STRENGTH IN NUMBERS

Strength in Numbers dedicated to my late mother Kay

GP statistics available to public through new data hub

The public can now access a wide range of statistical information on GP practices from across England, with the launch of a new data hub.

NHS Digital’s GP Data Hub, which launched in April, aims to bring together data from GP practises in an easily accessible format.

Over the next six months NHS Digital will add more figures from a variety of health areas onto the unique hub.

“Currently it has Qualities Outcomes Framework (QOF) data, patient list size, as well as indicators about people with learning disabilities,” an NHS Digital spokesman said.

Click on the link to read

https://www.digitalhealth.net/2017/05/gp-statistics-available-public-new-data-hub/

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Filed under: GP's, NHS, Uncategorized,

Government has tried to ‘scapegoat’ GPs for NHS crisis, say angry GP leaders

GP leaders have slammed attempts to ‘scapegoat’ GPs for the NHS crisis, after widespread reports that Downing Street sources had blamed GPs for making patients suffer by failing to provide enough access to appointments.

GPC chair Dr Chaand Nagpaul said the cause of the crisis engulfing parts of the health service was underfunding, and warned this was ‘not the time to deflect blame or scapegoat overstretched GP services’.

Conservative MP and former GP Dr Sarah Wollaston called comments attributed to Downing Street ‘beyond belief’.

Reports over the weekend suggested that some practice funding could in future be linked to the requirement to open from 8am to 8pm, seven days a week unless they can prove there is no local demand.

Click on the link to read more

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GPC chair Dr Chaand Nagpaul

Filed under: GP's, Uncategorized,

Questions over efficiency of NHS referral management centres

NHS bodies are paying millions of pounds to private firms that stop patients being referred to hospital by their GP, an investigation has found.

NHS bodies are paying millions of pounds to private firms that stop patients being referred to hospital by their GP, an investigation has found. Controversial referral management centres are used by some clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) to scrutinise patient referrals to hospitals by family doctors.

 Supporters say they can cut down on inappropriate referrals, saving the NHS money, but critics argue that adding an extra layer of scrutiny can risk delaying diagnosis for the patient. There is also a question mark over how effective such schemes are.

In a new investigation, the British Medical Journal (BMJ) sent freedom of information requests to all 211 CCGs in England. Of 184 that responded, 72 (39%) said they currently commissioned some form of referral management scheme to help manage outpatient demand at their local hospitals.

Almost a third (32%) of the schemes are provided by private companies, while a further 29% are provided in house and 11% by local NHS trusts. Some 69% of CCGs with schemes gave details of operating costs. These CCGs combined have spent at least £57m on schemes since April 2013.

Most CCGs were unable to provide evidence showing the scheme saved money. Only 14% could show that the scheme had saved more cash than it had cost to operate, while 12% showed that their schemes had not saved money overall.

Meanwhile, 74% of CCGs (53 groups) failed to supply figures to show whether any money had been saved, the BMJ reported.

Click on the link to read more

https://goo.gl/7ZhZaC

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Filed under: GP's, NHS, Uncategorized, ,

Exclusive: GP practices serving more than 5m patients could close in the next year

More than 5m patients in England could be forced to look for a new GP over the next year as surgery closures hit record levels, a poll suggests.

One in 10 GPs believe their practice is at risk of closure in the next 12 months because of underfunding, workload or recruitment problems, according to a GPonline opinion poll of 298 GPs.

Many more GPs are aware of struggling practices in their local area – 41% of respondents said they knew a neighbouring practice that was at risk of closure in the next year. GP leaders warned that NHS England must do more to deliver rapid bailout funding to prevent the collapse of practices across the country.

The closure of one in 10 of the 7,500-plus GP practices in England – which have an average list size of around 7,000 – could leave 5.25m patients looking for a new family doctor.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/YKnnGR

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Filed under: GP's, ,

Drug shortages are ‘harming’ patients, say GPs

Patients are coming to harm due to drug shortages, GPs have warned, as a GPonline survey revealed four out of five GPs were pushed to prescribe second-choice medicines in the last year due to shortages.

In the GPonline survey of 441 GPs, 82% said drug shortages had forced them to prescribe a second-choice drug in the past 12 months. Just 12% said they had not, while 6% indicated they did not know. One in five (18%) of the GPs who had prescribed a second-choice drug said that patients had gone on to experience negative effects as a result, including harm or slower recovery. Another 43% said they were not aware of any adverse effects, and 39% said they did not know.

Many GP respondents expressed their frustration at the situation, which several reported had happened on a number of occasions. One said a patient had suffered because the medicine they needed was not manufactured for a time. Another said that, while no patients had experienced major effects, ‘some have complained of increased side effects’.

Click on the link to read more

http://goo.gl/XyRHup

Medicine pill capsules with medicine bottle on light background. Shallow Depth Of Field.

Filed under: GP's, ,

NHS to withhold report on primary care support problems until 2017

NHS England will wait more than a year before it publishes its report of serious and significant events recorded for primary care support services since Capita took over.

Pulse has learned that NHS England intends to publish an annual round-up of the problems raised by practices, but the first publication – due July 2016 – will only cover issues reported by 31 March this year.

This will not include the details around the piles of uncollected patient notes and dwindling stocks of essential clinical supplies, which have happened since the new national system went live at the start of April. LMC leaders are also reporting that GPs have ‘given up’ on flagging concerns because they are fatigued with the number of problems they have to document.

GP leaders have labelled NHS England’s decision a ‘bloody disgrace’, adding that Capita is operating under different standards to practices that are required to regularly audit and learn from significant events.

Click on the link to read the full article

http://goo.gl/w2inl4

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Filed under: GP's, , ,

My Story With Addisons Disease – Justice for Robbie Powell! article by Malisha Fuller

Let’s see how many shares we can get for justice for this family and awareness.

Because of negligence by medical professionals, Robert Darren Powell [Robbie] died on April 17, 1990 at the young age of 10. Four months before his death, he suffered from all the classical symptoms of Addison’s disease or Adrenal Insufficiency. Robbie had suffered from an Addisonian crisis and almost died in December 1989 when he was admitted to hospital as a medical emergency.

The medical professionals suspected Addison’s disease and ordered the ACTH test but did not share this information with his parents who would have ensured the test was carried out. Instead, the physicians blamed Robbie’s symptoms on gastroenteritis, which was untenable in the absence of diarrhoea, the high potassium, low sodium and low blood sugar.

Robbie was seen by 5 different doctors, on 7 separate occasions, in the last 15 days of his life. He was seen by 3 doctors, 4 times, in his last 3 days. Although the young boy was obviously unwell not one physician performed blood tests or even checked his blood pressure during this period. The medical physicians failed Robbie by not referring the child to a specialist, as requested in the medical notes. They also failed to admit him to the hospital to evaluate his condition thoroughly until it was too late to save his life. An Addison’s patient does not produce sufficient amounts of the hormone cortisol so therefore needs daily steroids to maintain life. Infection, stress, injury and surgery for Addison’s sufferers require additional steroids.

Click on the link to read the whole story

My Story With Addisons Disease

Robbie Powell

 

Filed under: GP's, NHS Blunders, ,

9000 Gloucestershire patients caught in NHS no man’s land

Around 9000 people in Gloucestershire who are registered with Welsh GPs are still are still being treated unlawfully – according to a campaign group. It’s a claim disputed by NHS Wales.

Action4OurCare has been fighting for the rights of residents for three years, so they can gain access to treatment they are entitled to at English hospitals. One of the people caught up in this NHS no-mans land in Guy Rastell – like thousands of others he lives in England, but has no choice but to register with a Welsh GP: Now he’s received a letter from his consultant at Southmead Hospital saying that despite wanting to treat still him she could no longer do so, because “the Welsh NHS are not (and have not previously) funded any of his clinical visits”.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.itv.com/news/west/2016-04-13/gloucester-patients-caught-in-nhs-no-mans-land/

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I find that astonishing. I’ve always lived in England since 1947. I find it very strange that after 33 years of continuous attendance, somehow funding comes into it to stop my continuing care.  GUY RASTELL

 

Filed under: GP's,

Nine in 10 GPs fear missing symptoms due to workload – survey

One in 10 say they feel so overworked and disillusioned that they will quit in the next year, and 97% say morale has worsened

Nine out of 10 GP’s fear they will miss a vital clue about a patient’s illness during a consultation because they are so busy, a poll of family doctors reveals. And one in 10 say they feel so overworked and disillusioned with the rising demand for care, endless paperwork and the push for seven-day GP services that they will quit in the next year.

The findings, contained in a poll of 504 GPs from across the UK undertaken last month by ComRes on behalf of the Royal College of GPs (RCGP), underline the growing doubts about the government’s pledge to increase the number of family doctors in England by 5,000 by 2020. The survey found that 88% of respondents worried about missing something serious during an appointment with a patient because of their workload.

“It is OK now and again to have a really busy day, but at the moment in general practice it’s relentless, and that is a threat to our own health and our patients’ safety,” said Dr Maureen Baker, the chair of the RCGP. “Tired GPs are more likely to make mistakes, be it missing a potential symptom or making a paperwork error, and the results of our survey today show that this is a very real concern for a huge number of family doctors. “Demand on general practice is increasing and the resources and workforce available to us are so lacking that individual GPs are currently seeing too many patients a day to be safe. And then at the end of a long day in clinic, we will still have a mountain of paperwork to get through.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/nov/23/nine-in-10-gps-fear-missing-symptoms-workload-survey

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Filed under: GP's, , ,

Around 500 GPs are needed to help save a struggling NHS in East Yorkshire and northern Lincolnshire, according to a new report.

There is a warning that a GP crisis – which means ever-increasing waiting times in East Yorkshire and northern Lincolnshire – is deepening.

New figures have revealed 500 GPs are needed, with the NHS seemingly struggling to fill the void. Now it is having to turn overseas to help fill it. Fiona Dwyer reports:

Click on the link to watch the video report

http://www.itv.com/news/calendar/story/2015-10-22/regions-gp-crisis/

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Filed under: GP's, , ,

Why GPs are quitting in droves: They get six-figure salaries and don’t have to work weekends or nights. Yet so many GPs are giving up it’s never been harder to see one. This major series examines the (very) disturbing reasons why

  • Figures reveal 10.2 per cent of full-time GP positions across UK are vacant
  • Only 61 per cent of vacancies can even be temporarily filled by locum staff
  • Ever-growing numbers of GPs are also choosing to take early retirement
  • In total 5,114 GPs have retired in England alone in the past three years 

There is a picture-postcard quality to Frinton-on-Sea, with its golden sands, Victorian-style beach huts and famous esplanade, where crowds of day-trippers spend the summer months laying out picnic blankets and licking ice creams. The genteel Essex town (population 5,500) has a station, six schools, seven churches, 27 restaurants and cafes and, to the delight of many residents of its comfortable retirement chalets, the UK’s 11th best golf club. Yet something has recently been missing — something very important. Because for most of the past year, Frinton has not had a single full-time GP.

There are more than 8,000 men, women and children registered at the Caradoc Surgery, the only NHS facility in town. Yet when the Daily Mail visited last month, there were no qualified doctors on its staff. That is because the last permanent family doctor still practising in Frinton took early retirement last year. Patients were left in the hands of a rolling cast of locums — or temporary GPs — shipped in to work on a shift basis. They therefore found it almost impossible to see the same doctor more than once.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3258318/Why-GPs-quitting-droves-six-figure-salaries-don-t-work-weekends-nights-GPs-giving-s-never-harder-one-major-series-examines-disturbing-reasons-why.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

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Filed under: GP's, , ,

Hospital patients far more likely to die if sent home at weekend – Alarming’ findings

‘Alarming’ findings from the first major study to examine differences in hospital discharge times shows patients are far more likely to die after being sent home at weekends

Hospital patients are up to a third more likely to die if they are sent home from hospital at weekends, the first major research into discharge times has revealed. The 13 year study of one million hospital patients shows far higher mortality rates among those who are discharged on Saturdays and Sundays – especially for the elderly.

Experts said patients are being put at risk from a lack of senior doctors involved in discharge decisions, gaps in key hospital services, and the failure of GP, community and social care services to look after patients sent home at weekends. Charities said the findings were “alarming” and showed an urgent need to increase levels of care at weekends. The research comes as doctors unions agreed on Thursday night to reopen negotiations on the contract for consultants, in order to increase levels of weekend cover, or see them imposed.

The British Medical Association (BMA) had been given a deadline of the end of Friday to agree changes to future consultants’ contracts, to lose the right to opt out of non-emergency work or see a new deal forced upon them by the Government.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/11856761/Hospital-patients-far-more-likely-to-die-if-sent-home-at-weekend.html

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Filed under: Elderly, GP's, Hospital, NHS, , ,

Can involving pharmacists in A&E shorten waiting times and help doctors?

Accident and emergency departments are nearing crisis point, but evidence suggests that some of the pressure comes from patients who want to avoid having to wait for a GP appointment. Could pharmacists reduce the burden by helping to treat A&E patients suffering relatively minor conditions?

This is the question that Health Education England (HEE) hopes to answer through a national project. The aim, says Matt Aiello, special projects manager, transformation, at Health Education West Midlands, is to find out whether pharmacists can be a “relevant and viable part” of the A&E team and, if so, what kind of training they would need. A pilot in the West Midlands, looking at 782 patients attending A&E in three acute trusts between April 2013 and August 2014, was encouraging.

It found that 39.8% of patients could have been dealt with by a pharmacist with advanced clinical practice training skills, while an independent prescribing pharmacist could have dealt with another 5.1%.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/healthcare-network/2015/sep/09/pharmacists-shorten-waiting-times-help-doctors?

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Filed under: A&E, GP's, , ,

They Made Me Feel Like a Paranoid Parent – But My Son Had Cancer

September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month

In September 2013 my two-year-old son Luke complained that it hurt when he peed. I took him to our GP and they said it was probably thrush or an infection and he was given antibiotics. After he peed out a lump I went back, but there wasn’t enough to test, and the GP didn’t think it was serious enough to refer him on at that point.

The pain went away, but it came back a month later, and our GP referred him to a consultant. But the appointment was four whole weeks away, which seemed like an eternity, and things got worse. It got to the point to where he couldn’t empty his bladder, and was straining until he was red in the face, veins popping out of his neck and screaming in agony on and off all day and all night. Me and my partner Tim were at our wits end and ended up going to A&E a number of times to try and get help for Luke sooner.

 But at A&E the doctors we saw seemed really dismissive and acted like we were wasting their time. They thought it was constipation and they questioned his diet. Then they said it was a urine infection, and gave us more antibiotics. I didn’t feel listened to.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/jess-lusher/they-made-me-feel-paranoid-but-son-had-cancer_b_8064250.html?

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Filed under: A&E, Cancer, GP's, NHS

Every hospital patient will be given a barcode as part of plan to create a ‘paper free’ NHS

Every patient in hospital will be given an individual barcode to ensure they are given the correct drugs and treatment, as part of plans to make the NHS “paper free” by the end of the decade.

Under proposals to be outlined on Tuesday, patients will also be able to book appointments, order repeat prescriptions and access their GP records using NHS smartphone apps.

The Government is also going to examine the feasibility of installing free wi-fi in every hospital and GP surgery in England. By 2020, NHS England says, it will have digitalised every patient and care record in the country – meaning that whenever patients come into contact with the health service, medics will have all of their clinical notes and test results available immediately. The changes will not apply in Scotland and Wales, but similar plans are being developed in the devolved regions.

In addition, patients, pieces of medical equipment and drugs will be identified using barcodes for the first time. This, it is claimed, will help to ensure that the right patient will be given the right drug, at the right dose and at the right time.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/every-hospital-patient-will-be-given-a-barcode-as-part-of-plan-to-create-a-paper-free-nhs-10480338.html

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Filed under: A&E, GP's, Hospital, NHS

Thousands of new doctors opt for a better life abroad

Disillusioned medics are quitting the NHS and heading for countries such as Australia

Doctors who are newly qualified form a growing proportion of the thousands of British medics seeking jobs abroad each year, triggering concerns that the NHS is heading for a staffing crisis.

Specialist recruitment agencies and GPs’ leaders say doctors, many of whom have just finished their training, are becoming disillusioned with the state of their profession and seeking fresh starts in countries such as Australia, where they can earn double what they are paid in Britain. Figures given to the Observer by the General Medical Council show that an average of 2,852 certificates enabling British doctors to work abroad were issued annually between 2008 and 2014 – a total of 19,522.

So far this year the council has issued a further 2,008 certificates of good standing, the document that enables doctors to register with an overseas regulatory body or employer, taking the total who have applied to work overseas in the last eight years to almost 22,000. “Medicine is a global profession and the UK has long relied on doctors coming to work in the UK from other countries and some UK-trained doctors have taken the opportunity to experience working overseas,” said Niall Dickson, chief executive of the GMC.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/aug/23/new-doctors-leave-nhs-for-better-life-abroad

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A GP listening to a patient’s chest in 1948. Today GP vacancies remain unfilled and older doctors are retiring early.

Filed under: GP's, NHS, , , ,

You Will Survive: Guide for newly qualified doctors from the BMJ

Tips for students and junior doctors

The BMJ’s social networking site, doc2doc, has just published an e-book that resulted from an online discussion on how to survive as a junior doctor. Here is a selection of tips. Download the whole e-book for free at at http://doc2doc.bmj.com.

http://student.bmj.com/student/view-article.html?id=sbmj.b3175

You can download “You Will Survive” PDF guide here….  you will survive

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Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, , ,

NHS patients may face widescale charges, warns financial thinktank

Health budget must rise, or patient fees increase and services diminish, public finance institute warns ministers in bleak assessment of ‘short-term’ pledges

Ministers will have to consider charging patients for seeing a GP, attending A&E, and using the food, power and water of hospitals, unless better long-term solutions for funding the NHS can be found, public finance experts have warned. Contributions towards the cost of treatments and patients taking out health insurance are among other options that must be on the table if the comprehensive spending review in November fails to address the issue, the Chartered Institute of Public Finance (Cipfa) says in a briefing.

The document says that the hope of NHS leaders to save £22bn over five years to 2020-21 is optimistic and does not take account of David Cameron’s pledge to increase seven-day services nor of the introduction of the new national living wage.  Other general aspirations, such as making the UK a “world leader” in tackling cancer and dementia and raising spending on mental health, have not been explicitly costed either, Cipfa says.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/aug/05/nhs-patients-may-face-widescale-charges-warns-financial-thinktank

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Filed under: A&E, GP's, Hospital, NHS, ,

NHS England announces new plan to meet emergency care targets

A drive to make more one-stop shops for urgent and emergency care will be announced on Friday as the NHS in England seeks to remedy its failure to meet its target for dealing with 95% of A&E patients within four hours last winter.

NHS England announced eight “vanguard” areas to transform services. Among the measures are the acceleration of the development of GP services in hospitals, mobile treatment centres using ambulance staff, and same-day crisis response teams including GP’s and other acute home-visiting professionals. More mental health street triage services will also be rolled out, along with initiatives involving a broader role for community pharmacists.

The moves, designed to break down barriers between primary care and hospitals, are among £200m worth of experiments. The NHS hopes these will be as successful as the setting up of regional major trauma units three years ago, which are said to have brought about a 50% increase in the odds of survival for patients and saved hundreds of lives.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/jul/24/nhs-england-announces-eight-vanguard-areas-emergency-care-targets

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Filed under: A&E, GP's, Hospital, NHS, , , , ,

Exposure: NHS Out of Hours Undercover

An undercover probe into  Care UK , Britain’s biggest provider of out-of-hours services, has revealed patients are put at “huge risk”.

Click on the link below to watch. Only on ITVplayer for 30 days. Don’t miss it  

https://www.itv.com/itvplayer/exposure-nhs-out-of-hours-undercover

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Healthcare providers face fines for missing the national four-hour target for all emergency departments to conclude 95% of cases. But covert footage has suggested doctors are discharging patients when they near the limit. They continue to receive treatment later on, but off the books. Suzanne Mason, professor of Emergency medicine at the University of Sheffield, said: “By discharging somebody off your system before they’ve left the department, there’s a huge risk something could happen to that patient.”

The month-long probe by ITV’s Exposure, presented by Mark Austin was broadcast on Wednesday night 22nd July which exposed major concerns at Care UK’s 24-hour Ealing Urgent Care Centre, West London.

One doctor told an undercover reporter he discharged a patient to meet the target. He said: “It’s all… playing the game. I’ve discharged her, but I’m still dealing with her. So as far as statistics are concerned she was discharged within four hours.” Two days later, the same doctor said he had discharged another patient before treatment finished. He added: “It happens a lot.”

Care UK said both the firm and doctor “refuted any suggestion patients have been discharged before treatment is complete”. The probe into Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt’s NHS also revealed patients were given thermometers to take their temperature, to determine which were seen first. Care UK, which had a turnover of more than £700million last year, said “this does not appear to be good practice”, and it “will undertake any retraining necessary.” Other alleged failings included empty medicine cabinets, and work experience students being told to check up on patients when staff were busy. Care UK said: “Stocks of medications are monitored closely.” It added students should not have been asked to check up on patients.

 

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, Named & Shamed, NHS, NHS Blunders, Whistleblowing, , , ,

New app to record patients’ medical information

A ‘REALLY USEFUL’ TOOL

Katherine Murphy, chief executive of the Patients Association says the app could help offset problems caused by the loss of medical notes, and adds: “Notes going missing is a big problem – they frequently go missing and are not with patients when they have appointments, so to have an app that records your information will be really useful.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.irishnews.com/lifestyle/2015/07/22/news/headline-195604/

Click on the link to support MyNotes Medical

http://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/mynotesmedical

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Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, , ,

Using technology to negotiate medical minefields

MyNotes Medical  http://www.mynotesmedical.com   will be designed to enable patients and carers to make text, video, audio and photo notes on digital devices while with a doctor, or soon after. Notes can be saved in date order to a fully secure server and/or PC. Personal files are visible through logging in with an ID and password. Personal information and treatment/medication details can also be added.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/13439253.display/

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Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS

I’m determined that my mother’s death won’t be in vain – Belfast Telegraph

Blogger and health campaigner Joanna Slater has developed an app in a bid to help tackle communication breakdowns between medics and patients. By Lisa Salmon

Have you ever left a medical appointment and suddenly thought you didn’t understand or can’t remember exactly what the doctor said? Or are you one of the patients whose notes have gone missing?

Health campaigner Joanna Slater is developing an app to help address these very things, called MyNotes Medical, which will enable people to make audio or text recordings of consultations and list treatments and medications they’ve received.

Along with co-founder Brad Meyer, she has now set up a crowdfunding site in a bid to raise money to put the finishing touches to the app, and they hope to be able to launch it later this year.

For Slater, reaching this point was triggered by personal experience. Her 85-year-old mother, Kay, died in hospital in January 2008, six months after being admitted for hip surgery.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/life/features/im-determined-that-my-mothers-death-wont-be-in-vain-31380133.html

Mum 10th Oct 2007

My mother in hospital on her 85th Birthday and me with my two sisters

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, , , ,

Why do I need MyNotes Medical? Warning: Lack of notes can kill

We want to ask you:

What if better communication between patient and NHS could prevent needless illness or death?

Warning: Lack of notes can kill!

Every year, thousands of NHS patients suffer needlessly. Doctors are over­worked, mistakes are made and billions of pounds are wasted. The question is, why?

If you have ever been a patient, or your loved one has, you may know for yourself the confusion and stress that often occurs:

  • You don’t understand what the doctor or consultant is saying
  • Your story is not taken seriously
  • You find it difficult to recall your diagnosis or treatment, since you have no notes to refer to
  • Perhaps, as a result you are sent away with the wrong diagnosis, or you have to make several appointments.

This is critical:

You don’t understand everything that the medical professionals are asking or saying to you; no one seems to have access to your loved one’s medical history and you are worried that you may generalise, delete or distort something critical when telling people what they need to know. All of this wastes precious time in which you or your loved one could be receiving proper treatment.

The problem is down to a breakdown in communication between patient and consultant. And, the problem has been publicly recognised and acknowledged.

Trouble is, all too often the solution has been developed by medical professionals for the ‘benefit’ of patients but NOT by patients themselves and NOT from a patient’s perspective.

Would you feel better if you could

Take Video’s,  Record conversations, Take Photo’s that are automatically synchronised with your PC in date order to review, share and keep you in control?

Yes! That’s why you and your loved ones need MyNotes Medical. Written by Patients for Patients.

You are just one click away  http://goo.gl/3rf9c7

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Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, Self Help, , , ,

Dementia patients being failed by social services, say GPs

Most doctors believe social services do not do enough to make sure people suffering from dementia have company and enough to eat

Dementia patients are being failed by social services who do not check if they are suffering from lonliness or malnourishment, GPs claim. A survey of 1000 doctors by the Alzheimer’s Society found that fewer than one in ten think people with dementia get enough statutory support to maintain a good diet or have adequate company. Three in five GPs (61 per cent) say lack of cooperation between the NHS and social care acts as a barrier to patients getting support, while many (73 per cent) also think patients, families and carers are left confused by the health and social care system.

The charity said that hundreds of thousands of people were being let down and called for the Government to ensure that everyone diagnosed with dementia is entitled to a full package of support including a Dementia Adviser. It also wants to see better help and support available for carers, with a single point of contact available to help them navigate the health and social care system.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/elder/11719300/Dementia-patients-being-failed-by-social-services-say-GPs.html

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Filed under: Dementia, GP's, NHS, , ,

Are you caring for a loved one or know someone that is? Is it going well? Are you worried?

Are you caring for a loved one? Is it going well? Would it be really useful to have a tool that you could keep notes instantly, keep an eye on what the doctors are saying and be able to go back on your notes?

Yes! well please look at MyNotes Medical which is to safeguard our loved ones.
MyNotes Medical will single-handedly revolutionize the health care system!

This little app will prevent so much suffering, anguish and heartache on the part of patients, their carers and families. It will also unquestionable save many, many lives

MyNotes Medical is long overdue, and needs your financial support now!

It is imperative that we get the funding we need to launch this project. Your help is desperately needed, however small. Please go to our website http://goo.gl/3rf9c7

Please help us to help you and your loved ones and Together we can make a difference

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Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, , , , ,

NHS 111 investigation: 10 things we’ve learned

Failing to send ambulances to potential emergencies; watching Game of Thrones in between calls; changing data to meet targets – and more

Patients who call the NHS 111 service are being denied ambulances, even if they are experiencing symptoms of a heart attack, a Telegraph investigation has revealed.

The 111 service was set up as a non-emergency alternative to 999 to relieve pressure on the health system, including A&E departments.

An undercover investigation found that staff at a 111 call centre in Oxfordshire were told that there were not enough ambulances to send to everyone in need.

“People are having heart attacks, they’re not breathing, they’re not getting ambulances,” the undercover reporter was told.

Here we examine 10 of the details to have emerged in our seven-week investigation.

Please click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/nhs/11708938/NHS-111-investigation-10-things-weve-learned.html

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Speeding ambulance

Filed under: A&E, GP's, Hospital, NHS, ,

Please show me that you really care

Do you want to make people’s lives better?

Do you want to make your children’s and your parents lives better?

Are you concerned with the amount of medical mistakes in the news?

Are you a thinker or a doer?

Do you really care? 

Click on the link and show me that you really care http://goo.gl/3rf9c7

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Filed under: A&E, Cancer, Care Homes, Dementia, Disabilities, Elderly, GP's, Hospital, Mental Health, Named & Shamed, NHS, NHS Blunders, Self Help, Uncategorized, Whistleblowing, , ,

How Will MyNotes Medical work for you? Watch our walk-through slides

We have had a fantastic response regarding MyNotes Medical, but people are still unsure how MyNotes Medical works.

Here is a short slide presentation walkthrough how the programme will work. We NEED your support to help us to help you. Please pledge your support on our link http://goo.gl/3rf9c7  Thank you, Together We Can Make A Difference Joanna 

 

Filed under: A&E, Cancer, Care Homes, Dementia, Disabilities, Elderly, GP's, Hospital, Mental Health, Named & Shamed, NHS, NHS Blunders, Self Help, Uncategorized, Whistleblowing, ,

Health boss warns GPs risking mental health and suicide

The amount of GPs seeking help for work-related stress and mental health problems is increasing according to the former head of the Royal College of GPs.

Dr Clare Gerada told the BBC that doctors are taking their own lives due to the pressure.

Breakfast’s Tim Muffett has been to meet some GPs who are struggling to keep up with the work.

Click on the link to watch this BBC report

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-33281930

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Filed under: GP's, , ,

When it’s time to fire your doctor by Dr Owen Wiese

Dr Owen Wiese says the difference between negligence and an honest mistake is a fine line in the medical profession. Here are some examples of just plain bad doctoring he’s seen.

“Doctors bury their mistakes” is a sad, but unfortunately not completely untrue saying.

A study published in the British Medical Journal Quality and Safety in 2013 estimates that 10 to 15% of diagnoses made by doctors are completely wrong. (The study also found major diagnostic discrepancies in 10-20% of autopsy cases.). In fact, medical care is the third leading cause of death in the United States. I’m sure in South Africa things may not be much different, even if they are for different reasons.

As a GP in my ‘previous life’, I encountered rather strange diagnoses made by my colleagues in clinical practice.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.health24.com/Columnists/When-doctors-are-negligent-misdiagnose-and-make-mistakes-20150624

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Filed under: GP's, Hospital, , ,

Six out of 10 doctors in Wales bullied for raising safety concerns, says damning BMA report

Dr Phil Banfield, chair of the association, says the figures from a survey of doctors and consultants in secondary care are ‘hugely worrying’

Six out of 10 doctors and consultants in Wales say they have been bullied or harassed for raising concerns about patient safety to senior managers. That is just one of the damning statistics from a survey of doctors and consultants in secondary care released today by the British Medical Association (BMA). The association’s Welsh Council chairman, Dr Phil Banfield, has called the findings “hugely worrying” and called on the Welsh Government to “create a culture of support”.

The report goes on to suggest that doctors and consultants think the NHS in Wales is riven with poor leadership and a lack of direction from hospital managers, and that serious mistakes are avoided more by luck than sound planning and robust systems.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/six-out-10-doctors-wales-9497328

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Filed under: GP's, Hospital, Named & Shamed, NHS, ,

New duty of candour legislation creates ‘two-tier health system’

The Health Secretary has been warned that he faces legal action unless he revises the new regulations requiring NHS and social care institutions to hold their hands up and admit when something has gone wrong in a patient’s treatment.

The new regulations, called duty of candour, were widely welcomed when they were brought in following the scandal at Mid-Staffordshire trust. They require patients or their relatives to be told when an incident during treatment has caused significant harm. The rules apply to NHS and private health care and social care providers.

But now leading patient charity, Action Against Medical Accidents (AvMA) has said the way the regulations have been drafted means that private clinics and hospitals and GP surgeries could avoid admitting harm in cases where cause and effect are less obvious.

AvMA has now given the Department of Health until Friday 19th June to respond or it will seek a judicial review. Their argument hinges on the words “could lead to”.

Click on the link to read more

http://blogs.channel4.com/victoria-macdonald-on-health-and-social-care/duty-candour-rules-applied-equally/3076http:/bit.ly/1GuT7vx

 

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Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS,

NHS recruiter says the Government needs to recruit more foreign doctors to meet its targets

The Government must allow the NHS to recruit more doctors from abroad if it is to meet its targets to boost GP numbers, a leading recruiter has said.

The Conservative manifesto called for the health service to take on 5,000 more GPs to help surgeries extend opening hours. The reform is part of a long-term strategy to move care out of hospitals and into local surgeries, thought to be a more efficient way of delivering treatment.

But ManpowerGroup Solutions UK, one of the biggest recruiters of GPs for the NHS, said there were not enough “homegrown” GPs to accomplish the policy. “David Cameron has pledged to recruit 5,000 new GPs to extend surgery opening hours. That will improve care for millions, but it’s hard to see where those doctors will come from,” said James Hick, managing director of the group.

“As a major recruiter of GPs, we see that there are not enough homegrown new clinicians. There’s no simple fix – even if we were to double the number of medical school graduates from British universities, it still wouldn’t solve the problem. “We’re already reliant on doctors and nurses from abroad. Twenty six percent are non-British and that number could rise by 50% over the next five years.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/nhs-recruiter-says-the-government-needs-to-recruit-more-foreign-doctors-to-meet-its-targets-10306941.html

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Hiring an extra 5,000 GPs would be very difficult without overseas recruitment, major recruiter says

 

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, , , ,

‘Severe shortage’ of GPs could see traditional family doctor become a thing of past

Rising patient numbers and amounts of paperwork are forcing more GPs out of full time work, putting surgeries at risk of following the same rocky financial path as Britain’s struggling hospitals. Hospitals have come under fire for “wasting” £3.3bn annually on locum doctors and now local GP surgeries are forking out £70-£90 an hour for agency staff.

Medical insiders explained the pressures to squeeze in millions more patients, as well as being able to complete growing amounts of administration, meant many were put off from running their own practices. Many GPs also want to work more flexibly to fit work in around their children. It means the tradition of having a family doctor from cradle to grave could soon be a thing of the past.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/583174/Shortage-of-GPs-could-see-life-long-family-doctor-become-a-thing-of-the-past

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GPs are so stressed they are quitting to become locums and avoid paperwork

Filed under: GP's, NHS, , ,

A&E swamped as thousands can’t get in to see GPs: Patients placing huge pressure on units after being refused same-day appointments at surgeries

  • Many have non-urgent issues but can’t be seen quickly by family doctors
  • Experts want more GPs, nurses & primary care staff at A&E departments 
  • People refusing to use alternative services such as 111 or walk-in clinics 
  • Patients see A&E as recognisable ‘brand’ so will continue to go there

Thousands of people are flooding A&E because they have been refused a same-day appointment with their GP, a report has found. Patients are placing huge pressure on casualty wards as they arrive in ever larger numbers. Many have non-urgent health problems that could easily be dealt with at a localsurgery but they are unable to be seen promptly by family doctors.  Now experts have called for more GPs, nurses and other primary care staff to be stationed at A&E departments to deal with patients who do not really need emergency care.

The report, published today by the Royal College of Emergency Medicine and the Patients Association, found that many Britons are also refusing to use alternative services such as the NHS 111 helpline, walk-in clinics or out-of-hours GP services. The document says A&E is seen as a recognisable ‘brand’ by patients so they will continue to go there even if other services are available.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3108414/A-E-swamped-thousands-t-GPs-Patients-placing-huge-pressure-units-refused-day-appointments-surgeries.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

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Filed under: A&E, GP's, Hospital, , ,

Hunt reveals priorities for his NHS ‘mission’ By Will Hazell, Dave West. LGC

Prime minister David Cameron confirmed Mr Hunt would stay in his role, which he has held since autumn 2012, as he reshuffled his Cabinet in the Conservative Party’s new majority government. Responding to the news that he had been reappointed as health secretary, Mr Hunt said he was “humbled…not least because of the enormous responsibility for hundreds of thousands of doctors, nurses and other NHS staff who are working incredibly hard right now and under enormous pressure”.

Mr Hunt said the NHS had “started a journey” to make the NHS the “safest, most caring and highest quality healthcare system in the world” but added “there is still further to go”.  “My biggest priority now is to transform care outside hospitals – just as we have dramatically improved the quality of care inside hospitals in the last few years.”  He said to ensure older and vulnerable people were treated with “the highest standards of care” there needed to be a “step change” in services delivered by GP surgeries, community care and social care.

“That is my mission, and I know it is the mission of the whole NHS too,” he added.

Click on the link to read more  Hunt reveals priorities for his NHS

 

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Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, ,

NHS tests and drugs ‘do more harm than good’ Senior doctors say

Senior doctors have warned that patients are given drugs and tests they may not need because GPs and hospitals are paid for the quantity of treatment

The Academy of Medical Royal Colleges said patients should be encouraged to ask if their medical procedures were really necessary, in a bid to halt over-diagnosis and needless treatment of swathes of the population. In an unprecedented intervention,the medics – who represent all 21 medical royal colleges in the UK  – said too many patients were being forced to endure tests and treatments which could do more harm than good. They said the payments system in the NHS, which means hospitals are paid according to the number of procedures they perform, and GP pay linked to diagnosis and treatment, could act against patients’ interests. The senior doctors said it was time to “wind back the harms of too much medicine” and replace a culture of “more is better” with balanced decision making.

Patients should be encouraged to ask questions such as, ‘Do I really need this test or procedure? What are the risks? Are there simpler safer options? What happens if I do nothing,’ the doctors say.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/11601032/NHS-tests-and-drugs-do-more-harm-than-good.html

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Filed under: GP's, NHS

Nurses criticised at GP practices placed into ‘special measures’ By Nicola Merrifield, Nursing Times

A group of GP practices have been placed into special measures after inspectors raised concerns, including a lack of staff learning following safety incidents, failure by nurses to understand mental capacity legislation and outdated training on vaccinations.

As part of its inspections of general practice, the Care Quality Commission released reports on a further 61 GP services in England last week. The reports reveal that four – Constable Country Rural Medical Practice in Ipswich, New Inn Surgery in Guildford, Dr Alan Samuel Muir Grasse in north London and Polkyth Surgery in Cornwall – have been rated as “inadequate” and put into special measures, which means they must improve or risk losing their registration.

Click on the link below to read more

Nurses criticised at GP practices placed into ‘special measures’

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Filed under: GP's, NHS, , , ,

Exclusive: New government must put election pledges aside and tackle GP crisis, warns GPC

The newly elected UK government must put ‘unrealistic’ election pledges on GP access aside and invest rapidly to support a profession on the verge of collapse, the GPC warned as Conservative leader David Cameron looked set to return to Downing Street for a second term.

With the Conservative government on track to win a shock majority after the 2015 general election, GPC chairman Dr Chaand Nagpaul warned that now was the time to ‘get real about the crisis facing general practice’. ‘We have an immediate crisis to address,’ he told GPonline, ‘and we need to put behind us the unrealistic populist election pledges, to address the issues and what is undeniably a crisis of workforce and workload.’ His comments come after the RCGP warned that the political parties’ election pledges on GP recruitment could take up to 30 years to deliver.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.gponline.com/exclusive-new-government-put-election-pledges-aside-tackle-gp-crisis-warns-gpc/article/1346379

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Dr Chaand Nagpaul: government must tackle GP crisis (Photo: Pete Hill)

Filed under: GP's, NHS,

Robbie Powell died 25 years ago aged 10. Difficult to believe that this 4 part ‘Wales This Week’ documentary was aired 11 years ago and yet the NHS cover up continues 25 years after Robbie’s needles death

There was sufficient evidence to prosecute the killer/dishonest GPs in 2003 but Crown Prosecution Service said NO! The three reasons below were given for not prosecuting the GPs and their secretary:

1. Passage of time! [Not relevant in cases of child sex abuse and other crimes]

2. Police/CPS FAILURES! [More like Police/CPS corruption to protect the establishment employed police doctors]

3. Police IMMUNITY! [The Police does not have the gift of immunity and even if they had it is only given when the perpetrators assist in the prosecution of others and not as a favour for police employed doctors]

When will the 25 year cover up of Robbie’s death be investigated and the perpetrators of these heinous crimes IMPRISONED?

Will the Director of Public Prosecutions do the right thing this time? Will Powell

Part 1 of 4

Click on the link below to watch the 3 other parts of  “Wales This Week” documentary  https://strength-in-numbers.co.uk/r/

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, , ,

NHS in war on staff drug use

DOZENS of stressed out NHS workers have been suspended, disciplined or sacked for alcohol and drugs abuse in Scotland.

Around 80 medical staff were temporarily banned from their duties because of substance abuse, with a further 54 facing additional disciplinary action. Up to 20 lost their jobs because of drink and drugs issues while some 50 were offered treatment to overcome their addiction. But it is thought the figures, obtained under Freedom of Information legislation and excluding Tayside and Grampian health boards, represent only the tip of the iceberg.

UK wide, around 100 cases involving substance abuse end up in front of the regulatory body, the General Medical Council (GMC), every year. A support organisation for dentists and doctors struggling with drugs and alcohol admitted it was a huge issue which was simply not being discussed.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/571443/NHS-war-staff-drug-use

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Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, , , , ,

Can the NHS attract more GPs? By Siobhan Chan, GP online

With recent figures showing that more than one in five GPs in the UK has been trained abroad, it is clear that overseas-trained GPs are sorely needed in the NHS. The Induction and Refresher (I&R) Scheme, launched by Health Education England, NHS England, the BMA and the RCGP this month, aims to make it easier for overseas GPs to practise in the UK, to encourage UK-trained GPs back from abroad, and to bring back GPs from career breaks. It offers a £2,300-a-month bursary for GPs going through an induction and assessment programme. But doctors applying to work in the UK say that while the I&R scheme is an improvement on previous ‘haphazard’ local initiatives, it still needs major changes.

As part of the scheme, GPs have to take a multiple choice clinical knowledge test (MCQ), and are assigned a supervised placement for two weeks to six months based on their performance, before they can be put on the performers list. But with some GPs reporting long waits, repeated checks and bureaucracy, and warning that overseas colleagues have been deterred from practising in the UK, will the I&R scheme boost GP numbers?

Click on the link to read more

http://www.gponline.com/nhs-attract-gps/article/1343021

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Vacancies: Can the I&R scheme boost GP recruitment?

Filed under: GP's, NHS, ,

NHS stress: a third of GPs plan to retire in next five years

A third of GP’s in the UK plan to retire in the next five years because of high stress levels, unmanageable workloads and too little time with patients, in a move that would exacerbate the existing difficulty of getting an appointment.

A poll of 15,560 GPs by the British Medical Association (BMA) has found that 34% intend to stop working by 2020, with many others going part-time, moving abroad or even abandoning medicine altogether. The findings thrust the issue of GP numbers into the election spotlight as the BMA accused the political parties of making “absurd” promises to tackle what it called a “crisis” and of ignoring the reasons why NHS general practice is facing a worsening shortage of medics.

Dr Chaand Nagpaul, chair of the BMA’s GPs committee, said: “It is clear that incredible pressures on GP services are at the heart of this problem, with escalating demand having far outstripped capacity. “GPs are overworked and intensely frustrated that they do not have enough time to spend with their patients, especially the increasing numbers of older people with multiple and complex problems who need specialised care.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/apr/15/nhs-stress-third-gps-plan-retire-five-years

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Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, , , , ,

A Doctor’s Manifesto for the NHS – An Open Letter by Dr Zoe Norris GP – Posted in The Huffington Post

Dear Mr Hunt, Mr Burnham, Mr Lamb, Ms Bours, Dr Creasy, Ms Robison, and Ms Jones,

I have watched with interest over the last few days as your policies and promises regarding the NHS have been publicised. On reflection, I think perhaps you need a few pointers. I am a doctor; I am a GP working in the service that sees 90% of patients the NHS deals with every day. I hope you won’t take offence at this letter, but your health policies, well, they are dreadful. I’m sure there are teachers up and down the country who feel your education policies are the same. Service personnel who feel similarly about your defence policies and so on. All I know is I am doing the job you are all purporting to improve, save, fund – whatever. And you are all wrong. My disclaimer is this – I am genuinely an undecided voter. Largely because I can’t believe a word of what most of you say about the NHS, but if a party did admit that the NHS is a bottomless pit of money, and that they would truly engage with doctors, nurses, and the many other NHS staff to try and improve it and its use, instead of constantly encouraging the privatisation and consumerism of our most basic public service, you would have my vote in a heartbeat.

Allow me to briefly critique your current manifestos. I haven’t separated them by party because let’s be honest, they’re much the same.

Click on the link below to read more

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/dr-zoe-norris/nhs-general-election-2015_b_7047060.html

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Dr Zoe Norris

Filed under: GP's, NHS, , , ,

Policy guide: Where the parties stand – Health and Care

This is a guide to political parties’ positions on key issues and will be updated as each manifesto is launched.

This issue includes NHS funding, GP access and social care, particularly of older people.

Click on the link to read

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/election/2015/manifesto-guide#tab=issue!issue=health!party=!nation=uk

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Filed under: Elderly, GP's, Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , ,

Nine in 10 GPs say no to seven day opening

Almost all GPs do not want their own practice to open seven days a week, a poll of 15,000 doctors has found.

Plans for 7 day access to GPs are the key Conservative manifesto health pledge, along with improved hospital services at weekends. But the British Medical Association (BMA) survey found that 94 per cent of family doctors do not want their own surgery to offer seven day opening. The reluctance came despite the fact half of those polled thought practices should offer more extended hours to their patients. Under the Tory pledge, all patients would be able to access a GP seven days a week for routine appointments, seven days a week, by 2020.

Under the plan, groups of GP surgeries will be encouraged to band together in order to share the workload at evenings and weekends, so that not every practice has to open. One in five doctors polled said they were willing provide some extended hours by working in networks. However, the flat rejection of the idea of their own surgery opening seven days suggests major battles ahead.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/11523739/Nine-in-10-GPs-say-no-to-seven-day-opening.html

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Filed under: GP's, NHS, Uncategorized, , ,

Senior doctors assess government’s record on NHS – letter in full

More than 100 senior professionals write in a personal capacity outlining their view of how the NHS in England has fared under the coalition

After five years of a government which pledged to protect the NHS, this election campaign makes it timely to assess its stewardship, since 2010, of England’s most precious institution. Our verdict, as doctors working in and for the NHS, is that history will judge that this administration’s record is characterised by broken promises, reductions in necessary funding, and destructive legislation, which leaves health services weaker, more fragmented, and less able to perform their vital role than at any time in the NHS’s history.

In short, the coalition has failed to keep its NHS  pledges.

Click on the link to read in full and the doctors who have put their name to the letter.

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/apr/07/senior-doctors-assess-governments-record-on-nhs-letter-in-full

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Pledge to protect the NHS … a Conservative party election poster from 2010

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, , , , , , ,

Survival guide all NHS patients must read: A leading doctor’s insider tips on getting the treatment you need – By Dr Phil Hammond For The Daily Mail

When I first walked on to an NHS ward, in 1984, patients were often discouraged from taking an active part in their own care. Some weren’t even told if they had a serious diagnosis, such as cancer or dementia. We assumed that you weren’t able to contribute, didn’t want to know, or that telling you might make you more anxious and unable to cope. And doctors didn’t waste emotion or energy on those difficult conversations about death and disability. But not knowing your diagnosis meant you couldn’t possibly participate in crucial decisions about your care, involve your loved ones or plan properly for the future. So patients had to fend for themselves.

Thankfully, times have changed. Evidence now suggests that the more involved you are – and are allowed to be – as a patient, the more likely you are to get the right care for you. Humans often take the path of least resistance and, when you’re ill, it’s usually easiest to lie back and let the professionals get on with it. But if you have a long-term illness, there comes a time when you need to get more involved and speak up, so your care can be built around your needs and priorities.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3027921/Survival-guide-NHS-patients-read-leading-doctor-s-insider-tips-getting-treatment-need.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

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Carrying a printed copy of your medical records with all the key information can make a huge difference

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, , , , ,

Could the statutory duty of candour backfire? By Will Powell

I was very interested to read an article recently published by the British Medical Association [“BMA”] with the heading: “Statutory duty of candour could backfire”.  It never ceases to amaze me that any individual doctor let alone an organisation associated with the medical profession could claim publicly that being open and honest about medical mistakes could in any way be detrimental to patient safety. This is the very culture, in my view, that made the need for the introduction of a ‘legal’ duty of candour absolutely necessary – honesty should be the foundation for all doctor patient relationships!

Although rarely accepted and denied by the government the absence of a duty of candour was first exposed in the High Court in Cardiff in 1996. It was highlighted by the case of our son Robbie Powell who died in April 1990. Doctors responsible for Robbie’s death had been untruthful about the circumstances of Robbie’s negligent death, falsified the child’s medical records and post death caused psychological damage to my wife and me by exacerbating our grief as a consequence of their dishonesty. The UK Courts ruled that because doctors had no post death ‘legal’ duty to be honest to parents, in such circumstances, the case was struck-out.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.mistreatment.com/news/article/could-the-statutory-duty-of-candour-backfire-269/#.VRZt2fmsXuK

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Will Powell

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , , ,

Is the NHS getting safer? This is one of a series of overviews, looking at key areas of quality: safety, waiting times, mental health, person-centred care and international comparisons. The Health Foundation, Authors John Illingworth

This overview considers how the NHS has performed over the current parliament in relation to patient safety. We look at data relating to reported incidents and harm, episodes of care free of certain types of harm, and patient and staff perceptions of safety.

  •  Harm caused by health care affects every health system in the world; the NHS is no exception. Research from the UK suggests that around 8-12% of admissions to hospitals will involve an adverse event, resulting in harm to the patient. Between half and one third of these adverse events are thought to be preventable. Similar figures are reported in international studies.
  • The NHS has made great progress in tackling some specific causes of harm in hospitals. The number of people developing infections such as MRSA as a result of their care has remained low during this parliament. The proportion of patients receiving care that is free of four common adverse events, including pressure ulcers, has increased from 91% in July 2012 to 94% in February 2015.
  • Staff reporting of hospital safety incidents continues to improve. There has been a sustained increase in the reporting of incidents during this parliament, while the percentage of staff saying they have witnessed an incident has remained roughly the same. This suggests that the proportion of hospital incidents going unreported has declined.
  • Some warning signs are emerging among the NHS workforce. During this parliament, the percentage of staff who say there is a blame culture in their organisation has risen, as has the percentage of staff who have reported feeling unwell because of work-related stress. Around 40% of patients feel there aren’t always enough nurses on duty to care for them.
  • We don’t know how safe health care services are outside of hospital. There is little published evidence from which to draw conclusions about levels of harm in primary and community care. Less than 1% of all reported incidents are in primary care, despite 90% of all patient contact taking place there, suggesting significant underreporting of harm in this care setting.

Click the PDF below to download the overview 

Swimming Against The Tide Briefing The Health Foundation

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http://www.health.org.uk/publications/is-the-nhs-getting-safer/

 

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , , , ,

Patients who criticised their GP surgery online get ‘threatening’ letters from the practice telling them to find a new doctor

A group of patients who criticised their local GP surgery on Facebook have been told to consider finding a new doctor in an attempt to stifle negative feedback online. Staff at the Trent Meadows Medical Practice near Burton, Staffordshire, had been monitoring social media comments and culprits have since been sent ‘threatening’ letters.

Sylvia Blackshaw, 35, had written that on three occasions she waited for 90 minutes for an appointment for her newborn baby. But she was later accused of abusive behaviour by the surgery who branded it ‘inappropriate patient behaviour’ and warned her that she should consider finding an ‘alternative practice’.

Mrs Blackshaw had said ‘OMG. Demand a recount!’ in a comment on a glowing report for the surgery from health watchdog the Care Quality Commission on her local paper’s Facebook page.

A fortnight later a letter sent to her home from the surgery said: ‘We have a zero tolerance for inappropriate patient behaviour which is either face to face, over the telephone or on social media networks and do not accept this from our patients.’

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3000389/Patients-criticised-GP-surgery-online-threatening-letters-practice-telling-new-doctor.html

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Row: Jenny Wheeldon, left, and Sylvia Blackshaw, right with son Jake, have been told to consider finding a new GP after their surgery saw their criticism online. Warning: This letter below from GP partner Judith Crosse has also been sent to other critics
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Filed under: GP's, NHS, Uncategorized, , ,

Health regulator has failed and is not fit for purpose, says CQC chairman

The regulator, which is responsible for ensuring high standards of care are upheld across the country’s hospitals, GP surgeries and care homes, has been accused of not acting quickly enough or thoroughly investigating scandals relating to Mid Stafford Hospital and Winterbourne View care home. The British Medical Association added that it had “no confidence” in the regulator last June after allegations of a cover-up over inspections at a children’s hospital in Cumbria.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.edp24.co.uk/news/health_regulator_has_failed_and_is_not_fit_for_purpose_says_cqc_chairman_1_3339205

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David Prio, former chairman at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital.

Filed under: Care Homes, GP's, Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , ,

How patients can help we GPs make the NHS run better by Dr David Turner, GP working in London

The patient in front of me is five minutes late for her 10-minute appointment. As she sits down she tells me she is feeling suicidal, as her father has just been diagnosed with cancer and she is about to be evicted from her flat for non-payment of rent. It is 9.05am on a Monday and the waiting room is already standing room only. This is a slightly extreme scenario, but it does happen. Whenever general practice is discussed in news reports, the main complaint seems to be that people cannot get appointments with their GP. There are many reasons for this. Chronic underfunding, combined with ever-increasing unfunded work being dumped on us are two major reasons why it is harder to see your family doctor. Another important reason, which the media seems to pay scant attention to, is the misuse of the system by patients themselves.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/healthcare-network/views-from-the-nhs-frontline/2015/mar/16/patients-help-gps-nhs-run-better?CMP=share_btn_tw

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Filed under: GP's,

Fears over death wish databases that doctors say mean elderly could be left to die at home rather than saved at hospital

Do you think it’s a good idea to construct computer databases containing the details of how elderly people want to die in hospital or at home? 

Please fill in our one question survey

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/dying

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A ‘worrying’ scheme to construct a series of computer databases containing the details of how every elderly person wants to die is being recommended by MPs.

They are pressing Ministers to push ahead with a universal system for recording people’s death wishes – despite fears people could be denied life-saving hospital treatment. Doctors or nurses would ask elderly patients where they want to die and whether they would prefer treatment to be withheld if all appears lost. Their wishes would then be added to databases to be shared with GPs, hospital staff and ambulance crews.  The Health Select Committee wants to reduce the number of dying patients being ferried to hospital for ‘unnecessary’ reasons. While around seven in 10 people say they want to die in their own homes, only two in 10 actually do. Too often, according to a report from the committee today, doctors carry information about where and how their patients want to die ‘in their heads’. Under the new system, if a patient has indicated they want to die at home, this information will be passed to paramedics called to an emergency.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2995242/Fears-death-wish-databases-doctors-say-mean-elderly-left-die-home-saved-hospital.html

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Filed under: Elderly, GP's, Hospital, NHS, , , ,

GP’s told to let older doctors go home early – to prevent mistakes

Do you think older doctors should be allowed to go home at 4pm, or should they retire? Please fill in our one question survey

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/Older-Doctors

*****

Older doctors should be allowed to go home at 4pm to stop errors occurring, according to new guidance. NHS England says flexible working patterns should be brought in to help older GPs who find their “concentration goes” after 4pm. The advice was given by Kate Staveley, assistant performance director at NHS England’s Bristol, North Somerset, Somerset and South Gloucester area team. Writing in the March newsletter of Devon’s Local Medical Committee, she said: “We are all working harder than we ever have before and if we want to thrive and survive it is essential that we look after ourselves and each other.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/gps-told-older-doctors-go-5

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Tired: Doctors would benefit from more flexible hours

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, , , ,

Scandal of patients dying… just from a cracked rib: NHS ‘failing to use new technique that can stop pneumonia kicking in’

The lives of elderly patients with broken ribs are being put at risk because emergency departments and GPs are failing to refer them for up-to-date assessment and treatment.

Breathing difficulties caused by these injuries can lead to the lung infection pneumonia, which is especially dangerous for older people. A revolutionary two-hour procedure that involves implanting flexible titanium splints to support the fractures while they heal was approved for NHS use in 2010, and has been shown to slash lung infection rates. But according to DePuy Synthes, which manufactures the unique Matrix Rib Fixation System, the implants have been used only in a total of 350 cases – although the Health & Social Care Information Centre say there were 29,401 hospital consultations involving rib fractures last year alone.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2994859/Scandal-patients-dying-just-cracked-rib-NHS-failing-use-new-technique-stop-pneumonia-kicking-in.html

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A revolutionary two-hour procedure that involves implanting flexible titanium splints to support the fractures while they heal was approved for NHS use in 2010, pictured is how the operation works

Filed under: Elderly, GP's, Hospital, NHS, , , , ,

Elderly patients will get consultations with doctors via webcams to reduce pressure on A&E as part of £200 million NHS shake-up

The elderly will undergo consultations via webcams and patients will be offered GP appointments at weekends as part of an NHS shake-up. Simon Stevens, the health service’s chief executive, today announced a £200 million scheme aimed at providing better care for the most vulnerable patients so they don’t end up in hospital. Initially, it involves 29 local projects covering a total of five million patients which will all operate slightly differently depending on the needs of the population. But the hope is to gradually expand these nationwide with the overall aim of treating more patients at home – or at their GP – rather than in hospital. Mr Stevens said the problem with the set-up of the NHS at the moment is that it is too ‘fragmented’, meaning patients are passed ‘from pillar to post’ between the various hospital wards, outpatient clinic and their GP.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2988408/Elderly-patients-consultations-doctors-webcams-reduce-pressure-E-200-million-NHS-shake-up.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

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Filed under: Elderly, GP's, Hospital, NHS, , , ,

NHS calls for British doctors working in Australia to come back and help the shortfall in numbers in the UK

The NHS has been forced to ask British doctors in Australia to come home due to a major shortfall in numbers. Around 1,000 more GPs are urgently needed in England, according to new figures released by the House of Commons library.  It is thought that nearly 1,500 doctors – who cost the taxpayer up to £610,000 to train – move to Australia every year.

To bridge the gap they have been offered a place on a ‘fully funded’ programme, which they can choose to be either full or part time, if they return.  An advert was placed in the Australian Doctor and the Medical Observer by NHS England’s Shropshire and Staffordshire area team and Health Education Midlands earlier this month. It said: ‘This scheme will help you rediscover and enhance the skills you need to return, or start to practise in the UK. ‘It’s fully funded, so you will be supported whilst you complete the programme.’

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2974170/NHS-calls-British-doctors-working-Australia-come-help-shortfall-numbers-UK.html

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Filed under: A&E, GP's, Hospital, NHS, , ,

More than half of GPs expect to leave profession before 60, says BBC survey

More than half of family doctors say they are set to leave the profession early, according to a new survey. The survey of 1,004 GPs across the UK for the BBC’s Inside Out programme found that 56% said they expected to retire or leave before they are 60. Health secretary Jeremy Hunt described the figures as worrying, while Dr Krishna Kasaraneni of the British Medical Association said he was not surprised by them. Dr Kasaraneni said: “Politicians across the board need to acknowledge that general practice is not resourced correctly.”

The survey found that 25% of GPs said they would definitely leave before reaching 60, while 32% said thought they would probably not retire or leave general practice by that age. There were 6% of GPs who said they were definitely not planning to leave the profession before they turned 60.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/mar/02/gps-survey-leave-profession-early-60-bbc-inside-out

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Filed under: GP's, NHS, , ,

‘I was given indigestion pills for tumor in my throat’ “Lucky to be alive”: Bruce Millar

A father who was prescribed indigestion tablets when he had cancer of the oesophagus is campaigning for better awareness of his illness among GPs and the public. Bruce Millar, 57, went to the doctor after having trouble swallowing. He was told it was indigestion and prescribed omeprazole. When his condition did not improve  Mr Millar was referred to surgeon James Gossage at the London Bridge Hospital. He diagnosed cancer of the oesophagus, the disease that killed New Labour strategist Philip Gould.

It is a particularly aggressive form of cancer, but research by Public Health England has found the symptoms are commonly mistaken for heartburn or indigestion. This means death rates are high because many patients are diagnosed at a late stage. Nearly three people a day — 963 in total — died from oesophageal or stomach cancer in London in 2012, and 1,212 were diagnosed.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/health/i-was-given-indigestion-pills-for-tumor-in-my-throat-10068444.html

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“Lucky to be alive”: Bruce Millar had a six-hour operation after his cancer was finally diagnosed

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, ,

Anguish as Coventry grandfather is denied Parkinson’s ‘wonder-drug’ on NHS

A Coventry grandfather has been denied access to a so-called wonder drug that could help reverse the effects of years of damage that Parkinson’s Disease has ravaged on his body. Edward Reilly, known to his friends as Eamonn, was diagnosed with the progressive disease 16 years ago. He has now been told the NHS will not pay for him to at least try the breakthrough drug Duodopa which could ease his symptoms. Duodopa – which is only prescribed as a ‘last resort’ treatment option where other medications have failed – is said to help control involuntary movements, night-time symptoms and help curtail ‘off’ periods. But last year NHS England announced the drug would not be routinely available on the NHS, meaning doctors have to make long and bureaucratic applications on a case-by-case basis.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.coventrytelegraph.net/news/coventry-news/anguish-coventry-grandfather-denied-parkinsons-8696198

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Have you been denied a drug from the NHS that would help you? This is a one question Patient-Centric Survey to this news article: Please click on the link below, and help us with your comments. Thank you, Joanna

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/denied

 

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized,

GPs should check on colleagues who dole out too many antibiotics, NHS watchdogs say

Family doctors should question colleagues who dole out too many antibiotics, NHS watchdogs have said, after research found 97 per cent of patients who ask for the drugs receive them.  The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) has issued draft guidance to clamp down on prescribing of such medication, amid concern that rising resistance to antibiotics is becoming a “catastrophic threat” to the nation’s health. Medical experts say the over-use of antibiotics in the Western world is fuelling infections which resist treatment, and could mean an extra 10 million deaths a year, unless practices change.

The new proposals says GPs should step in if they believe their colleagues are giving antibiotics out too often – and should resist pressure from patients who insist they need the medication. Health officials said NHS professionals needed to question each other, and that patients should be given a proper explanation, when antibiotics are not suitable.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/nhs/11418136/GPs-should-check-on-colleagues-who-dole-out-too-many-antibiotics-NHS-watchdogs-say.html

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Filed under: GP's, , , ,

Exclusive: NHS 111 providers ordered to appoint GPs to redirect cases towards primary care

Exclusive All NHS 111 providers have been told to ensure they have GPs available in call centres or available to give clinical advice at peak times to reduce the burden on ambulance services and redirect cases towards primary care.

In a letter to NHS 111 commissioners and obtained by Pulse, NHS England’s national director of commissioning operations Dame Barbara Hakin said that the plans for GP presence in call centres or available to provide clinical advice should be in place ‘as soon as possible’ to minimise the burden on ambulance services suffering ‘as soon as possible’. Dame Barbara said that pilots of GPs working in call centres had successfully led to ‘diversion to primary care, especially GP out of hours’, as well as some diversion to A&E. Although the letter says increased GP input into NHS 111 is a short-term measure, Pulse understands that NHS England is set to include the appointment of GPs as part of its final directions for commissioners procuring new contracts.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/commissioning/commissioning-topics/urgent-care/nhs-111-providers-ordered-to-appoint-gps-to-redirect-cases-towards-primary-care/20009184.article#.VOMKI_msXuI

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Filed under: GP's, NHS, , ,

GPs to conduct nationality checks in all new patients under health tourism crackdown

Exclusive: GP practices with high populations of EU migrants will be asked to check whether patients are eligible for free NHS care under Government pilots due to launch later this year, Pulse has learnt.

The pilots will be rolled out in 10 areas, and will involve GP practices asking all new patients if they have a valid European Health Insurance Card (EHIC), which entitles them to access primary care and certain secondary care treatment without an upfront charge. Practices will also be asked to collect information on so-called S1 forms from UK state pensioners resident elsewhere in EEA. Under the EHIC pilots, no patient will be charged for accessing primary care. However, the DH said they were designed to test the feasibility of practices routinely asking patients for documents to enable the NHS to recover the costs of primary care from their home countries. The pilots come as the Department of Health prepares to launch a consultation on new ways of recovering the costs of primary care from overseas residents. But a spokesperson refused to confirm if this would include any upfront patient charges for primary care.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/sign-in?rtn=home/finance-and-practice-life-news/gps-to-ask-all-patients-for-ehic-documents-under-health-tourism-crackdown/20009100.article#.VNMv2p2sXuI

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Filed under: GP's, NHS, Uncategorized, , , ,

111 line increasing pressure on NHS, say leading doctors

The figures were produced by the doctors’ union the BMA, which has had long-standing concerns over NHS 111. Doctors’ leaders say increased referrals mean more pressure on already overstretched GPs and hospitals. NHS England says the 111 service is meeting increasing demand. A spokesman said the proportion of referrals to GPs and emergency services had remained steady despite a surge in calls. But the BMA is concerned that the service is not delivering appropriate advice to some patients and this means some are being incorrectly directed to busy hospitals and GP surgeries.

The BMA looked at the outcomes of calls to NHS 111, which was rolled out in March 2013 to replace the old NHS Direct service. In its final full year of operation in 2011-12, NHS Direct received 4.4 million calls from patients. In comparison, calls to NHS 111 increased year-on-year and in 2014 (up to November) it received and responded to more than 15.4 million calls. Referrals from NHS 111 to A&E increased from just under 400,000 calls in 2013 to over a million in 2014. Similarly, referrals to GPs went up from just under 3 million to 8 million between 2013 and 2014.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-31119807

Have you recently used the NHS 111 number? Were you referred to a GP or A&E department? You can share your experiences by emailing  haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk   If you would be happy to speak further to a BBC journalist, please include a contact telephone number.

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Filed under: GP's, Hospital, , , ,

New £10m plan to lure GPs out of retirement

GPs will be encouraged to delay or come back from retirement, under a new £10m scheme attempting to boost the numbers of family doctors. NHS officials said doctors will be offered more flexible ways of working to encourage them back into general practice. In the last three years, the number of unfilled GP posts has quadrupled, to almost 8 per cent. Doctors have raised fears that more than 500 practices could be forced to close soon because almost all of their doctors are over the age of 60, when the average GP retires at 59. The looming crisis could leave more than 1 million patients in the lurch, medics have claimed. NHS England will today announce new schemes, to encourage those considering retirement, and those who have already left general practice, to think again, and look at options to work on a part-time basis.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/11368660/New-10m-plan-to-lure-GPs-out-of-retirement.html

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GPs will be encouraged to delay retirement Photo: Alamy 

Filed under: GP's, Uncategorized, , ,

Why your doctor doesn’t always tell you the truth – Dr Phil Hammond

One reason you trust doctors is because you think we tell you the truth.

But medicine has historically been about disguising, sanitising and spinning the truth. Gently coercing you into the treatment we think is best. All for your own good. We assume you don’t want the whole truth because it isn’t compatible with trust. Generally, it’s not considered sensible to tell you how much we doctors drink, how inexperienced we are or how physically attractive or repugnant we find you. And especially not what your front bottom looks like after childbirth.

When I first walked onto an NHS ward in 1984, many patients were not even told if they had a serious diagnosis such as cancer, multiple sclerosis or dementia. We assumed you weren’t able to contribute, didn’t want to know or that telling you might just make you more anxious and unable to cope. And doctors didn’t have to waste emotion and energy on those difficult conversations about death and disability. But not knowing your diagnosis meant that you couldn’t possibly participate in important decisions about your care, involve your loved ones or plan properly for the future. We pretended to do the worrying for you, and left you to figure it out for yourself.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/active/mens-health/11316370/Why-your-doctor-doesnt-always-tell-you-the-truth.html

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We assume you don’t want the whole truth because it isn’t compatible with trust’ Photo: Alamy

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, Uncategorized,

How GPs leave us feeling confused: Third admit feeling anxious after an appointment because they do not understand what their doctor has told them

One in three Brits admit leaving appointments with their GP completely baffled by medical jargon, according to research.
A shocking 31 per cent feel confused, anxious and uneasy after failing to understand what their doctor has told them.
One in ten 18 to 24 year olds (ten per cent) even think a harmless ‘benign’ condition is terminal – causing them to leave the doctor’s in unnecessary fear.
The study shows many others are also misunderstanding their diagnosis.
One in nine Brits (11 per cent) believe a CT scan is a ‘computerised torso scan’, while eight per cent are convinced a haemorrhage is just another word for piles.

Click on the link to read more
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2718538/How-GPs-leave-feeling-confused-Third-admit-feeling-anxious-appointment-understand-doctor-told-them.html

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Filed under: GP's, Uncategorized, ,

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