reveals a doctor who did it

Dr Chris Day raised concerns about what he believed was poor care but soon discovered that his commitment was unwelcome

Junior doctors risk losing their jobs if they raise concerns about poor care, according to one young medic. Chris Day, 31, said he was removed from consultant training in 2014 after alerting bosses to dangerously low staffing levels on his intensive care unit.

Dr Day, who worked at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in South East London, said: “They took away my training number and without that you are out. No reason was given and I had no way of appealing.” He tried to take his case to a tribunal, but last week an appeal ruled junior doctors’ contracts are not protected under whistleblowing rules. Dr Day, now working as a locum, is seeking legal advice.
He said: “It’s saying if you are one of 54,000 junior doctors and blow the whistle, you have no protection.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/nhs-junior-doctors-who-turn-7635466

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Dr Chris Day who turned whistleblower found out that it wasn’t appreciated

Filed under: Whistleblowing, ,

Francis adviser to lead inquiry into ‘heart breaking’ baby death – BY SHAUN LINTERN

An adviser to the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust public inquiry will lead an investigation into the death and treatment of a baby girl whose case exposed a “regulatory gap” in the NHS.

Professor Peter Hutton, a senior consultant anaesthetist from the University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust and a former chair of the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges and President of the Royal College of Anaesthetists, will conduct the inquiry into the death and treatment of baby Elizabeth Dixon. She was born prematurely at Frimley Park Hospital in 2000 and was left with permanent brain damage after hospital staff failed to monitor or treat her high blood pressure. Less than a year later she died of suffocation when a newly qualified nurse failed to keep her breathing tube clear.

The cause of her brain damage only emerged in 2013 and her parents have a dossier of evidence suggesting their daughter’s poor care was covered up by senior clinicians in a number of organisations. Health secretary Jeremy Hunt ordered an inquiry in September last year after Nursing Times’ sister titleHealth Service Journal highlighted the reluctance of national bodies, including NHS England and the health service ombudsman, to take on the case.

Click on the link to read more from The Nursing Times

An adviser to the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust public inquiry will lead an investigation into the death and treatment of a baby girl

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Elizabeth Dixon

Filed under: NHS Blunders, ,

NHS Scotland whistleblowing line gets extra year – BBC News

A confidential whistleblowing line for NHS staff in Scotland has been extended for a year.

The Alert Line is designed to provide independent support for anyone wanting to raise concerns about practices within the health service. The Scottish government will also introduce a new Whistleblowing Officer to scrutinise the handling of cases.

Health Secretary Shona Robison said she wanted staff to be able to “speak up without fear”. Ms Robison added: “I have always been clear that health boards must ensure that it is safe and acceptable for staff to speak up about any concerns they may have, particularly in relation to patient safety.

“We will continue to work with the NHS across Scotland to ensure an open and transparent reporting culture where all staff have the confidence to speak up.”

The National Confidential Alert Line will be extended for one year from 1 August 2016 to 31 July 2017.

The phoneline, 0800 008 6112, will pass any concerns raised by employees on to the employer or the relevant regulatory organisation for investigation.

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Filed under: Whistleblowing,

Staffing crisis as nurses quit NHS – More than 1,260 have left the NHS in the past year alone

More than 1,260 have left the NHS in the past year alone and health chiefs fear the exodus will grow as experienced staff take advantage of early retirement clauses in their contracts.

NHS chief executive Simon Stevens has also warned that the benefit of the £1billion pledged by David Cameron is unlikely to be felt until 2018. NHS boss Jim Mackey told the NHS Confederation Mental Health Network annual conference that “there is no cavalry coming”. Nursing recruitment is in crisis with vacancy levels averaging 10 per cent and a shortfall of 25,000 posts leading to huge bills for agency nurses to plug gaps. The Government has scrapped education bursaries so student nurses now apply for loans like other students.

The impact of the changes is likely to be felt more acutely in the mental health sector where recruits tend to be older and will struggle to afford the fees and student loan debts. Howard Catton, of the Royal College of Nursing, said: “This is a massive roll of the dice.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/653954/Staffing-crisis-nurses-quit-NHS-health-Britain-mental-health

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Filed under: NHS, ,

Scarlet fever: Once-feared Victorian disease infecting hundreds of children a week

Illness associated with the Victorian era now infects hundreds of children a week, with no apparent reason for its return

Thousands of children are being infected with scarlet fever as the once feared Victorian disease, a leading cause of infant deaths in the early 20th century, makes a startling comeback.

Cases of scarlet fever have reached a 50-year high, with more than 17,000 cases confirmed last year – the highest since the 1960s. There have been more than 6,100 cases since September last year, and the peak season is from now until the middle of April. Around 600 cases are currently being recorded each week. Family doctors across the country are now being told to keep watch for scarlet fever by Public Health England, and parents are being told how to spot the symptoms.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/fTIaKQ

What are the symptoms? Click on the link

http://goo.gl/Dv9Lj3

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Filed under: NHS, ,

Newborn baby left dying alone at the Royal Free Hospital because doctors thought he had died

A newborn baby was left dying alone on a resuscitation table after doctors mistakenly gave him up for dead and medical staff ignored his gasps for breath, an inquest heard.

Baby Sebastian Sparrow revived himself an hour and a half after his parents were told by medics at the Royal Free Hospital that he had died. But Sebastian was too badly brain damaged to be saved, and died two days later after being transferred to University College Hospital. Coroner Mary Hassell was critical of several medical staff throughout last week’s inquest, and said that they must have realised the baby’s “agonal gasps” meant that he was “dying, and not dead”.

Sebastian was born by caesarean section on November 6 2013 after his mother, Sally Sparrow, experienced a prolonged labour. He was expected to be a healthy baby as no problems had been detected throughout the pregnancy.  It was suggested during the inquest that he may have sustained brain damage during the caesarean delivery as it took three attempts by different obstetricians to deliver the baby.

In a statement, Mrs Sparrow, a solicitor, and her husband, Jamie, an accountant, said they were left with “no real understanding of what had happened” after the mistaken diagnosis of death.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/40v7n9

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Filed under: NHS Blunders,

Are you willing to talk to the ITV with a prebudget news program illustrating how the disability benefits cuts will affect vulnerable people

From Susan Tee… I have been contacted again by ITV and Penny Marshall and her team with an urgent request this afternoon. She wonders if any of our members would be willing to talk to them in order to help with a prebudget news program illustrating how the disability benefits cuts will affect vulnerable people. She is looking at filming around Liverpool tomorrow afternoon (17th March 2016) and can travel a little if you can’t. Please contact the ITV team directly on the number below”

Call Reshma on 07966504154

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Penny Marshall

Filed under: Disabilities,

Health officials have ‘failed brain tumour patients and their families for decades’

Damning parliamentary report finds patients are let down at every stage from diagnosis to treatment

Health officials have “failed brain tumour patients and their families for decades” and need to invest more in research into the condition, a damning parliamentary report has concluded. Patients with brain tumours are let down at every stage from diagnosis to treatment, according to the Petitions Committee – which said it had little reason to believe the Department of Health had “grasped the seriousness of the issue”. MPs on the committee criticised the Government for not taking the lead in identifying gaps in research and providing funding for new studies which could help save lives.

The Petitions Committee concluded that funding for brain tumour research is inadequate and not given sufficient priority. Brain Tumour Research said just 1 per cent of the national spend on cancer research is allocated to studies into brain tumours.

The report comes after a bereaved sister set up a petition calling for more research into brain tumours – it has since been signed by more than 120,000 people. Maria Lester began campaigning after her brother Stephen Realf died from a brain tumour aged just 26. “We are going to keep shouting and keep getting louder until someone in Government finally hears what we are saying and does something about it,” she said.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/98tshp

Brain-Tumour-iStock

Filed under: NHS,

Britain’s care homes are being turned into complex financial instruments

The extraordinary story of how one care conglomerate uses opaque corporate structures and a web of financial tools to suck wealth from the care of Britain’s most vulnerable.

Adult social care in the UK is in crisis. This much we are told by those in the sector and this much we can see in the statistics. To cite but a few of these: around 1.86 million people over the age of 50 are not getting the care they need; approximately 1.5 million people perform over 50 hours unpaid care per week; and the proportion of GDP the UK spends on social care is among the lowest in the OECD, with budgets having undergone an overall reduction of over 30 per cent since 2010.

Reflecting on the severity of the situation, Ian Smith, chairman of the largest care home chain in the UK, Four Seasons Healthcare, recently declared himself to be ‘embarrassed to be British at the state of our health and social care.’ As with the NHS, a mood of impending catastrophe hangs heavy over social care.

Yet whilst attention has overwhelmingly been focused on the impact of austerity in reducing levels of state support, something murkier and altogether more complicated is going on in the shadows.

According to a groundbreaking new report by the research organisation CRESC, large care home chains – which account for around a quarter of the industry – are rife with dubious financial engineering, tax avoidance, and complex business models designed to shift risks and costs from care home owners on to staff, the state and private payers. Where Does the Money Go? Financialised Chains and the Crisis in Residential Care is a stark warning that the problems of adult social care in the UK run deeper than a lack of state funding, damaging though this is.

Click on the link to read more

http://linkis.com/opendemocracy.net/6rNSm

Click on the link to read the report

Britain’s care homes are being turned into complex financial instruments

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Filed under: Care Homes,

Jo Taylor – abc After Breast Cancer Diagnosis – Speaks on BBC North West

Researchers in Manchester have discovered a new way of treating a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer, which in some cases has seen tumours disappear in just 11 days.

Jo Taylor is interviewed by BBC North West at a Cancer conference in Trafford, she is currently about to go through her 3rd round of chemotherapy. She is also the founder of the website: abc After Breast Cancer Diagnosis   http://www.abcdiagnosis.co.uk/  bringing an awareness and support to breast cancer sufferers providing news and information from the UK and around the world

Click on the link to watch the interview

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Jo Taylor

Filed under: Cancer,

Mencap worker suspended over man in wheelchair piled with shopping

A picture shared on Facebook appears to show female carer smoking next to an elderly man with bags piled on his lap

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A Mencap support worker has been suspended after a photograph emerged apparently showing shopping bags piled on a client in a wheelchair, obscuring his vision.

The learning disability charity said it was appalled by the image, which shows a female carer smoking and talking on the phone next to an elderly man, who has several bags on a lap tray on his wheelchair. The image was posted to the charity’s Facebook page by Charlotte Shaw, who was concerned after seeing the image shared online.

“One of your staff in the Leicestershire area smoking whilst on the phone in Leicester shoving all her shopping bags on top of him with no care in the world,” she wrote in a post accompanying the photograph. “I don’t think she should work with vulnerable people,” she added. Steve Baker, regional director of services at Mencap, confirmed the charity had suspended the worker.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/kw8qeA

Filed under: Disabilities,

Breast Cancer Trial Kills Tumours In 11 Days

Using Herceptin together with another powerful breast cancer drug before surgery could shrink or destroy tumours in just 11 days, a study has found.

Around a quarter of women given a combined treatment of drugs in a clinical study saw their tumours shrink or disappear. Some patients may be spared chemotherapy if they are given a combination of the drugs Tyverb (lapatinib) and Herceptin (trastuzumab) immediately after diagnosis, according to the research by a team of British doctors.

The medics, who presented their study to experts at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Amsterdam, said their findings had “groundbreaking potential”. Some 257 women with an aggressive form of cancer – HER2 – were involved in the clinical trial and either received no treatment, one of the drugs or a combination of them.

Around a quarter of the women on the combined treatment saw their tumours shrink or disappear.

Click on the link to read more

http://news.sky.com/story/1657858/breast-cancer-trial-kills-tumours-in-11-days?

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Filed under: Cancer, ,

Jedi, the diabetes-sniffing dog, saves sleeping 7-year-old’s life in middle of night

WATCH: Meet Jedi, the dog that watches over type-1 diabetic child every night while his family sleeps.

A diabetic alert dog named Jedi may have saved the life of a sleeping seven-year-old boy after the black Labrador alerted its owners that the child’s blood sugar levels dropped to dangerously low levels in the middle of the night.

Luke Nuttall was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was two-years-old, and his blood sugar levels need to be monitored around the clock. To help keep tabs on Luke’s levels, the Nuttall family acquired a dog trained to monitor blood sugar through smell.

Click on the link to read and watch the video

Jedi, the diabetes-sniffing dog, saves sleeping 7-year-old’s life in middle of night

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“This is a picture of Jedi saving his boy,” Dorrie Nuttall wrote on Facebook.

Filed under: Uncategorized, ,

Plans to end the cover-up culture in the NHS

Health Secretary will announce plans to improve NHS safety and transparency at the first ministerial-level Global Patient Safety Summit

The 2-day summit (on 9 and 10 March 2016) brings together health ministers, senior delegates and expert clinicians from across the world including Margaret Chan, Director General of the World Health Organisation.

Speaking at the summit, Jeremy Hunt will describe a range of new measures including an independent Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch and legal protection for anyone giving information following a hospital mistake. Legal ‘safe spaces’ will mean those co-operating with investigations will be supported and protected to speak up to help bring new openness to the NHS’s response to tragic mistakes. Families will be told the full truth more quickly and the NHS will become better at learning when things go wrong and acting upon it.

Jeremy Hunt will also announce that, from April 2018, expert medical examiners will independently review and confirm the cause of all deaths. This was originally recommended by the Shipman Inquiry, and subsequently by Robert Francis following the events of Mid Staffs. If any death needs to be investigated and if there is cause for concern, appropriate action will be taken.

The current system has remained largely unchanged for over 50 years and leads to significant variations in the number of deaths that are investigated. The changes announced by the Health Secretary will reassure the public that if things go wrong, the causes will be identified and investigated.

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt said:

A huge amount of progress has been made in improving our safety culture following the tragic events at Mid Staffs but to deliver a safer NHS for patients, 7 days a week, we need to unshackle ourselves from a quick-fix blame culture and acknowledge that sometimes bad mistakes can be made by good people.

It is a scandal that every week there are potentially 150 avoidable deaths in our hospitals and it is up to us all to make the need for whistleblowing and secrecy a thing of the past as we reform the NHS and its values and move from blaming to learning.

Today we take a step forward to building a new era of openness and the safest healthcare system in the world.

Click on the link to read more

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/plans-to-end-the-cover-up-culture-in-the-nhs

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Filed under: NHS, ,

NHS child mental health money ‘missing’ despite investment

Some mental health trusts in England have seen “no significant investment” in psychiatric services for children despite government plans to overhaul provision, say experts.

Last summer ministers said they would invest an additional £143m in the services this financial year. The Mental Health Network suspects the funding has been used to support other NHS services. NHS England says it can show where the money has been allocated. The additional funding was part of a £1.25bn investment over five years announced by the chancellor in the Budget in March 2015.

While campaigners expected £250m to be made available this year, the Department of Health said in August that only £143m would be spent, as providers did not have the capacity to spend any more. However, the body representing mental health trusts says it has seen little of even that reduced amount.

How the £143m was allocated:

  • £75m – Clinical Commissioning Groups
  • £21m – Health Education England
  • £15m – Perinatal care (£11m underspend)
  • £12m – Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme
  • £10m – Hospital beds
  • £5m – Administrative costs for NHS England (£4m) and Department of Health (£1m)
  • £2m – Improving care for young people in the justice system
  • £2m – Joint programme with Department for Education to improve services in schools
  • £1m – Support for children with learning disabilities in long-term care

Click on the link to read more

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-35747167

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Filed under: NHS,

Mum dies after NHS 111 call handler cancelled her ambulance when it was just one minute from her home

A WOMAN was found dead in her living room ten hours after an NHS 111 call handler cancelled an ambulance when it was just one minute away from her home, an inquest heard today.

Tragic Ann Walters, 61, died after a nurse called off the emergency response team which had been heading to see her. A later investigation found Pete Richardson had ‘not demonstrated an understanding of heart failure’ when dealing with the call. At the hearing he confessed he made a mistake and apologised to the family. The inquest was told Mrs Walters called the NHS 111 service on December 28, 2014, asking for a doctor to be sent to her home.

Her breathlessness caused an initial call handler concern, so she was classed as an emergency. He was told by Mrs Walters – who at the time only had months to live – that she had a heart defect, and so dialled 999 himself for an ambulance to be sent to her home despite her asking to see a doctor instead. A crew was initially dispatched from Waterlooville to her home nearby in Portsmouth, but within four minutes a different ambulance was sent from Queen Alexandra Hospital in the city as it was nearer her home. However, in the meantime Mrs Walters was called at 8.24am by Pete Richardson, a qualified nurse and clinical support desk practitioner for the 111 service.

After talking with her, he took the decision to stand down the ambulance which was just one minute from her home.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/xeRfI7

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Mrs Walters (left) was found dead by her son Lawrence pictured here with his sister Felicity

Filed under: NHS Blunders,

NHS failing to answer patients’ questions, warns Ombudsman

The NHS too often fails to answer patients’ questions and forces them to contact the Ombudsman service for answers, according to a report  published today.

The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman’s latest snapshot of cases report included many cases where questions about mistakes or oversights by the health service were unanswered by the NHS itself. The report contains a snapshot of 40 case summaries of the 544 investigations of unresolved complaints that the Ombudsman completed investigating in April, May and June 2015.

Around 80% of the cases investigated by the Ombudsman are about the NHS and the rest are about UK government departments and other organisations. The latest cases included that of one family that was forced to bring their complaint to the Ombudsman service, following the death of their nine-year-old son from sepsis after he was wrongly discharged from hospital.

Click on the link to read more

https://www.onmedica.com/NewsArticle.aspx?id=d014cf40-172b-4ca0-8c3a-b4a927f037f6

Click on the link to download report

Selected summaries of investigations by PHSO Apr-to-June-2015

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Filed under: NHS Blunders,

‘No criminal prosecutions’ of individuals over Stafford Hospital deaths

No doctor, nurse or manager will ever be held accountable for the hundreds of deaths at Stafford Hospital between 2005 and 2009. A report released today, thought to be the very last one into high mortality rates there, confirmed no criminal prosecutions of individuals will take place.

But some of the families involved say this police report tells them nothing new and is a waste of money. The family of John Moore Robinson who died in 2006 have spoken to our health correspondent Stacey Foster.

Click on the link to see the video report by the family of John Moore Robinson who died in 2006

http://www.itv.com/news/central/2016-03-01/no-criminal-prosecutions-over-stafford-hospital-deaths/

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John Moore Robinson

Filed under: NHS Blunders, ,

Bullied into silence: NHS staff survey shows fears about whistleblowing

A poll of one quarter of NHS staff shows rising levels of bullying and widespread concerns about a failure to listen to those who raise concerns about safety

Just one in four NHS doctors and nurses believes whistleblowers are treated fairly by hospitals, according to a mass survey which shows rising complaints about staff bullying.

The poll of 300,000 NHS staff – around one in four of all workers – found widespread concerns about treatment of whistleblowers. In total, less than one in three said hospitals encouraged them to speak up when safety is at risk. Just 24 per cent said colleagues who became involved in a safety incident were treated fairly. Doctors and nurses said that when blunders or “near-misses” were reported, hospitals failed to learn from them.

Just 23 per cent of staff said that their hospitals took action to ensure failings were not repeated.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/journalists/laura-donnelly/12170705/Bullied-into-silence-NHS-staff-survey-shows-fears-about-whistleblowing.html

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Dr Raj Mattu, a cardiologist, was suspended for eight years, then sacked, after warning that patients were dying because of cost-cutting practices introduced by a Coventry hospital

Filed under: Whistleblowing, ,

Ambulances referred by NHS 111 service deliberately delayed under secret trust policy, inquiry finds

Probe concludes decision to embark on the plan which affected 20,000 patients was taken by boss of South East Coast Ambulance trust

Ambulances dispatched after people called the NHS 111 helpline were deliberately delayed under a secret policy authorised by a senior health service executive, a leaked report seen by The Daily Telegraph reveals.

Up to 20,000 patients were subject to deliberate delays under the covert operation, which forced high-risk cases in the South East to automatically wait up to twice as long if their call was referred from the helpline. An inquiry into the scandal, which was exposed by this newspaper in October, has concluded that the decision to embark on the plan was taken by the chief executive of South East Coast Ambulance trust.

The draft report says Paul Sutton ordered the changes despite direct pleas to him from senior managers raising concerns about the dangers of the scheme.  The “forensic review” ordered by regulators, due to be published shortly, is one of three separate probes into the scandal. It details how the secret policy came to be introduced, without the knowledge of the trust’s board, without any risk assessment and in clear breach of NHS rules.

A separate inquiry, which will report later this year, is examining the extent of harm caused by the protocols to the thousands of patients affected. At least 11 deaths have been linked to the rogue protocols.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/o10AOG

F5A675 NHS South East Coast Ambulance parked by some grass while the crew take a break., in South East England, UK.

Filed under: NHS, ,

Four Southport and Ormskirk hospital bosses paid £200,000 while suspended for six months

Southport MP John Pugh describes this as an “atrocious waste” of NHS money

Four Southport Hospital bosses have been paid a total of £200,000 since they were suspended on full pay six months ago – a situation described by the local MP as an “atrocious waste of much-needed NHS money”.

Jonathan Parry, the Southport and Ormskirk hospital trust’s chief executive, and three other senior officials were placed on leave after whistleblower complaints last August.  The exact nature of the allegations against the four has never been revealed. Chief operating officer Sheilah Finnegan, human resources director Sharon Partington and deputy director of performance, Richard McCarthy, were all excluded alongside Mr Parry.

The four have been paid at least £200,000 in total since being suspended – described by Southport MP John Pugh as an “atrocious waste of much-needed NHS money”. The trust admitted Mr Parry has been paid £75,000 in salary since he was suspended around 200 days ago. Meanwhile, Ms Finnegan has been handed £55,000 over the same period and Ms Partington has received £45,000. It is not known exactly how much Mr McCarthy has been paid while on suspension, but his salary band ranges from £65,900 to £81,600 a year – suggesting a cost to the public purse of between £33,000 and £41,000 over six months.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/four-southport-ormskirk-hospital-bosses-10936107

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Jonathan Parry, Sharon Partington and Sheilah Finnegan, three senior managers at Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust who are on suspension

 

 

Filed under: NHS, ,

How do you know you have got dementia? A group of people share their experiences of diagnosis

Grief, guilt, disbelief, denial, and even relief ­seven people living with dementia share how they felt the day they were diagnosed, and how they have come to terms with it since.

Being diagnosed with the neurological condition dementia terrifies many people who think their world is falling in. Many people have feelings which range from despair to denial, to guilt and relief.

A special project to try and raise awareness of the realities of dementia diagnosis has taken the stories of eight people from around the UK and asked them how they felt the day they were diagnosed.

They talk about how their feelings progressed and how they came to terms with their diagnosis and how they re-built their lives.

Click on the link to read their stories

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/real-life-stories/how-you-know-you-dementia-7419262?

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Filed under: Dementia, ,

Neglect played part in death of mother after medics missed blood clot

Neglect contributed to the death of a mother-of-two who died after New Cross Hospital staff failed to detect a blood clot, an inquest heard.

Marie Rollason might have survived if the clot had been detected earlier, the hearing was told. Mrs Rollason visited the hospital’s A&E department twice in the weeks before her death on December 29 last year. The 43-year-old had been suffering from collapses, but these were attributed to a head injury sustained after she tripped and fell in the bathroom of her Wolverhampton home earlier that month.

Giving evidence at the inquest, consultant Rakesh Khanna said abnormalities in the results of an ECG test were a ‘potential red-flag’ – but the junior doctor who assessed Mrs Rollason decided she could be discharged without further investigations following discussions with a locum consultant. Dr Khanna added had the clot been treated following the test performed six days before Mrs Rollason’s death, she ‘more likely than not’ would have survived. But he also explained she had not displayed the predominant symptoms classically linked to a pulmonary embolism.

Coroner Zafar Siddique concluded: “On the balance of probabilities, had further tests been ordered and Mrs Rollason had been kept under observation, a basic medical procedure would have detected the pulmonary embolism and more likely than not she would have survived.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.expressandstar.com/news/2016/02/23/neglect-played-part-in-death-of-mother-after-medics-missed-blood-clot/

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Marie on holiday in Bulgaria

Filed under: NHS Blunders,

Stricken A&E patients told ‘go home unless you’re dying’ as hospital is hit by seven-hour delays

North Middlesex Hospital put a message over a Tannoy advising people to go home unless they had a life-threatening illness

Stricken NHS patients were left waiting for up to SEVEN HOURS on hospital trolleys leaving medics with no option but to say: “Go home if you’re not dying.” In a disturbing new low for our over-stretched health service, the Sunday People can reveal a hospital put a message over a Tannoy advising people to go home.

Patients were told: “We would ask anyone who doesn’t have a life-threatening illness to go home and come back in the morning.” The extraordinary situation unfolded at the North Middlesex Hospital in Edmonton, north London on Friday night.

Tonight a spokesman for the hospital confirmed they had to issue the mayday alert because 450 casualties arrived during one shift. One eyewitness who saw the chaos unfold said he witnessed more than 100 people in the waiting room. He said at one point there were a dozen patients on trolleys lining the wall along the department because all cubicles full.

Many had been waiting on trolleys for several hours. At 11pm a message went on the tannoy saying that the wait to see a doctor was eight hours for adults and six hours in children’s A&E, leading to disbelief among those there.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/stricken-ae-patients-told-go-7409553

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Go home: There were seven-hour delays in the A&E department at North Middlesex Hospital

Filed under: Uncategorized, , ,

Secretly filmed carer found guilty of abusing 87-year-old dementia patient

A carer has been found guilty of ill treating an elderly patient who suffered with dementia after being secretly filmed aiming blows towards him.

Pauline Demaurie was caught on camera moving her arms towards 87-year-old Edward Bridge as he cried for help and moving her head close to his face, which the prosecution said was done in a threatening manner. She was also heard threatening to pinch Mr Bridge, who in addition to dementia suffered Paget’s disease which meant he could feel pain at the slightest touch. Though she admitted she may have slapped his arm, Demaurie claimed she had only being joking with the patient and had never abused him.

But the jury at Wolverhampton Crown Court took just an hour and 23 minutes to find her guilty.  Demaurie, aged 40, of California Road, Tividale, wiped away tears after the verdict had been delivered. She was ordered to carry out 100 hours of unpaid work as part of a 12-month community order.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.expressandstar.com/news/crime/2016/02/22/secretly-filmed-carer-found-guilty-of-abusing-87-year-old-dementia-patient/

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Pauline Demaurie at court

Filed under: Care Homes, Named & Shamed, ,

Agency nurse paid £100 an hour at Walsall Manor Hospital

An agency nurse picked up £1,100 for a 11 and a half-hour shift at Walsall Manor Hospital, it has emerged.

Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust paid out more than £14.4 million to agency nurses and locum doctors in three years. The trust paid the nurse £337.25 for the five hours worked between 7pm and midnight at a night rate of £67.45.  The same nurse was then paid £766 for a six and a half-hour shift the next morning – an hourly rate of £117.95. The total payments to the agencies and locum doctors amounted to £14.4m between 2012 and 2015.

During this period there have been seven occasions where the trust paid more than £1,000 for a locum doctor to cover a shift. The highest payout for a locum doctor last year was £1,150 for a medicine and long terms conditions consultant who was on call for three days in March. The highest payout for the previous financial year was in November 2013 when a paediatric consultant was paid £1,417 for a 17-hour night shift.

In the 2014/15 financial year, the trust paid £2,310,000 to locum doctors and £3,335,000 to agency nurses – a total of £5,645,000. Both the 2014/15 and 13/14 figures are a huge increase on the £3,059,000 spent in 2012/13, including £1,627,000 on locum doctors and £1,432,000 on agency nurses.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.expressandstar.com/news/2016/02/20/agency-nurse-paid-100-an-hour-at-walsall-manor-hospital/

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Filed under: Hospital

NHS 111 helpline safety questioned by top paediatrician

A leading child health specialist has questioned whether England’s NHS 111 helpline is safe and effective for young children.

Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health president Prof Neena Modi said the system was unfair on call handlers, who are not medically trained. She said even clinicians would find it hard to assess small children by phone. NHS England acknowledged the importance of thorough training but said the royal colleges helped produce the protocols.

A report last month by NHS England described how NHS 111 missed chances to save 12-month-old William Mead, from Cornwall, who died in 2014 from blood poisoning following a chest infection after staff failed to recognise the seriousness of his condition. NHS England has said call handlers for the 111 service should be trained on how to recognise a complex call and when to call in clinical advice earlier.

The government has said this will happen as soon as possible. But the NHS England report concluded that if a medic had taken the final phone call, instead of an NHS 111 adviser using a computer system, they probably would have realised William’s “cries as a child in distress” meant he needed urgent medical attention.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-35614575

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William’s mother Melissa said she found out-of-hours services ‘chaotic’

Filed under: NHS Blunders, , ,

More than 1,000 NHS ‘never’ errors in four years

More than 1,100 patients have suffered from NHS “never events” – mistakes so serious they should never have happened – in the past four years.

Around 800 of these have either had the wrong area operated on or “foreign objects” such as gauzes, swabs, rubber gloves, scalpel blades or needles left inside them.

Some of the worst mistakes revealed by a Press Association investigation include:

  • A woman having her fallopian tubes removed instead of her appendix
  • A man having a testicle taken off instead of just the cyst on it
  • One woman having a kidney removed instead of an ovary
  • Another patient had a biopsy taken from their liver instead of their pancreas
  • Operations were carried out on the wrong hips, legs, eyes and knees
  • Blood transfusions with the wrong blood were given
  • Feeding tubes were put into patients’ lungs rather than their stomachs -which can prove fatal
  • Diabetic patients were not given insulin
  • Other patients were given the wrong type of implant or joint replacement
  • Patients were mixed up with others
  • Drug doses given out were far too high in some cases

Click on the link to read more

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-02-18/more-than-1-000-nhs-never-errors-in-four-years/?

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More than 800 people have had the wrong area operated on or ‘foreign objects’ left inside them.

Filed under: NHS Blunders,

Faye’s story – This is in memory of 2-year-old Faye- Meningitis Now

Many of you will have seen and signed the online petition calling for the Meningitis B vaccine to be given to all children, not just newborn babies.

This is in memory of 2-year-old Faye

Below, Faye’s mum Jenny tells her story and why she is campaigning for change.

“This is a photo of Faye, 2-years-old, who sadly lost her life to this dreadful disease. We campaign for change in her memory.” “Faye was taken to A&E with a rash on her forehead. She was then transferred by South Bank Retrieval Service to Evelina Children’s Hospital, where her heart stopped in the ambulance. They revived her and spent hours working on stabilising her.” “We were given a one per cent survival chance but she proved them wrong and carried on fighting.” “After a few days she seemed to have turned a corner, but the sepsis started to affect her more and the decision of limb removal was made. The extent of removal was massive, full leg amputation and one arm and plastic surgery.” “She was getting tired, her little body consumed by meningitis and sepsis (blood poisoning). We had to make the decision, a massive operation and she may die or we let her go peacefully on her own accord.” “We decided the latter and then watched our little girl slip away. At 9pm on February 14th she finally fell asleep forever. All this in only 11 days.”

“This is the link to the government petition calling for the Meningitis B vaccine to be given to ALL children, not just newborn babies –

https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/108072

“All children are at risk from this terrible infection, yet the Government plan to only vaccinate 2 to 5-month-olds. There needs to be a rollout programme to vaccinate all children, at least up to age 11. Meningococcal infections can be very serious, causing meningitis, septicaemia and death.” “In a few days we have seen this rise from a few hundred signatures to over 13,000 due to furious social media campaigns and also contacting some media.”

“Anything you can do to promote and support this cause is very welcome.”

Jenny, Faye’s mum

https://www.meningitisnow.org/support-us/news-centre/news-stories/fayes-story/

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Filed under: Uncategorized, ,

Asleep when they should be saving lives: Pictures of exhausted paramedic and call handler snoozing shame NHS’s out-of-hours hotline at UK’s worst-performing 111 centre

  • Photos at call centre where fatal errors were made in William Mead’s case
  • Baby died hours after a 111 call adviser failed to spot he was seriously ill
  • Ex-manager reveals concerns were ‘repeatedly raised’ about call handler
  • Health Secretary says Daily Mail’s new evidence will be ‘fully investigated’

They are the devastating images that shame the NHS out-of-hours service. Taken at the country’s worst-performing 111 centre, they show an exhausted paramedic and call handler fast asleep at their posts – unable to hear potentially life-or-death calls coming in from patients.

The pictures were taken at the same call centre where fatal errors were made in the case of baby William Mead, who died hours after a 111 call adviser failed to spot he was seriously ill.  They are revealed today as a former manager at the service lays bare the true scale of the blunders that surrounded the tragedy. Sarah Hayes reveals that ‘concerns had been repeatedly raised’ about the member of staff who took the call that led to William’s death – but he had never been suspended. She also says the failings at the 111 service that contributed to William’s death were by no means isolated, claiming that the call centre is frequently mired in chaos.  As well as staff falling asleep on the job, she claims, a string of serious blunders were covered up.

The revelations have been met with anger from the parents of William Mead. They had been given written assurances by the head of the 111 service that ‘no concerns’ had previously been raised over the call handler’s performance. Last night they demanded an urgent investigation.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/z0Ocgz

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Worn out: A woman paramedic asleep at the Dorset 111 centre (left) and her call handler colleague (right) – unable to hear potentially life-or-death calls coming in from patients

Filed under: NHS,

Pensioner dies of thirst in hospital after nurse ‘refused to give her water in case she wet the bed’

Edna Thompson, 85, was admitted to hospital with a rare eye condition – but died of severe dehydration and renal failure eight days later

Edna, a former librarian from Harrietsham, subsequently suffered severe dehydration and renal failure. She passed away just eight days after her admission to hospital last September. Now, Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust chief executive Glenn Douglas has admitted a catalogue of errors in the mother of three’s care and has apologised to her family.

Mr Douglas said an investigation found that Edna’s condition was exacerbated by the prescription of medication known to cause dehydration, including mannitol, used to lower eye pressure. It is usually prescribed for 48 hours – but was given to Edna five days in a row. Mr Douglas told the pensioner’s family: “I would like to offer an unreserved apology for the errors. “Regrettably we cannot alter the sad outcome. “However, I can assure you we have recognised the need to ensure this type of event does not occur again.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/pensioner-dies-thirst-hospital-after-7358823?ICID=FB_mirror_main

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Tragic: The pensioner was admitted to hospital with suspected malignant glaucoma – but passed away eight days later

Filed under: Hospital

Any families in East Yorkshire and Lincolnshire who put up cameras to monitor their loved ones in care homes. The BBC would like to hear from you

I have just been approached by The BBC Look North, Any families in East Yorkshire and Lincolnshire who put up cameras to monitor their loved ones. The BBC Look North and today are covering a story about whether CCTV cameras should be installed in care homes to monitor staff and residents

The BBC would like to hear from you, please pass on and email me asap at joannaslater2@gmail.com thanks

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Filed under: Uncategorized

London hospital trust heading for biggest overspend in NHS history

The biggest hospital trust in the country is set to run up a £134.9m deficit this year – by far the largest ever overspend in the history of the NHS.

Barts Health NHS Trust which runs four hospitals in east London, employs 15,000 people and serves an area containing 2.5 million people, is on course to have failed to balance its books by that margin when the NHS financial year ends on 31 March. Its overspend is 69% bigger than the trust’s £79.6m overspend – also a record at the time – in 2014-15.

Its grim financial predicament has been revealed in a parliamentary answer by the health minister, Alistair Burt, to Sadiq Khan, Labour London mayoral hopeful. Burt also revealed another London trust, London North West Healthcare NHS Trust, which operates four hospitals, had suffered such a sharp decline in its finances that it was due to end the year £88.3m in the red – the second biggest in NHS history and £63.4m worse than last year.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/feb/07/barts-london-hospital-trust-biggest-overspend-nhs-history

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Barts Health NHS Trust runs four hospitals in east London, including St Bartholomew’s (pictured).

Filed under: NHS, ,

PRESS RELEASE: Three Patient Safety campaigners Will Powell, Delilah Hesling and Jade Taylor, brought together through tragic circumstances which span 26 years met with the Secretary of State for Health, Mr Jeremy Hunt on 3rd February 2016

The purpose of the meeting was to express their concerns about the inept NHS complaint procedures and the appalling way in which whistle-blowers are treated.

Will Powell’s deceased son’s case identified the absence of legal Duty of Candour in healthcare back in 1996. Robbie’s case went to the High Court, Court of Appeal, House of Lords and the European Court of Human Rights, which ruled in May 2000: “Whilst it is arguable that doctors had a duty not to falsify medical records under the common law (Sir Donaldson MR’s “duty of candour”), before Powell v Boladz there was no binding decision of the courts as to the existence of such a duty. As the law stands now, however, doctors have no duty to give parents of a child who died as a result of their negligence a truthful account of the circumstances of the death, nor even to refrain from deliberately falsifying records.”
As a consequence of Robbie’s case and the efforts of the Powells’ campaign, to change this perverse law, there was a legal Duty of Candour introduced in November 2014.

In 2006 Jade Taylor’s late step father became caught up in the Mid Staffordshire NHS Disaster where an estimated 400-1200 people died unnecessarily. Following this Jade’s late mother was then admitted to Stafford Hospital’s A&E and Emergency Assessment Unit, in early 2008, where she received an appalling lack of care and treatment with nurses falsifying A&E waiting time breaches to meet hospital targets. As an NHS Manager Jade also has experience of raising patient safety concerns, which were later founded, and was a contributor to Sir Robert Francis’s Freedom to Speak-up Review.

Also in 2006 Delilah Hesling became an NHS whistle-blower and started to unravel abuse within Brighton NHS. As with many whistle-blowers Delilah attempted to raise these serious issues through the appropriate official channels but was blatantly ignored and punished for doing so. However, following the NHS exposure by Panorama, which involved brave Nurse Margaret Heywood, Delilah became the country’s very first Patient Safety Ombudsman and whistleblowing guardian as referred to by Sir Robert Francis QC in his recent Freedom to Speak-up Review.

The meeting with the Secretary of State for Health was not looking at the personal cases of the three campaigners. This is a meeting at which the campaigners represented the voices of all patients, families and NHS whistle-blowers. Solutions were discussed to address current issues that are still continuing to show failings and/or corrupt practices within all parts of the current NHS systems. They also raised with Mr Hunt the absence of accountability within the NHS. The three say they did not hold back their criticisms of the NHS as the days of covering up errors, fatalities and the vilifying of whistle-blowers must be brought to an end.

Click on the link below to read the minutes of the meeting with Jeremy Hunt

Private meeting with the Secretary of State for Health

Will Powell                                Delilah Hesling

Will Powell  Delilah

Jade Taylor

Jade

Filed under: Uncategorized

Junior doctors’ strike: BMA totally irresponsible – Jeremy Hunt

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has accused the British Medical Association (BMA) of being “totally irresponsible” over a lengthy industrial dispute.

The doctors’ union had refused to sit down and talk about improving patient care and had spread “misinformation”, he told the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show. Mr Hunt wants to change junior doctors’ contracts, which he says are “unfair”.

The BMA said its door was open to talks and blamed the strikes on Mr Hunt’s “shambolic mishandling” of the matter.

Click on the link to read and hear part of the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show in which Andrew Marr read out junior doctors’ concerns for Jeremy Hunt to respond to

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-35515732

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Junior doctors and their supporters staged a “masked march” protest in London

Filed under: Hospital, , ,

As the Zika virus is branded a global health emergency…are YOU at risk of the infection that can shrink babies’ brains?

  • The Zika virus, which shrinks babies’ heads, was first reported in Brazil just eight months ago
  • It has since spread to 23 other countries, including Mexico and Barbados
  • Predictions suggest 4 million people could be affected by the end of 2016

An incurable virus that shrinks babies’ brains sounds like the stuff of nightmares. And there is no denying the headlines about the zika virus have made alarming reading over the past week, with one expert from the World Health Organisation (WHO) describing its spread as ‘explosive’ — yesterday the organisation declared the virus a global health emergency.

Zika, which was identified in Africa in the Forties, was first reported in Brazil just eight months ago, but it has already now spread to 23 other countries in the region, including Mexico and Barbados, with predictions that the numbers affected could rise to four million by the end of the year.  Meanwhile, 31 Americans, four Canadians and three Britons have tested positive for zika — all were infected while travelling. However, a study published in The Lancet suggests around a third of the 9.9 million foreign tourists who visited risk areas in Brazil in a year, returned to Europe.

Here we look at why Zika has suddenly become a major health concern and what you need to know to protect yourself.

Click on the link to watch the video and read are you at risk? 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3427359/Are-risk-infection-shrink-babies-brains.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

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Filed under: Uncategorized, ,

‘I wouldn’t wish it on anyone’: Heartbroken daughter to sue hospital after dad given wrong cancer diagnosis

A heartbroken daughter is planning to sue hospital bosses after medics diagnosed her dad with terminal lung cancer – but then wrongly changed their minds.

Doctors left Roger Taylor in a discharge area of North Manchester General Hospital for 15 hours after ordering the wrong ambulance, the Manchester Evening News reports. He died less than 24 hours after arriving home.

Mr Taylor’s daughter Elizabeth is now suing Pennine Acute NHS Trust, claiming he died prematurely due to its actions. Mr Taylor, from Bury , fell ill last May just a few weeks after his wife Janet – who he had cared for – lost her own battle with cancer. At the start of June, the hospital told him he had very advanced lung cancer, which had spread. It was decided he would not have chemotherapy, as it would prolong his life by only a few months. Two weeks later, on June 25, the hospital rang to say it was not lung cancer after all, but lymphoma – a disease that could be treated. Mr Taylor’s family cancelled what was going to be his last holiday, at a cost of £1,000, and prepared for treatment at the Christie.

At that point, his family made a formal complaint. But just a week later the hospital changed its mind again – and said he did have incurable lung cancer after all. He was admitted to the hospital a fortnight later for a separate health issue, a visit he made alone in the belief it would only take a couple of hours. But when the decision was taken to discharge him, the nurse did not order him a palliative ambulance – so transport provider Arriva did not pick up the request until the following morning. After 15 hours waiting, he arrived home and died 21 hours later.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/i-wouldnt-wish-anyone-heartbroken-7284108?

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Diagnosis: Roger Taylor, seen here with his wife Janet

Filed under: Cancer, NHS Blunders, ,

10 symptoms of cancer you could be missing

A lump in the breast, sudden weight loss and blood in the stools. We think we know the signs of cancer. Except we don’t – and now experts are encouraging people to be more aware of less-known symptoms that could signal early disease and report them to their GPs. Research from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine shows England has some of the poorest survival rates in the Western world for common cancers such as colon, breast, lung, ovarian and stomach. In the UK, one in two people will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime and the disease is responsible for a quarter of all deaths. According to the National Institute of Clinical Excellence(Nice), about 5,000 lives a year could be saved by making earlier diagnoses.

But what are we looking for? “A lot of the early symptoms of cancer will be vague and non-specific,” says Peter Johnson, professor of medical oncology at Southampton University and lead clinician for Cancer Research UK. “It’s these that people need to be aware of and report to their doctors. But we’re not good at paying attention to our own bodies, to what’s normal for us, so we ignore minor symptoms which occasionally can be caused by early cancer.”

The good news is that most cancers are curable if caught in the early stages, says Dr David Bloomfield, clinical oncologist at the Sussex Cancer Centre, Royal Sussex County Hospital, and medical director for the Royal College of Radiologists. “Be aware of the red flags [see box below], but if something else is unexplained and unusual for you and doesn’t get better in a couple of weeks, get it checked out,” he says.

Together we have worked with Cancer Research UK and Britain’s leading oncologists to come up with a list of vague symptoms that shouldn’t be ignored.

Click on the ink to read the 10 symptoms

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/wellbeing/health-advice/10-symptoms-of-cancer-you-could-be-missing/?

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Artwork depicting cancer cells dividing

Filed under: Cancer, ,

Shocking video captures two care home workers taunting dementia sufferers by torturing the ‘comfort dolls’ they believe are real babies

  • Dementia patients at Ashbourne House care home are given therapy dolls
  • Some vulnerable residents come to see the toys as their own real children
  • Shocking video shows nurses taunting residents by torturing their dolls
  • Two members of staff have been suspended pending an investigation 

Carers have been suspended amid claims they taunted vulnerable dementia patients by torturing the ‘comfort dolls’ they believe are real babies in a series of sick pranks. Sickening video footage shot at Ashbourne House nursing home in Middleton, Greater Manchester, appears to show a member of staff throwing the doll to the floor, distressing its elderly owner. And photographs show the dolls being hanged, put in a tumble dryer and apparently being cooked in a saucepan on a hob.

Another photograph shows an elderly woman appearing distressed as her doll is snatched out of her hands, while there are also images of a doll face down in a fish tank.  A source claims that one picture, showing the doll hung with rope around the neck outside a resident’s bedroom window, was taken as the pensioner was sleeping after staff barged in and put the light on.

It is thought that the pictures and video were taken and shared among some members of staff via WhatsApp.  Two members of staff have been suspended pending an investigation.

Click on the link to read and see more of this evil

http://goo.gl/yuoNAc

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Filed under: Care Homes, , ,

Hunt apologises to family of dead boy over NHS sepsis failings

Health secretary accepts recommendations of report on William Mead, who died despite visits to GP and call to helpline

Jeremy Hunt has accepted the recommendations of a damning NHS report which found that doctors and the NHS helpline missed four opportunities to save the life of a one-year-old boy. The health secretary offered a public apology to the family of William Mead, who died in September 2014 of the common sepsis bug, which went undetected despite repeated visits to the GP and a call to the NHS 111 helpline hours before his death. He promised that lessons would be learned from Tuesday’s report. Labour accused the government of ignoring warnings about poor sepsis care a year before William died.

Speaking in the Commons, Hunt said: “Whilst any health system will inevitably suffer some tragedies, the issues raised in this case have significant implications for the rest of the NHS which I’m determined we should learn from.”

Hunt said he had met William’s mother, Melissa, to offer his personal apologies. “Quite simply, we let her, her family and William down in the worst possible way through serious failings in the NHS care offered and I would like to apologise to them on behalf of the government and the NHS.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/jan/26/hunt-apologises-to-family-of-boy-who-died-after-nhs-failed-to-diagnose-sepsis

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Filed under: NHS Blunders, , ,

Nothing can prepare you for seeing your baby in a coffin’: Bombshell report condemns NHS 111 service as not safe for sick children over blunders that cost baby his life

  • William Mead died after developing an abscess in his left lung aged one
  • His mother Melissa, 29, of Cornwall, called NHS out-of-hours service 
  • But non-medically trained call handler failed to realise how serious it was
  • NHS England report found service ‘unsafe for seriously ill children’

The out-of-hours NHS hotline is unsafe for seriously ill children, a bombshell report reveals. The 111 service puts parents at the mercy of a box-ticking process that can miss life-threatening symptoms. The shocking finding comes in a report into the death of a baby from sepsis. It said William Mead might be alive today had a 111 call handler realised just how ill he was.

That blunder is only one of 16 that contributed to the tragedy. But many of the problems are nationwide, the report says, because:

  • GPs are pressured not to prescribe antibiotics, including to children;
  • They are reluctant to refer sick patients to crowded casualty units;
  • Patients suffer ‘loss of continuity’ when taken ill over a weekend;
  • Out-of-hours doctors cannot access patients’ medical records, often leaving them in the dark.

The report is the result of a gruelling year-long campaign by Paul and Melissa Mead to know the truth about their son William’s death in December 2014. NHS England concluded that a doctor or a nurse taking their call would probably have seen the need for urgent action. But most 111 staff, who use computer scripts, are not medically trained. Other problems included the failure of GPs to carry out basic checks for signs of sepsis, and to give William the antibiotics that could have saved his life.

Mrs Mead said no words could explain her family’s profound loss. She called for lessons to be learnt from William’s death.

Click on the link to read more and watch the NHS Direct Video which shows how the 111 service works

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3416346/Bombshell-report-condemns-NHS-hours-service-not-safe-sick-children-blunders-cost-baby-life.html

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William Mead, pictured with parents Paul and Melissa, died from sepsis after a series of medical blunders including an NHS 111 service operator not realising how serious his illness was

Filed under: NHS Blunders, ,

GE Healthcare: US healthcare giant makes fortune from NHS but pays hardly a penny in tax

One of the biggest suppliers of equipment and testing services to the NHS pays barely any corporate tax in the UK, despite receiving hundreds of millions of pounds a year from medical sales to British clinics and hospitals.

A study of GE Healthcare’s accounts by The Independent suggests it has received more money back in tax benefits over the past 12 years than it has paid in, with the taxpayer appearing to be missing out on millions of pounds a year in lost revenues. The company has been headquartered in Buckinghamshire since 2003 when its vast US owner, General Electric, bought the British multinational medical firm Nycomed Amersham. It makes scanners and other equipment used in areas such as oncology and heart disease.

Nycomed Amersham typically used to pay up to £8m in corporation tax to the Exchequer every year, plus £50m to £90m more abroad. But in the 12 years since its takeover by GE, the UK divisions examined by The Independent made a total net gain of £1.6m in benefits from the taxman.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/cdUiNd

GE-Healthcare

Filed under: NHS, ,

MyNotes Medical

Just to let you all know that we are starting the build on the MyNotes Medical app Phase 1, I will keep you all updated, Joanna

1. welcome

Filed under: Uncategorized,

The secret A&E nurse’s diary: ‘He stands 1cm from my face, saying he will kill me’

A casualty nurse describes a week of stark contrasts, from helping a 79 year old man whose lips have turned blue to being confronted by a violent drunk

Sunday 7am – 7.30pm

Sundays are notoriously busy in A&E. GPs are closed, and there has been no movement out from the wards so there are no free beds in the hospital. At the start of my shift there are already 83 patients in the department. People are waiting to be treated in the corridors and it’s like sardines. My heart sinks. I’m in charge of ambulance triage – as soon as the ambulance pulls up outside, I have 15 minutes to get the patient into a cubicle and take over from the paramedic. I have targets to achieve. For every breach, we are fined. It seems unfair, especially when 10 turn up at once.

I hear one of my drunk patients shouting and run to find him ripping off his monitoring, throwing thousands of pounds worth of equipment across the room. I ask what he’s doing and he comes and stands 1cm away from my face, telling me he is going to kill me. He reaches into his pocket but before I know it, one of my colleagues has restrained him up against the wall.

Monday 7am – 7.30pm

Today is a day of stark contrast. I see a 20-year-old woman who describes symptoms of a urinary tract infection. Her GP prescribed her antibiotics five hours ago. She says they’re not working.

A few minutes later, a 79-year-old man walks into A&E. His lips are blue. He says he rolled over in bed last night and has felt short of breath since. I take him into resuscitation and later find out he suffered a collapsed lung. He should have phoned an ambulance.

Click on the link to read more of the secret A&E nurses diary

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/jan/22/casualty-nurse-diary-nhs

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Filed under: A&E, ,

Wolverhampton’s New Cross Hospital cancer scandal: Cleared after four-year fight! Victory for NHS whistle-blower

The whistle-blower who lifted the lid on the chemotherapy cancer scandal at the Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust has been cleared of misconduct after a four-year battle to clear his name, the Express & Star can reveal.

In October Professor David Ferry revealed that at least 55 patients were given extra chemotherapy treatment they did not need between 2005 and 2010. Following his revelations Professor Ferry – who has asked the Express & Star to name him in this article – had his integrity called into question by trust bosses. They issued a press release stating he was under investigation for ‘serious misconduct’, referenced his alleged ‘poor practice’ and accused him of ‘pursuing his own agenda’.

The General Medical Council (GMC) placed restrictions on Prof Ferry in March 2015 in light of concerns regarding his clinical practice and alleged resistance to ‘working effectively’ with colleagues at New Cross Hospital. Now the council’s Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service (MPTS) has removed the conditions and cleared him to return to practice should he wish to do so.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.expressandstar.com/news/2016/01/18/cleared-after-four-year-fight-victory-for-nhs-whistle-blower/

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Professor David Ferry, who has been cleared of misconduct after a four-year battle

Filed under: Whistleblowing, ,

Doctor ‘responsible for the avoidable death of teacher following caesarean’ nearly killed another new mother

Dr Nadeem Azeez is one of two anaesthetists accused of failing to take basic steps to save the life of Frances Cappuccini, 30

An underqualified foreign doctor alleged to have been responsible for the “totally unexpected and avoidable” death of a young teacher following an emergency caesarean had nearly killed another new mother placed in his care, a court heard.  Dr Nadeem Azeez is one of two anaesthetists accused of failing to take basic steps to save the life of Frances Cappuccini, 30, as they attempted to bring her round from a general anaesthetic following the birth of her second child.

Mrs Cappuccini never regained consciousness and died in October 2012 following a massive heart attack as a result of a build-up of acid in her body from lack of oxygen. A report into her death following an internal investigation was redacted to remove reference to the previous incident involving Dr Azeez before it was sent to the coroner, Inner London Crown Court heard.

In March 2012, Dr Azeez, 52, had been responsible for anaesthetising a woman at the same hospital who had suffered a haemorrhage after giving birth and whose placenta needed removing in theatre.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/sbYTKT

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Dr Nadeem Azeez (right) is accused of failing to take basic steps to save Frances Cappuccini

Filed under: NHS Blunders,

Nye Bevan’s dream: a history of the NHS

In 1946 the health minister strode into a Manchester hospital to launch a free healthcare service that has brought innovation and controversy ever since

Almost 68 years after its creation, the National Health Service’s founding principles remain intact: it continues to be funded from general taxation and free at the point of use. Here are some of the key moments in its history, with contemporary reports from the Guardian and Observer archive.

1948

The NHS was born was 5th July 1948. On that day, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, opticians, dentists and hospitals came together for the first time as one giant UK-wide organisation. It was inaugurated when Aneurin “Nye” Bevan, the health minister who was its far-sighted creator, visited Park hospital in Davyhulme, Manchester. It is now Trafford general hospital and is known as “the birthplace of the NHS” as the first NHS hospital.

On that day Bevan met the NHS’s first patient, 13-year-old Sylvia Diggory, who had acute nephritis, a life-threatening liver condition. Later, Diggory recalled: “Mr Bevan asked me if I understood the significance of the occasion and told me that it was a milestone in history – the most civilised step any country had ever taken. I had earwigged at adults’ conversations and I knew this was a great change that was coming about and that most people could hardly believe this was happening.” It had huge public support, though the British Medical Association, the doctors’ union, was still threatening to boycott it until as late as February 1948.

Click on the link to read more of the history of the NHS from 1948 – 2014

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/jan/18/nye-bevan-history-of-nhs-national-health-service

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1964

Filed under: NHS,

NHS fails on key performance targets

The NHS has yet again failed to hit some of its key performance targets, raising fears that problems are now deeply ingrained and that services are at risk of buckling under the pressure, particularly if colder whether sparks a spike in the number of patients needing medical attention.

Data for November show that, for the sixth month in a row, the standard for the number of the most urgent ambulance calls’ being responded to within eight minutes was missed, coming in at 71.9 percent versus the target of 75 percent. The number of less urgent ‘Red 2’ calls hitting the eight-minute response target was even lower, at just 67.4 percent.

According to the figures, there were 1,874,234 attendances at A&E in November 2015, up 2.4 percent from the same month in 2014. But the number of patients admitted, transferred and discharged from A&E within the four-hour target continued to slip, with 91.3 percent for the period versus the 95 percent target and 93.5 percent a year ago.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.pharmatimes.com/Article/16-01-15/NHS_fails_on_key_performance_targets.aspx

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Filed under: NHS, ,

NHS moves to stop bereaved families blocking donation of relatives’ organs

If someone wishes to become an organ donor then their family should respect their wishes. Totally disrespectful of their dying wishes and totally selfish in not wanting to help save the life of another. It’s the kindest thing anyone can do. Joanna

Families have vetoed the donation of organs from hundreds of registered donors in the last five years, new figures show

NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) data suggests relatives blocked transplants in 547 – or one in seven – cases since 2010.  The body said it would no longer seek a family’s formal consent in order to reduce the number of “overrides”, according to the BBC. The bereaved will be given a leaflet which explains consent remains with the deceased, although they can still block donation by providing reasons in writing.

NHSBT estimated the blocked donors would have provided organs for 1,200 of the 6,578 patients on the waiting list for a transplant, while not asking relatives could result in the number donors rising by 9%.

Sally Johnson, director of organ donation and transplantation at NHSBT, told the broadcaster: “We are taking a tougher approach – but also a more honest approach.

“My nurses are speaking for the person who has died. People who join the register want and expect to become organ donors. We do not want to let them down. “We have every sympathy for families – and of course we do not want to make their grief worse. We think this will make what is a hugely distressing day easier for them, by reducing the burden on them. “The principle that the individual affected is the one who consents applies throughout medicine, and it is not different because someone has died.”

The Guardian – Press Association http://goo.gl/o12HXQ

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Filed under: Uncategorized,

The dementia timebomb: People fear it MORE than cancer – yet it receives only a tenth of the funding

  • Dame Gill Morgan is chair of NHS Providers, representing hospital trusts  
  • Says dementia research lags 25 years behind the progress made in cancer
  • Advances in drug development will be too late for 850,000 sufferers

Dementia research is lagging 25 years behind the progress made in cancer, a leading health chief warned today.  People fear Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia more than cancer – yet dementia research receives only a tenth of the funding. Dame Gill Morgan, chair of NHS Providers, said yesterday: ‘Dementia is, in my view, the cruellest disease.

‘It is a cruel disease because your family watch you declining, and they lose the person, but they keep the body. ‘Studies show that dementia is now the most feared disease, it is more feared than cancer. ‘It is the thing that people do not want to get when they are older. ‘One of the thing that makes it very difficult, is that we really are not fully clear what the biological causes are. ‘If you compare it to cancer, and the knowledge that we have about the biology and genetics of the disease, cancer is probably 20 to 25 years ahead.’

Dame Gill, whose organisation represents most English NHS trusts, said that advances currently being made in dementia drug development will come too late to help the 850,000 people currently living with the disease in Britain.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/BBzS6V

© Copyright 2010 CorbisCorporation

Pictured, CT scan of sufferers’ brains

 

Filed under: Dementia, ,

Junior doctors row: David Cameron asks doctors to call off strike

David Cameron has urged junior doctors to call off their planned strike.

He warned Tuesday’s strike will cause “real difficulties for patients and potentially worse”. The strike begins across England at 08:00 GMT, from when junior doctors will only provide emergency care.

Talks between the doctors’ union – the BMA – and NHS bosses continue. The BMA has said the strikes “demonstrated the strength of feeling amongst the profession”. Issues being disputed by the BMA and NHS include weekend pay and whether there are appropriate safeguards in place to stop hospitals over-working doctors.

Three strikes are set to take place from:

  • 08:00 Tuesday 12 January to 08:00 Wednesday 13 January (emergency care will be staffed)
  • 08:00 Tuesday 26 January to 08:00 Thursday 28 January (emergency care will be staffed)
  • 08:00 to 17:00 Wednesday 10 February (full walk-out)

Click on the link to read more

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-35280399

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Filed under: Hospital, ,

Our baby choked to death in nurse’s care so why didn’t they admit it for 14 years? Mother was branded ‘mental’ for pursuing the truth after 11-month-old daughter died

  • Anne Dixon, 52, branded ‘mental’ in police notes during her 14-year battle for the truth behind death of her disabled 11-month-old daughter Elizabeth
  • An agency nurse, Joyce Aburime, with no experience had been looking after Elizabeth and failed to notice a blockage in her tracheostomy tube
  • Anne referred for psychiatric treatment over ‘unreasonable concerns’
  • Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt recently ordered an investigation into case

Anne Dixon sat in the back seat of an unfamiliar car, watching as her husband cradled the lifeless body of her 11-month-old daughter. Overcome with grief and shock, she gazed at Elizabeth’s tiny face, her still frame wrapped in her pink flannelette sheet. In what appeared to be a simple act of compassion, albeit a highly unusual one, Dr Michael Tettenborn – the doctor in charge of Elizabeth’s care – was driving the grieving mother, her husband and their dead baby home.  Also in the car was the nurse, Joyce Aburime, who they held responsible for their daughter’s tragic death. It was only later, after the shock of their loss had subsided, that Anne and Graeme Dixon realised how bizarrely inappropriate this journey home had been.

Earlier that morning, profoundly disabled Elizabeth was rushed to the A&E department at Frimley Park Hospital in Surrey after the tracheostomy tube that helped her breathe had become fatally blocked and Elizabeth was suffocating.  As would later emerge, an agency nurse with no experience had been looking after Elizabeth but failed to notice the blockage in the tube. To Anne and Graeme’s utter devastation, their daughter was pronounced dead.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3392107/Mother-branded-mental-pursuing-truth-11-month-old-daughter-died-E.html

Collect Photos showing Elizabeth Dixon being held by her Mother  Pix Info : about 4 months old in Great Ormond Street Hospital  Copyright  Photo Dixon Family MAIL ON SUNDAY ONLY  Sent by Les@leswilson.com 14th Oct 2015

Anne Dixon holding Elizabeth when she was about four months old in Great Ormond Street Hospital. Elizabeth was pronounced dead after a nurse with no experience failed to notice the blockage in her tracheostomy tube that helped her breathe. Anne battled health authorities for 14-years and it was only recently that an investigation was ordered by Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt

 

 

Filed under: NHS Blunders, ,

David Cameron ‘must take bold action to tackle NHS and social care pressures’

Leading charities have called on David Cameron to take “bold” action to tackle the growing pressures on health and social care, warning that vulnerable elderly and disabled people will “bear the brunt” if he fails.

A letter backed by nearly 40 organisations, including older people’s charity Independent Age, Macmillan Cancer Support and Marie Curie, urges the Prime Minister to set up an independent commission to review the system. It warns there is ” no room for complacency” and points to official figures that suggest nearly a quarter of the population will be over the age of 65 in just over 20 years’ time.

The letter states: “We need to ensure we have an NHS and social care system that is fit for purpose otherwise it is the elderly, disabled people and their carers who will bear the brunt of inaction. ” Bold long term thinking is required about the size, shape and scope of services we want the NHS and social care to provide – and an honest debate about how much as a society we are prepared to pay for them. “It is vital that you meet the challenge posed by an ageing society, and an underfunded care system, head on and establish a cross-party commission to review the future of health and social care in England.”

It comes after former health minister Norman Lamb warned some experts believe there will be a £30 billion “gap” in NHS funding by 2020 despite the Government already committing extra cash.

 

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/pa/article-3391237/David-Cameron-bold-action-tackle-NHS-social-care-pressures.html

Prime Minister David Cameron has been warned about the pressures facing the NHS

Prime Minister David Cameron has been warned about the pressures facing the NHS

Filed under: Disabilities, Elderly, , ,

8 years ago today my darling mother passed away

8 years ago today on the 8th January 2008 my darling mother passed away after being in hospital for 6 months for a routine hip operation. She will now be dancing in heaven with my dear dad. Love you mum, always and forever xxxxx

You can read my mother’s story which was published in The Mail on Sunday on 5th June 2011

Click on the link to read

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1394300/NHS-hip-operation-mother-died-Daughters-harrowing-account.html

mum - Copy

Filed under: Hospital, ,

Former head of leadership at NHS England jailed – By Lawrence Dunhill for HSJ

A former head of leadership at NHS England has been jailed for nearly five years after being convicted of fraud offences.

  • Neil Wood was part of a group  convicted of unlawfully taking £3.5m from NHS England and two trusts
  • Case revolved around payments made for training videos featuring his wife
  • Wood was a senior manager at LYPFT until March 2013, and also worked with Leeds Community Healthcare before moving to NHS England
  • He was arrested in June 2014, after police were alerted by HMRC

Neil Wood, 41, was part of a group of people convicted of unlawfully taking £3.5m from NHS England, Leeds and York Partnership Foundation Trust and Leeds Community Healthcare Trust over a number of years. The case, which concluded at Leeds Crown Court on Friday, revolved around payments made for training videos featuring his wife.

NHS Protect, which supported the case against Wood, said he had awarded numerous training contracts to a company called The Learning Grove, which was run by his friend. Over a seven year period to June 2014,  £1.8m was transferred from The Learning Grove to LW Learning, a company registered in his wife’s name.

Click on the link to read more

A former head of leadership at NHS England has been jailed

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Filed under: NHS,

NHS whistleblower helpline ‘useless’ campaigner Rab Wilson claims

A CONFIDENTIAL phone line set up to allow NHS workers to report concerns about patient safety and bullying has been branded “useless” by one of the country’s most high-profile whistleblowers.

Rab Wilson, a nurse who uncovered a catalogue of failings at NHS Ayrshire and Arran, said he had suggested the measure to Nicola Sturgeon but the initiative had “failed utterly” as it had proved toothless in holding health boards to account. The Scottish Government hit back at the claims, saying its policies allowing health workers to raise concerns were already “robust” and would be strengthened further with the appointment of an independent national whistleblowing officer.

Mr Wilson spoke out after Dr Jane Hamilton, a consultant psychiatrist, revealed that she was retiring after believing that she had become known as a “troublemaker” within the Scottish NHS. She warned bosses that lives were being put at risk at a specialist Mother and Baby Unit at St John’s Hospital in Livingston before going public with her fears. Dr Hamilton said that she had been unable to find work north of the Border and that a weekly commute to Yorkshire where she worked for the NHS in England had proved too demanding.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/homenews/14170660.NHS_whistleblower_helpline__useless___campaigner_claims/

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Rab Wilson, outside the Scottish Parliament

Filed under: Whistleblowing, , , ,

Some hospital trusts make millions a year from car parks

Some hospital trusts in England are making more than £3m a year from car parking fees, Freedom of Information (FOI) requests have shown.

Of more than 90 trusts that responded to FOI requests, half are making at least £1m a year, the news agency Press Association (PA) found. The Patients Association said the charges were “morally wrong”. But many trusts defended their revenues, saying some or all of the money was put back into patient care.

The investigation showed hospitals were making increasing amounts of money from staff, patients and visitors – including those who are disabled – who used their car parks. It also found hospitals were giving millions of pounds to private firms to run their car parks for them, with some receiving money from parking fines. Others are tied into private finance initiative contracts, where all the money charged from car parks goes to companies under the terms of the scheme.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-35157425

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Filed under: Hospital,

NHS paid more than £1m in compensation due to helpline’s bad advice

THE HEALTH service has had to pay out more than £1million in compensation to patients who suffered after being given poor advice from the controversial NHS Direct telephone helpline.

Legal documents from the NHS show that patients who rang the now-disbanded service have successfully sued for a range of ailments triggered by incorrect advice. One case involved the family of a patient who died. In another the patient suffered life-changing brain damage as a result of not getting treatment quickly enough. Other payouts involved patients left blind, in needless pain, requiring extra operations and a case where a man had to have a testicle removed.

In nearly all the cases NHS Direct accepted there was a delay or a ­failure to recognise the symptoms of an ­illness or to refer somebody to hospital quickly enough. The dossier of claims also lists cases where patients won compensation after suffering a heart attack, dental damage, burns and peritonitis, a serious abdominal infection. Over the past four years the NHS has paid out on 13 cases where it has accepted that a patient suffered because of negligent advice.

The total compensation involved is £1.4million. The figure has shot up in the past year as one of the most recent cases, believed to be where the victim suffered brain damage, was settled with a payment of more than £1million.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/8oq0fz

NHS-Direct-phone-helpline-debacle-629557

Filed under: NHS Blunders, ,

NHS ‘Must Keep Pace’ With Allergy Epidemic

One of the world’s top allergy experts says many health professionals are inadequately trained to deal with the crisis.

Nathalie Dyson-Coope’s four-year-old son, Callum, has 12 severe food allergies – six of them are potentially fatal. His sensitivities to foods, including peanuts, milk, eggs and tomatoes, began when he was a baby with reactions varying from painful rashes to life-threatening anaphylaxis.

Ms Dyson-Coope said she had trouble getting some GPs to understand Callum’s reactions, which often involved excruciating, bleeding eczema. “You would pick him up in the morning… and it would look like a murder had been committed in his moses basket. It was absolutely horrific. “It didn’t matter how many times we went to the doctors, they would say ‘oh it’s just baby eczema’ or ‘it’s just colic’ or ‘it’s just a bit of reflux – they’ll get over it’.”

A sharp increase in allergy sufferers over the past 20 years has made allergic disease the most common chronic disorder in childhood, matched only the obesity crisis. Some 50% of children now have an allergy, with some reactions potentially fatal, but scientists still do not know why. One of the world’s top allergy experts told Sky News cases are not being identified early enough because many health care professionals are inadequately trained to deal with the growing epidemic.

Click on the link to read more and watch video’s

http://news.sky.com/story/1612769/nhs-must-keep-pace-with-allergy-epidemic

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4 year old Callum

Filed under: Uncategorized,

Junior Doctors – emotional video about NHS Staff working at Christmas

Mini-documentary. An emotional collection of personal stories from Junior Doctors from around England, from their own Christmas shifts.

When we left medical school, we had to take an oath to “do no harm”. The new proposed contract being imposed will cause harm to our patients, as it is unsafe. We cannot let this happen – we have one the first battle in recommencing proper negotiations. But we have been given

Filed under: Hospital, ,

Whistle blower retires with her career in Scotland ruined

A whistle-blowing doctor who was at the centre of a gagging row, has retired after deciding her career in Scotland is beyond repair.

Dr Jane Hamilton now advises any doctor thinking of blowing the whistle in Scotland to think very hard before doing so as it has ruined her professional life. The consultant perinatal psychiatrist has been working in Hull where her specialist expertise has been warmly welcomed. But her family is settled north of the border and she has finally found the weekly commute too demanding.

However she believes she is now seen as a trouble-maker within the NHS in Scotland. Jobs she has applied for have been re-advertised shortly afterwards. “It would appear they would rather have nobody than have me,” she said.

She and her family had moved north in 2007 because Dr Hamilton had been appointed to the Mother and Baby Unit (MBU) at St John’s Hospital in Livingston. Her national reputation in the care of mothers with severe psychiatric problems had been recognised when she was asked to help draw up the UK guidelines before her appointment in Scotland.

By the end of 2007 she raised concerns over how the unit was being run and shortly afterwards warned in writing that patients could die. Two women patients subsequently took their own lives and the family of one is now suing the health board for medical negligence.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/homenews/14168041.Whistle_blower_retires_with_her_career_in_Scotland_ruined/

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Dr Jane Hamilton, a consultant psychiatrist pictured in Glasgow.

Filed under: Whistleblowing, ,

Elderly and social care in the NHS: share your experiences

Whether you live alone or in a care home the Guardian would like to hear about your experiences of the NHS care and support services you’ve received

With news that a training scheme to address the shortage of nurses in care homes has been scrapped the social care sector, and the services that provide for the elderly in particular, is facing a crisis that could affect those in need.

Whether you live at home alone and are provided with practical support, live in sheltered accommodation or a residential or nursing home we’d like to hear from you.

We’d also like to hear how you combat loneliness. Perhaps you have someone to help with your shopping or someone who visits you to keep you company. Whatever kind of social care you receive from the NHS, share your stories with us.

Do you care for older parents or relatives? If so we’d like to hear from you too. Do they live with you in a home adapted to their needs? If they’re in a care home what is it like for both you and your relative? If you’re a carer for a relative and you have applied for respite care what was your experience like? Do you feel supported by the NHS? Share your experiences with us and we’ll feature some of your stories on the site.

Click on the link to fill out the form

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/dec/19/elderly-and-social-care-in-the-nhs-share-your-experiences

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Filed under: Care Homes, Elderly,

Revealed: NHS hospitals investigate one in seven deaths of vulnerable patients

Jeremy Hunt urged to investigate after trusts examine just 209 of 1,436 deaths of inpatients with learning disabilities

Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary, is facing calls for a nationwide inquiry into the deaths of highly vulnerable patients in NHS care after it emerged that just one in seven such fatalities in hospitals in England have been investigated.

Data released to the Guardian under freedom of information laws show that hospitals in England have investigated just 209 out of 1,436 deaths of inpatients with learning disabilities since 2011. Even among deaths they classed as unexpected, hospitals inquired into only a third. Just 100 (36.2%) of the 276 deaths in that category were the subject of an investigation, despite longstanding concerns that these patients receive poorer care and are at higher risk of dying while in hospital.

“The findings from this investigation are very concerning,” said Prof Mike Richards, England’s chief inspector of hospitals. “We’re keen to work with the Guardian to look at the new information in more detail. This will help us to plan the review that CQC [Care Quality Commission] is already committed to doing.”

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/dec/20/revealed-nhs-hospitals-investigate-1-in-7-deaths-of-vulnerable-patients

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Filed under: Disabilities, ,

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