STRENGTH IN NUMBERS

Strength in Numbers dedicated to my late mother Kay

Mum slams NHS for ‘shocking failures’ over death of meningitis baby Leo Radcliffe

How many more will suffer before their life has already started, Joanna

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A mother has slammed the NHS for ‘shocking failures’ over the death of her baby, including an NHS Direct call-handler who classed the emergency as non-urgent because the desperate parent failed to use the word ‘severe’.

Katie Corry, 22, held up her feverish baby Leo to the phone so the call handler could hear his ‘rapid’ breathing. An inquest heard the call was classified as non-urgent because Katie had not used the word ‘severe’ which would have prompted a speedier response in accordance with the script of questions and potential answers the call handler was using at the time.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/leo-radcliffe-meningitis-mum-nhs-8910030

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Baby Leo Radcliffe

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, , ,

Cancer survival rates 10 years behind Europe: British figures still well below other countries despite billions being spent to improve situation over the last 15 years

Cancer survival rates in Britain lag more than ten years behind those in many other European countries, experts warn. Even for breast cancer – one of the most treatable forms of the disease – the figures are still well below those reached by France, Sweden and Italy in the late 1990s. For lung cancer, the rates are so far behind that patients in Britain are now half as likely to survive as those living in Austria.  Macmillan Cancer Support has described the situation as ‘shameful’ and warns too many patients are dying needlessly here when they would survive had they been treated elsewhere in Europe. And despite billions being spent to improve cancer survival rates over the last 15 years – £640million invested by Labour in the early 2000s and £750million by the Tories – Britain does not appear to have gained any ground.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3008614/Cancer-survival-rates-10-years-Europe-British-figures-countries-despite-billions-spent-improve-situation-15-years.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

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Filed under: Cancer, Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, ,

War hero who survived Dunkirk blames NHS for alleged blunders which resulted in him losing both his legs

A war hero who served in the Second World War and survived Dunkirk has lost both his legs after alleged hospital blunders by the NHS.

Douglas Mainwaring, 93, from Bridgend, first visited his GP complaining of a pain in his left foot in September 2008 and was told it had likely been caused by a verruca. It was treated with a special freezing spray but after the treatment his leg became gangrenous and had to be amputated in October 2012.  His family claim investigations later revealed the original problemwas not a verruca at all, but was caused by a bone left sticking out after Douglas broke his foot during the war. His daughter Yvonne, 62, explained: “The GP sprayed quite a large area of dad’s foot.

“Less than a month later we noticed his foot turning black. We took him to hospital and the first thing the surgeon asked was, ‘When did you have frostbite?’ “After that things just got worse and worse. He was in terrible pain.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/war-hero-who-survived-dunkirk-8894134

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Douglas Mainwaring with daughter Yvonne and wife, Jean

Filed under: Elderly, Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders,

Brain tumour boy Ashya King is free of cancer, parents say

Wonderful news. My highest admiration goes out to Ashya’s parents that had the faith and courage to defy doctors here in the UK. Joanna

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The parents of five-year-old Ashya King, who were jailed after taking him abroad for brain tumour treatment, say their son is now free of cancer

Ashya King is free of cancer after he was given treatment not available for him on the NHS, his parents have claimed. The five-year-old’s family have told of his “miracle” recovery, as the centre where he was treated declared him cancer-free, The Sun reported. Ashya’s mother Naghmeh, who alongside her husband Brett sparked an international manhunt last summer by removing the little boy from hospital in Southampton without medical consent, described the news as incredible.

“If we had left Ashya with the NHS in Britain, he would not be with us today. He was too weak and would not have survived,” she told the paper. Ashya was finally allowed to undergo treatment at the Proton Therapy Centre (PTC) in Prague for brain cancer after a long legal battle fought by his parents.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/children/11489212/Brain-tumour-boy-Ashya-King-is-free-of-cancer-parents-say.html

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Ashya King with his mother Naghmeh in October 2014 after his proton therapy treatment

Filed under: Cancer, Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , , ,

The biggest disaster in the NHS’s history: 2,000 died after 34,000 were given HIV or hepatitis C through infected blood…but it took 30 years for an apology

7,500 people, many haemophiliacs, given contaminated blood

  • Diseases came from high risk donors including prostitutes and prisoners 
  • Many victims needed liver transplants and dialysis
  • People inadvertently infected partners and children with diseases 
  • Follows publication of 1,800-page, six-year report into scandal  

The Government will apologise this week for what has been called the worst treatment disaster in the history of the National Health Service – the infection of thousands of patients with deadly diseases through use of contaminated blood products.

Following the personal intervention of David Cameron, there will be a formal statement of regret given to the House of Commons, similar to those acknowledging the official failures of Bloody Sunday and the Hillsborough football disaster. This will come after the publication on Wednesday of the 1,800-page Penrose Inquiry, a six-year report into a scandal that has led to more than 2,000 British deaths. About 7,500 people, many of them haemophiliacs, are known to have contracted HIV and hepatitis C after being given imported blood products taken from high-risk donors such as prostitutes and prisoners in the 1970s and 1980s.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3006062/The-biggest-disaster-NHS-s-history-2-000-died-34-000-given-HIV-hepatitis-C-infected-blood-took-30-years-apology.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

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Long fight: Members of the Haemophilia Society delegation delivered a petition to David Cameron, along with lilies to represent people that have died as a result of being given infected blood

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Is the NHS getting safer? This is one of a series of overviews, looking at key areas of quality: safety, waiting times, mental health, person-centred care and international comparisons. The Health Foundation, Authors John Illingworth

This overview considers how the NHS has performed over the current parliament in relation to patient safety. We look at data relating to reported incidents and harm, episodes of care free of certain types of harm, and patient and staff perceptions of safety.

  •  Harm caused by health care affects every health system in the world; the NHS is no exception. Research from the UK suggests that around 8-12% of admissions to hospitals will involve an adverse event, resulting in harm to the patient. Between half and one third of these adverse events are thought to be preventable. Similar figures are reported in international studies.
  • The NHS has made great progress in tackling some specific causes of harm in hospitals. The number of people developing infections such as MRSA as a result of their care has remained low during this parliament. The proportion of patients receiving care that is free of four common adverse events, including pressure ulcers, has increased from 91% in July 2012 to 94% in February 2015.
  • Staff reporting of hospital safety incidents continues to improve. There has been a sustained increase in the reporting of incidents during this parliament, while the percentage of staff saying they have witnessed an incident has remained roughly the same. This suggests that the proportion of hospital incidents going unreported has declined.
  • Some warning signs are emerging among the NHS workforce. During this parliament, the percentage of staff who say there is a blame culture in their organisation has risen, as has the percentage of staff who have reported feeling unwell because of work-related stress. Around 40% of patients feel there aren’t always enough nurses on duty to care for them.
  • We don’t know how safe health care services are outside of hospital. There is little published evidence from which to draw conclusions about levels of harm in primary and community care. Less than 1% of all reported incidents are in primary care, despite 90% of all patient contact taking place there, suggesting significant underreporting of harm in this care setting.

Click the PDF below to download the overview 

Swimming Against The Tide Briefing The Health Foundation

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http://www.health.org.uk/publications/is-the-nhs-getting-safer/

 

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , , , ,

Exclusive: Nurses demand more purchase power over products. By Steve Ford, Nursing Times

The joint survey of over 850 nurses by Nursing Times, NHS Supply Chain and the Royal College of Nursing will inform a major new campaign to boost the influence of nursing staff in the NHS procurement process.

A resounding 90% of survey respondents thought senior nurses should have greater influence over what products were used to support patient care. A similar percentage said they believed nurses could save money if they had greater involvement in the purchasing process and 87% thought patient safety would be improved through close working between nursing staff and clinical supplies teams. More than half, 55%, said they had already seen areas where savings could be made by changing the clinical products they used, for example through standardisation or reducing waste.

Click on the link to read more

Exclusive Nurses demand more purchase power over products

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District community elderly blood home patient dressing wound care

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, , , ,

MAJOR INCIDENT DECLARED AT CUMBRIAN HOSPITALS

The trust in charge of the Cumberland Infirmary in Carlisle and the West Cumberland Hospital in Whitehaven has declared a major incident.

The News & Star has learned that staff were called to a meeting at 3pm yesterday. There they were told that the hospital is now at “escalation number five”, which is an internal major incident. A spokeswoman for North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust told the News & Star that the declaration is across the trust, but the Carlisle hospital is more acutely affected. We understand that the hospital simply ran out of beds yesterday afternoon, and had no option but to declare an emergency and call for help from its partner agencies.

NHS England has said it will not be commenting.

A full statement from the trust and NHS Cumbria Clinical Commissioning Group is expected later.

  • Have you been affected? Call 01228 612653 or email emily.parsons@cnmedia.co.uk

http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/major-incident-declared-at-cumbrian-hospitals-1.1199999

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Filed under: A&E, Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, ,

Unfilled posts threaten patient care

A shortage of junior doctors and consultants at an ‘inadequate’ mental health trust must be tackled urgently, says the BMA.  Unsafe staffing levels were first revealed at NSFT (Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust) in a damning report by the health regulator, the CQC (Care Quality Commission), published last month. At that time, the trust said vacancy rates in clinical services were below 10 per cent.

However, a BMA freedom of information request to the trust has revealed the medical vacancy rate, as of February, stands at 14.4 per cent — equating to a shortage of more than 31 doctors. BMA Eastern regional consultant committee chair Rob Harwood said the findings highlighted the need for proper investment in health services and needed to be addressed ‘urgently’. Dr Harwood said: ‘We perhaps ought not to be surprised that a trust recently placed in special measures by the CQC needs more doctors, based on its own figures. ‘Mental health services need appropriate resources to allow them to care properly for their patients.’

Click on the link to read more

http://bma.org.uk/news-views-analysis/news/2015/march/unfilled-posts-threaten-patient-care?

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , ,

Health regulator has failed and is not fit for purpose, says CQC chairman

The regulator, which is responsible for ensuring high standards of care are upheld across the country’s hospitals, GP surgeries and care homes, has been accused of not acting quickly enough or thoroughly investigating scandals relating to Mid Stafford Hospital and Winterbourne View care home. The British Medical Association added that it had “no confidence” in the regulator last June after allegations of a cover-up over inspections at a children’s hospital in Cumbria.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.edp24.co.uk/news/health_regulator_has_failed_and_is_not_fit_for_purpose_says_cqc_chairman_1_3339205

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David Prio, former chairman at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital.

Filed under: Care Homes, GP's, Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , ,

Barts NHS Trust in special measures after deaths of newborn and mother (Whipps Cross Hospital)

The country’s biggest NHS Trust has been placed in special measures, in the wake of a damning inspection report that catalogued unsafe care caused by staff shortages and a bullying culture at one of its main hospitals.

Whipps Cross Hospital, part of the Barts Health NHS Trust, was branded inadequate by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) in a report which uncovered 208 serious incidents last year alone – including the deaths of two unborn babies, a new mother and a newborn baby. The Trust, which serves 2.5 million in east London and Essex, has been plagued by financial problems since it was formed by the merger of three London Trusts in 2012. It is also projecting a deficit of £93m this year. Two years ago, managers decided to cut hundreds of nursing posts to help balance the books, after a slowdown in national NHS funding combined with crippling repayments on a Private Finance Initiative (PFI) deal forced the Trust into the red. In total, 220 nursing posts were lost at Whipps Cross, and hundreds of other  staff had their pay and responsibilities downgraded.

As a result, inspectors said yesterday, the hospital did not have enough staff to ensure safe care.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/barts-nhs-trust-in-special-measures-after-deaths-of-newborn-and-mother-10114675.html

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, Uncategorized, , , ,

They’re trying to kill me’ – Great Yarmouth great-grandfather before his hospital death

A Norfolk widow has revealed her final conversation with her husband just hours before NHS staff followed a ‘do not resuscitate’ notice without consent.

Former metal polisher and gardener Michael Richardson, 66, of Bath Hill Terrace, Great Yarmouth, died at James Paget University Hospital (JPH) in Gorleston on October 27 2013. His widow Janet, 66, has accused medics of playing God with his life after discovering that a do not resuscitate (DNR) notice had been placed on him without consent by the family or Mr Richardson. He had been ill for several years with a lung condition which caused his breathing to stop but had been given more than a year to live.

Click on the link to more

http://www.greatyarmouthmercury.co.uk/news/they_re_trying_to_kill_me_great_yarmouth_great_grandfather_before_his_hospital_death_1_3996515

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Michael Richardson died at James Paget University Hospital in Gorleston in October 2013.

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, , ,

The biggest privatisation in NHS history: why we had to blow the whistle by Kate Godfrey

I’m not a journalist, but as of this morning I know what it feels like to be part of the biggest leak in NHS history.

Published on openDemocracy, the memorandum of information for the £700m sell-off of Staffordshire cancer services is now available for the 800,000 directly affected and 3 million indirectly affected patients to read online.

That document, together with others relating to the joint £1.2bn privatisation of cancer and end-of-life services in Staffordshire, was sent to me. They are commercially confidential, secret agreements that will rebuild NHS services for hundreds of thousands of people, but are for the eyes of the bidding companies only. Not only is this the first billion-pound NHS privatisation, it is the first time that it has been deemed acceptable to put care designed to meet the needs of our most vulnerable patients on sale.

Uniquely for a privatisation on anything of this scale, there has been no public consultation, simply a series of weak “engagement” events led by paid “patient champions”. For the past year unpaid patients have not been able to have their say. Thanks to the brave person who shared the documents, now they can.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/mar/16/nhs-privatisation-biggest-history-staffordshire-cancer

'Staffordshire commissioners want to hand all management and care of cancer and end-of-life patients to a private company.'

‘Staffordshire commissioners want to hand all management and care of cancer and end-of-life patients to a private company.’ Photograph: Alamy

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, Whistleblowing, , , ,

MPs call for better training to improve nurses’ end of life care skills, By Nicola Merrifield, Nursing Times

Nurses and other clinicians must receive tailored training to address the lack of confidence and skills they have in raising end of life issues with patients, a report by the Commons’ health select committee has said.

The MPs’ inquiry into end of life care found variation in the quality and practice of care given to people approaching the end of life – defined by the committee as those who appear likely to die within the next 12 months – within both hospital and community settings.

End of life care is unlikely to improve unless staff feel able to identify people who are close to dying and start conversations with them about where and how they would like to be cared for, said the MPs in their report. http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/health-committee/news/report-end-of-life-care/

Evidence submitted to the committee by the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman stated that half of all its complaints around this type of care featured poor communication – including between clinicians and patients or the family, within clinical teams and between hospitals and community services.

Click on the link to read more

MPs call for better training to improve nurses’ end of life care skills

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Filed under: Elderly, Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , ,

NHS in crisis: Gok Wan’s auntie suffers agonising 7-hour wait on Scots hospital A&E trolley

GOK Wan’s family have told of their fury after the TV star’s frail aunt lay in agony on a trolley at a Scots hospital for seven hours.

Mary Wan, 81, was taken to Glasgow Royal Infirmary after complaining of excruciating leg pains at her nursing home in the city. But relatives were horrified when she was left until early in the morning with no food or medication, despite suffering a stroke just weeks before. Gok’s cousin Charles, 51, who is Mary’s son, said: “My mum is an elderly Chinese woman who doesn’t speak any English. I have to speak up for her.

“For someone of her age to suffer in pain for that time is not on. She is the best mum in the world and deserves to be looked after properly.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/health/nhs-crisis-gok-wans-auntie-5341832

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Gok with cousin Charlie, and his aunt Mary

Filed under: A&E, Hospital, NHS, , ,

Fears over death wish databases that doctors say mean elderly could be left to die at home rather than saved at hospital

Do you think it’s a good idea to construct computer databases containing the details of how elderly people want to die in hospital or at home? 

Please fill in our one question survey

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/dying

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A ‘worrying’ scheme to construct a series of computer databases containing the details of how every elderly person wants to die is being recommended by MPs.

They are pressing Ministers to push ahead with a universal system for recording people’s death wishes – despite fears people could be denied life-saving hospital treatment. Doctors or nurses would ask elderly patients where they want to die and whether they would prefer treatment to be withheld if all appears lost. Their wishes would then be added to databases to be shared with GPs, hospital staff and ambulance crews.  The Health Select Committee wants to reduce the number of dying patients being ferried to hospital for ‘unnecessary’ reasons. While around seven in 10 people say they want to die in their own homes, only two in 10 actually do. Too often, according to a report from the committee today, doctors carry information about where and how their patients want to die ‘in their heads’. Under the new system, if a patient has indicated they want to die at home, this information will be passed to paramedics called to an emergency.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2995242/Fears-death-wish-databases-doctors-say-mean-elderly-left-die-home-saved-hospital.html

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Filed under: Elderly, GP's, Hospital, NHS, , , ,

GP’s told to let older doctors go home early – to prevent mistakes

Do you think older doctors should be allowed to go home at 4pm, or should they retire? Please fill in our one question survey

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/Older-Doctors

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Older doctors should be allowed to go home at 4pm to stop errors occurring, according to new guidance. NHS England says flexible working patterns should be brought in to help older GPs who find their “concentration goes” after 4pm. The advice was given by Kate Staveley, assistant performance director at NHS England’s Bristol, North Somerset, Somerset and South Gloucester area team. Writing in the March newsletter of Devon’s Local Medical Committee, she said: “We are all working harder than we ever have before and if we want to thrive and survive it is essential that we look after ourselves and each other.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/gps-told-older-doctors-go-5

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Tired: Doctors would benefit from more flexible hours

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, , , ,

Scandal of patients dying… just from a cracked rib: NHS ‘failing to use new technique that can stop pneumonia kicking in’

The lives of elderly patients with broken ribs are being put at risk because emergency departments and GPs are failing to refer them for up-to-date assessment and treatment.

Breathing difficulties caused by these injuries can lead to the lung infection pneumonia, which is especially dangerous for older people. A revolutionary two-hour procedure that involves implanting flexible titanium splints to support the fractures while they heal was approved for NHS use in 2010, and has been shown to slash lung infection rates. But according to DePuy Synthes, which manufactures the unique Matrix Rib Fixation System, the implants have been used only in a total of 350 cases – although the Health & Social Care Information Centre say there were 29,401 hospital consultations involving rib fractures last year alone.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2994859/Scandal-patients-dying-just-cracked-rib-NHS-failing-use-new-technique-stop-pneumonia-kicking-in.html

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A revolutionary two-hour procedure that involves implanting flexible titanium splints to support the fractures while they heal was approved for NHS use in 2010, pictured is how the operation works

Filed under: Elderly, GP's, Hospital, NHS, , , , ,

NHS scheme ‘like a police line-up’

A hospital has been criticised after patients were forced to parade their conditions on laminated signs, under a new scheme likened to “a police line-up”. Broomfield Hospital in Chelmsford, Essex, has introduced a trial which sees Accident & Emergency patients given cards detailing their medical condition. Hospital managers say the initiative – which labels patients according to their level of urgency – is designed to help speed up waiting times. All patients are given a green or red laminated cards detailing their condition – meaning those with alcohol problems, mental health issues and gynaecological problems – could lose patient confidentiality.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/11470242/NHS-scheme-like-a-police-line-up.html

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Broomfield Hospital in Chelmsford Photo: Eastnews Press Agency

Filed under: A&E, Hospital, NHS, , ,

NHS sell-out: Tories sign largest privatisation deal in history worth £780MILLION

The sales to a total of 11 private firms, some with dubious records, are intended to help hospitals tackle the backlog of patients waiting for surgery and tests.

Jeremy Hunt’s claims that the NHS is not for sale lay in tatters last night after he signed the largest privatisation deal in history. The Health Secretary, who has repeatedly denied health services are being siphoned off to private firms under this Government, faced furious reactions as the £780 million deal was revealed.

The sales to a total of 11 private firms, some with dubious records, are intended to help hospitals tackle the backlog of patients waiting for surgery and tests. Heart, joint and a variety of operations will be carried out, as well as scans, X-rays and other diagnostic tests. Under the deal struck by the NHS Supply Chain, many services will be provided in mobile units, rather than hospitals.

The news was met by anger, not least because three of the 11 profit-driven firms have previously been slammed for providing poor quality of care.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/nhs-sell-out-tories-sign-largest-5323402

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , ,

‘Well-loved’ Bexleyheath mother and grand-mother died after ‘huge errors’ were made by staff at Darent Valley Hospital

The article makes me go cold, as my mother also went into hospital for a hip problem and later died. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1394300/NHS-hip-operation-mother-died-Daughters-harrowing-account.html

My thoughts and prayers to the family of Koshalaya Sawhney, Joanna

An elderly woman, who was admitted to hospital with a hip problem, died after “huge errors” were made by staff, an inquest has heard.  “Well loved” mother and grand-mother Koshalaya Sawhney died on January 18 last year at Darent Valley Hospital after suffering a “massive” stroke and falling into a coma. Mrs Sawhney, 85, of Bowness Road, Bexleyheath, had been taken to A and E on January 7 with a locked hip that left her unable to move. Her daughter, Viniti Seabrooke, told North West Kent Coroners’ Court, prior to going to hospital, her mother did not have any major health problems.

Mrs Seabrooke, who is a medical researcher, said: “My mum was extremely proud and self-sufficient.  “She lived on her own and did not have any help with personal care.  “She had some health issues but they were not unmanageable and not life-threatening.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.newsshopper.co.uk/news/11845781._Well_loved__Bexleyheath_mother_and_grand_mother_died_after__huge_errors__were_made_by_staff_at_Darent_Valley_Hospital/

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Filed under: A&E, Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, , ,

First patients diagnosed through genome sequencing, the milestones announced today

Patients in the NHS are now receiving personalised care based on their DNA code. Two families have been diagnosed with rare conditions as part of a project at Newcastle Hospitals and University that used an analysis of their genomes – the complete set of people’s genes – to properly understand the health issues they are experiencing. They will now receive effective, personalised treatment, as well as helping prevent future generations who share their DNA from suffering a life of uncertainty about similar symptoms.

One hundred thousand genomes will be sequenced across the country, making the UK the world-leader in collecting and decoding human genomes to help scientists and doctors understand rare disease and design personalised treatments.

Click on the link to read more, and how this will help

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/first-patients-diagnosed-through-genome-sequencing?

 

 

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , ,

Harry Procko Exclusive: ‘Doctors got it wrong’, says Medical Director by Daniel Robbins – Notts TV News

The Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust’s medical director has admitted that ‘doctors got it wrong’ over the treatment of Harry Procko.

Dr Stephen Fowlie is heard in the recording below talking about the treatment of four-year-old Harry, who is autistic, who died after being taken to the Queens Medical Centre last June. He was initially taken to the hospital with vomiting and diarrhoea and the hospital said he needed some tests. But after nine hours of waiting in unfamiliar surroundings, Harry became very distressed and his parents made the decision to take him home for the evening. The next day when he was taken back, doctors planned for a blood test to be taken and fluids to be given for dehydration but that never happened and two days after he was discharged, Harry collapsed, turned blue and died a short time later.

Here is what Dr Fowlie is heard saying when asked about the chain of events:

Click on the link to hear the audio correspondence and read the article

http://news.nottstv.com/harry-procko-exclusive-doctors-got-it-wrong-says-medical-director/

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, ,

Elderly patients will get consultations with doctors via webcams to reduce pressure on A&E as part of £200 million NHS shake-up

The elderly will undergo consultations via webcams and patients will be offered GP appointments at weekends as part of an NHS shake-up. Simon Stevens, the health service’s chief executive, today announced a £200 million scheme aimed at providing better care for the most vulnerable patients so they don’t end up in hospital. Initially, it involves 29 local projects covering a total of five million patients which will all operate slightly differently depending on the needs of the population. But the hope is to gradually expand these nationwide with the overall aim of treating more patients at home – or at their GP – rather than in hospital. Mr Stevens said the problem with the set-up of the NHS at the moment is that it is too ‘fragmented’, meaning patients are passed ‘from pillar to post’ between the various hospital wards, outpatient clinic and their GP.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2988408/Elderly-patients-consultations-doctors-webcams-reduce-pressure-E-200-million-NHS-shake-up.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

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Filed under: Elderly, GP's, Hospital, NHS, , , ,

Government accused of breaking promises on NHS cancer treatment

Ministers have been accused of failing cancer patients after it emerged that three key improvements to services pledged by the coalition have been delayed.

The hold-ups, involving key aspects of the government’s 2011 cancer strategy, have prompted concern that the growing number of people developing the disease will not get the best treatment possible. The coalition has not delivered on its promise made to provide the NHS in England with 12 extra machines, called linear accelerators or linacs, which give patients high doses of radiotherapy. Jane Ellison, the public health minister, said in December that the NHS had 265 such machines in 2011-12 but just four more than that – 269 – in 2013-14, with just 256 “in full clinical use”.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/mar/09/government-accused-breaking-promises-nhs-cancer-treatment

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Filed under: Cancer, Hospital, NHS, , ,

More than 100,000 patients injured or killed by medical ‘blunders’ in the Welsh NHS since 2010, shock figures reveal

More than 100,000 patients have been injured or killed by medical “blunders” in the Welsh NHS since 2010, new figures have revealed.

Documents released under the Freedom of Information Act show that patients were injured on at least 102,807 separate occasions at Welsh hospitals, and an astonishing 1,742 of those led to major harm – or even death. On average, one Welsh NHS patient was harmed every 30 minutes as a result of doctors or nurses misusing drugs or equipment, making mistakes over paperwork or providing negligent treatment.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/more-100000-patients-injured-killed-8796747

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Filed under: A&E, Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, , , ,

The best thing about being a doctor is sharing the secrets of the NHS system – by Ellie May, consultant anaesthetist

I see where the health service fails patients and I want to apologise for it

There are so many excellent aspects of being a doctor you may think it difficult to pick the best one. The good news is I have the answer. The bad news is, it’s not what you think.

First, eliminate the sensible reasons for embarking upon a vocation in medicine, the benefits that parents point out: a job for life, employee benefits such as sick pay and maternity leave, and a public sector pension. Next, disregard obvious reasons, stated by eager applicants during their interview for medical school. Helping people, making a difference and job satisfaction. Leaving aside the irreverent: nudity, black humour and in-jokes are the domain of sniggering, usually male junior doctors. It can be amusing but is far from the best thing.

No, the best thing about being a doctor in the NHS today is having insider knowledge. Knowing the weak points in the system. Being able to identify where systems break down and having the know how, ability and confidence to intervene. Being able to remedy problems in a timely manner, averting disaster or just gently steering the plan back on course is something I am eternally grateful I can do. Not just for me but also for my friends and family.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/healthcare-network/views-from-the-nhs-frontline/2015/mar/09/nhs-fails-patients-doctor-apologise?

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I know how best to access a busy consultant and how to push the receptionist at the GP surgery for an appointment. Photograph: Thomas Tolstrup/Getty Images

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, , ,

Paramedic reveals stress and depression among workers – ITV News

A paramedic has spoken out about high levels of stress and depression among frontline ambulance workers, saying there was “no respite” from pressures on the service. It comes as figures reveal the number of ‘stress-related’ sick days taken by people working in emergency healthcare – including paramedics and technicians – has rocketed by 40 per cent in just 12 months.

Stuart Gray, who works in London, said the stress of the job had caused him to be off ill on “several occasions”.

We are continually hammered from the moment we sign on duty until we make our weak attempts to get home on time.

There is virtually no respite now. The biggest stress is being asked to deal with things that are clearly not emergencies.

Everybody and his dog wants, or thinks they need, an ambulance. So we are constantly responding under emergency conditions to those who’ve drunk too much alcohol or who’ve been nursing a cough for two weeks.

My colleagues are tired and depressed. They are leaving the profession, or going to places where there is still hope for pre-hospital care.

– STUART GRAY, PARAMEDIC

5 News exclusive – Strain on frontline ambulance staff causes major rise in stress-related illnesses

Paramedics and ambulance technicians took 40% more days off for stress-related illnesses in 2014

Click on the link to read more

http://www.channel5.com/shows/5-news/features-archived/5-news-exclusive-strain-on-frontline-ambulance-staff-causes-major-rise-in-stress-related-illnesses

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Filed under: A&E, Hospital, NHS, ,

Hospital crisis hit 900 operations in West of England. Nearly half of those – 436 at Gloucestershire’s two main hospitals

More than 900 patients in the West of England had surgery cancelled for non-medical reasons at the start of 2015.

Nearly half of those – 436 – were due to be seen at Gloucestershire’s two main hospitals during a fortnight of intense pressure on the NHS. “Major incidents” were declared at a number of UK hospitals as medical staff struggled to cope with patient numbers. The Great Western Hospital in Swindon had the next highest total with 141 elective operations cancelled. Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Trust – which released its figures following a Freedom of Information request – said the pressure was due to high demand on it’s services, an increase in frail and elderly patients and a shortage of beds. A statement from the trust said that operations called off on the day – a “national standard” for measuring cancellations – brought the number down to 43. The figure of 436 includes operations cancelled before and on the day for “non-medical” reasons. The trust said the data was “complex” and “should be considered in that context.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-31728432

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , ,

The longest wait: The parents that have to live without their children

Ink barely dry on but I can’t help thinking of other families seeking truth like that of baby Lizzie Dixon. Tweeted by ShaunLintern

 No parent should ever go though & see the life taken away from their children that should have lived a normal and happy life, Joanna

Please click on the link, a story about Lizzie Dixon that I published 17th September 2014

https://joanna678s.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/private-eye.pdf

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Lizzie Dixon.

 

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, Uncategorized,

City lawyer sues London hospital for £1.5m after appendix blunder left her infertile

A leading City lawyer whose hopes of motherhood were devastated after doctors failed to notice that she needed emergency surgery to remove her appendix is suing the hospital for £1.5 million in damages. But the NHS Trust’s lawyers say she deserves only £300,000 because if she had had children they would have hampered her high-flying career. Sarah Marquis was “rendered infertile” when her appendix burst. Medics at Homerton Hospital failed to spot in time that it needed emergency removal, the High Court heard.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/health/city-lawyer-sues-hospital-for-15m-after-appendix-blunder-left-her-infertile-10088211.html

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Compensation bid: Sarah Marquis outside the High Court (Picture: Richard Gittins/Champion News)

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders,

Dad dies of heart attack hours after bungling paramedics refuse to take him to A&E – dismissing it as a PANIC ATTACK

A coroner has blasted bungling paramedics who dismissed a dad’s agonising chest pains as a PANIC ATTACK – just hours before he died of cardiac arrest.

Tragic Jeffrey Corbin, 59, was even persuaded not to go to hospital by an ambulance crew who told him he would have to wait up to SEVEN HOURS in A&E for treatment. Shockingly, when he collapsed in his bedroom 24 hours later on April 20 last year it took 75 minutes for a first responder to turn up after he was categorised as a low priority. National government targets require an ambulance to attend an address within 30 minutes of a 999 call. But because of extra demand over the Easter weekend it took a further 14 minutes before an ambulance finally arrived at his home in Sneyd Green, Stoke-on-Trent. When the retired factory worker was finally taken to hospital it was too late and the father-of-three was pronounced dead.

Click on the link to read more

http://swns.com/news/dad-dies-of-heart-attack-hours-after-bungling-paramedics-refuse-to-take-him-to-ae-dismissing-it-as-a-panic-attack-65044/

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Jeffrey Corbin. The grieving family of a heart attack victim, who died 24 hours after paramedics failed to take him to hospital, are taking legal action against the NHS (© Newsteam / SWNS Group)

Filed under: A&E, Elderly, Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, , ,

Is another NHS scandal brewing?

Do you think there is another NHS scandal brewing? Please fill in our one question survey

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NHS-scandal

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Lethal. Shocking. Unacceptable. Dysfunctional. Failures at every level. So said the report into maternity care at Cumbria’s Furness General Hospital.

But as was pointed out repeatedly as the inquiry published its findings on Tuesday, the parallels with Stafford Hospital are chillingly similar. In fact, Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt went as far as calling it a “second” Stafford Hospital – albeit it on a smaller scale.

In both cases poor care was covered up by a culture of secrecy and intimidation, priorities seemed to have been distorted by the pursuit of foundation trust status and the wider NHS missed opportunities to deal with the problems at an earlier stage.

In both cases it led to unnecessary suffering – and it was left to patients to expose the truth. So can we be sure this is not happening elsewhere? It’s a question that always gets asked when these reports are published – and the sad truth is that there can be no guarantees.

Dr Bill Kirkup, the chair of the Morecambe Bay Inquiry, named after the trust which ran the hospital, admitted as such. He said “there could be elements” of what he found happening elsewhere when pressed by journalists.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-31728724

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, Whistleblowing, , ,

Shocking NHS op blunders that should NEVER happen revealed by Daily Mirror

A patient died after being given the wrong type of blood and another had a testicle removed unnecessarily – just two of the shocking NHS blunders uncovered by the Daily Mirror.

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has said six mistakes like these are happening in hospitals every week. They are called “never events” – because they are so bad they should never happen. And our probe under the Freedom of Information Act exposes some of the shocking details for the first time. In one case a patient was told they had cancer and had part of their nose chopped off by mistake, while a second was wrongly told they didn’t have cancer.

Katherine Murphy, chief executive of the Patients Association, said: “As suggested by the name, these sorts of events are utterly unacceptable and pose a huge risk to patient safety and well-being. “While we accept accidents will sometimes occur, it is vital that lessons are learnt each time to ensure they aren’t repeated. “This is yet another reminder of the need to properly fund the regulation of healthcare to ensure that it detects patterns of errors such as these, and acts to ensure that no more patients are put at risk.”

Roger Goss, director of Patient Concern, said: “If the concept is to achieve a reduction in harm to patients, staff responsible for these never events should be fired. That is what would happen in the private sector. Unfortunately, getting rid of anyone from the NHS, however careless or incompetent, is virtually impossible.”

WRONG NOSE: WRONG BLOOD: WRONG BIOPSY:

WRONG TESTICLE:

Click on the link to read these shocking hospital blunders

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/shocking-nhs-op-blunders-should-5276548?

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, , ,

Ex-NHS boss Farrar avoids Morecambe Bay question

Former NHS Confederation Chief Executive Mike Farrar is confronted by Channel 4 News over a “dysfunctional” maternity unit, which led to the unnecessary deaths of 11 babies and one mother.

Click on the link to watch and read

http://www.channel4.com/news/morecambe-bay-nhs-baby-deaths-mike-farrar-doorstep-video

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, Uncategorized, ,

Morecambe Bay Investigation Report published

My heart and prayers go out to the parents and families of all the babies and the mother that died unnecessary due to the shocking errors made. Joanna

Independent investigation into maternity and neonatal services in Morecambe Bay makes far-reaching recommendations to prevent future unnecessary deaths.

The report makes 44 recommendations for the Trust and wider NHS, aimed at ensuring the failings are properly recognised and acted upon.

Announcing the report’s findings, Investigation Chairman Dr Bill Kirkup said:

All health care – everywhere – includes the possibility of error. The great majority of NHS staff know this and work hard to avoid it. They should not be blamed or criticised when errors occur despite their efforts.

But in return, all of us who work for the NHS owe the public a duty to be open and honest when things go wrong, most of all to those affected, and to learn from what has happened. This is the contract that was broken in Morecambe Bay.

The investigation report details 20 instances of significant failures of care in the FGH maternity unit which may have contributed to the deaths of 3 mothers and 16 babies. Different clinical care in these cases would have been expected to prevent the death of 1 mother and 11 babies. This is almost 4 times the frequency of such occurrences at the Trust’s other main maternity unit, at the Royal Lancaster Infirmary.

The report says the maternity department at FGH was dysfunctional with serious problems in 5 main areas:

Click on the Press Release link to read more 

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/morecambe-bay-investigation-report-published

Click on the link to read the Morecambe Bay Investigation Report

The Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, Uncategorized, Whistleblowing, , ,

Morecambe Bay: Furness hospital inquiry timeline

Here is a timeline of events leading up to the publication of the Morecambe Bay Investigation due out today 3rd March 2015
Click on the link to read

http://www.westernmorningnews.co.uk/Morecambe-Bay-Furness-hospital-inquiry-timeline/story-26109820-detail/story.html

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, Whistleblowing, , ,

Lamb proposes single department for health and social care By David Williams LGC

In a wide ranging pre-election interview with LGC’s sister title Health Service Journal, the Liberal Democrat minister said the government should lead by example by integrating budgets at a national level through the the creation of a “new department for health and care” immediately after the election. This would mean the Department for Communities & Local Government loses responsibility over care funding, which would be handed to a new incarnation of the Department of Health.

“Can anyone argue against it?” Mr Lamb asked. Restating his view that health and social care budgets should be fully merged locally by 2018, Mr Lamb said: “To match that nationally you’ve got to have a department for health and care. “It’s ridiculous that we have funding for the health and care system flowing through two different government departments and endless negotiations between two. It has to be one department.”

Click on the link to read more

Lamb proposes single department for health and social care

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Norman Lamb suggests a ‘new department for health and care’ should be established immediately after the election

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, ,

NHS calls for British doctors working in Australia to come back and help the shortfall in numbers in the UK

The NHS has been forced to ask British doctors in Australia to come home due to a major shortfall in numbers. Around 1,000 more GPs are urgently needed in England, according to new figures released by the House of Commons library.  It is thought that nearly 1,500 doctors – who cost the taxpayer up to £610,000 to train – move to Australia every year.

To bridge the gap they have been offered a place on a ‘fully funded’ programme, which they can choose to be either full or part time, if they return.  An advert was placed in the Australian Doctor and the Medical Observer by NHS England’s Shropshire and Staffordshire area team and Health Education Midlands earlier this month. It said: ‘This scheme will help you rediscover and enhance the skills you need to return, or start to practise in the UK. ‘It’s fully funded, so you will be supported whilst you complete the programme.’

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2974170/NHS-calls-British-doctors-working-Australia-come-help-shortfall-numbers-UK.html

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Filed under: A&E, GP's, Hospital, NHS, , ,

NHS bosses to be criticised in Morecambe Bay mother and baby deaths report

Health watchdogs set up to protect NHS patients when things go wrong face damning criticism in a report into the scandal of dozens of mothers and babies who died at a hospital following a catalogue of poor care. As many as 30 mothers and babies died at University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust as a result of substandard care made worse by professional rivalries, the independent inquiry is expected to conclude this week. Six midwives face disciplinary hearings in front of the Nursing and Midwifery Council later this year, but to date no nurses, midwives or doctors have been permanently struck off. The investigation has heard how midwives neglected to alert doctors about patient complications in time because of a ‘turf war’ between the two professions. Midwives appeared not to have been on speaking terms with doctors, and claimed they were made to feel irrelevant when doctors were called in to help with difficult cases.

But the report, commissioned by Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary, is also expected to criticise the Care Quality Commission, along with the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman.

Click on link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/11442029/NHS-bosses-to-be-criticised-in-Morecambe-Bay-mother-and-baby-deaths-report.html

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Joshua Titcombe was one of the babies who died at Furness general Hospital 

A baby died an avoidable death’: one family’s fight for justice. 

http://blogs.channel4.com/victoria-macdonald-on-health-and-social-c‘A baby died an avoidable death’: one family’s fight for justiceare/a-baby-died-avoidable-death-familys-fight-justice-daughters-death/2847?

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, Whistleblowing, , , ,

‘Appalling’ treatment of NHS whistleblowers must be investigated: Staff ostracised by hospital bosses demand independent inquiry after ‘whitewash’ Francis Report

NHS whistleblowers are demanding an independent inquiry into their treatment by hospital managers after a long-awaited report was declared a ‘whitewash’. In a scathing letter to the report’s author, they accused him of failing to hold any managers to account and leaving patients at risk of serious harm. The NHS’s ‘Freedom to Speak up Review’, which was published a fortnight ago, told how whistleblowers have faced a culture of ‘fear, bullying and ostracisation’ for daring to speak out. But whistleblowers whose careers have been ruined said still no action has been taken to address the concerns about patient safety that they have been making for years. Despite hearing awful reports about failures and cover ups over patients’ deaths, the report’s author Sir Robert Francis has ‘ignored’ their stories, they said.

NHS whistleblowers, however, have since confronted him, outlining their ‘serious concerns’ that his report has failed to address any of the specific concerns made by NHS staff about the alarming treatment of patients.

The letter has been signed by three high profile whistleblowers, including Dr David Drew, a top paediatrician who was sacked after claiming he had witnessed a cover up over a child’s death. It has also been signed by Sharmila Chowdhury, a senior radiography manager who spoke out about a £250,000 fraud at her Trust, and a third colleague who asked not to be named. Dated February 23, 2015, the letter states: ‘We have now had an opportunity to digest your report and have a number of serious concerns.

Click on the link to read the letter in full and more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2971737/Appalling-treatment-NHS-whistleblowers-investigated-Staff-ostracised-hospital-bosses-demand-independent-inquiry-whitewash-Francis-Report.html?offset=0&max=100&jumpTo=comment-78369030#comment-78369030

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NHS whistleblowers Dr David Drew (left) and Sharmila Chowdhury (right) have written to Sir Robert Francis demanding an independent inquiry into their treatment by hospital bosses, after they spoke out to raise concerns over patient safety

 

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, Whistleblowing, , ,

600 patients die of hunger and thirst every year: Hospital staff refuse to help, say families

Almost 600 patients are dying in hospitals each year because of hunger and thirst, figures show. Bereaved relatives have told how their loved ones were ‘forgotten to death’ by staff who refused to help them eat or drink. Figures from the Office for National Statistics reveal that 7,949 deaths have been attributed to hunger and thirst in the past decade.  In recent years, however, numbers have fallen – suggesting the standards of nursing care are showing signs of improvement.

The figures show that in NHS and private hospitals in 2013, dehydration was recorded as an underlying cause of death or a contributory factor in 574 deaths. In 2008 the total was 942. In 2013 a further 336 deaths were logged with malnutrition being an underlying cause or contributory factor. The two figures cannot be added together to give a total because some patients would have been recorded in both categories. Another 88 deaths in care homes in 2013 were attributed to dehydration and 33 to malnutrition, according to the figures which were obtained by Channel 4 News. The family of a retired engineer who died of acute dehydration have told how staff dumped drinks by his bed without bothering to help him reach them.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2971384/600-patients-die-hunger-thirst-year-Hospital-staff-refuse-help-say-families.html

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‘Forgotten to death’: Almost 600 patients are dying in hospitals each year because of hunger and thirst, figures show, with bereaved relatives saying staff refused to help them eat or drink. (Stock image)

Filed under: Elderly, Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Abuse on a grand scale: Jimmy Savile raped and sexually assaulted victims aged 5 to 75 at 41 NHS hospitals, including 60 at Stoke Mandeville, during a 24 year reign of abuse

It sickens me that a man using his celebrity status was allowed to cover-up his prolific paedophile abuse.  Hospital staff dismissed allegations as they thought he was an ‘asset’ for the hospital. Shame on them all. Joanna

Jimmy Savile was allowed unfettered access to the NHS where he raped and sexually assaulted patients in 41 hospitals during a 24 year reign of abuse, a bombshell report has revealed this morning. The paedophile DJ attacked 60 NHS patients at Stoke Mandeville Hospital alone, where he was given his own private bedroom and 24 hour access to all wards. It is also likely that he had sex with bodies in the Buckinghamshire hospital’s mortuary and is believed to have stolen a glass eye from one body and had it made into a medallion he wore round his neck.

One member of staff who was complained about Savile’s abuse was ‘severely reprimanded’ by her bosses and the complaint was dropped, the report said. The disgraced celebrity, who is now thought to be Britain’s most prolific paedophile abuser, assaulted victims as young as eight years old who were being cared for by the NHS. But despite at least 10 complaints being made nothing was done by senior managers to stop him.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2970049/Abuse-grand-scale-Jimmy-Savile-raped-sexually-assaulted-victims-aged-5-75-41-NHS-hospitals-including-60-Stoke-Mandeville-24-year-reign-abuse.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

The Secretary of State for Health asked former barrister Kate Lampard to produce a ‘lessons learned’ report, drawing on the findings from all published investigations and emerging themes. The report includes 14 recommendations for the NHS, the Department of Health and wider government.

Click on the link to download the Independent report from The Department of Health. KL_lessons_learned_report_FINAL  Jimmy Savile NHS investigations: Lessons learned  

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Fame: Savile raised millions for the Stoke Mandeville, which led to him being seen as an ‘asset’, 

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , ,

Third of NHS staff do not feel secure about raising care concerns, By Will Hazell Nursing Times

Nearly one third of NHS employees do not agree that they would feel secure raising concerns about unsafe clinical practice, according to the 2014 NHS staff survey.

The survey results, published 24th February 2015, paint a picture of increasing pressure on those who work within the health service. Of the survey’s 29 “key findings”, 15 have deteriorated since last year, 11 have improved, one has remained the same, and two cannot be compared due to changes in the questions. Sixty-four per cent of staff surveyed said if a friend or relative needed treatment they would be happy with the standard of care provided by their organisation, a slight decrease on the 65% recorded in 2013.

Picker Institute Europe, which carried out the survey, said the fall was “concerning” because the measure is strongly related to patient experiences of care. Fifty-six per cent of staff said they would recommend their organisation as a place to work, down from 58% in 2013. There was a marked decrease in the number of staff satisfied with their level of pay, from 38% in 2013 to 33% this year, representing the first drop in pay satisfaction since 2011. Only 29% felt there are enough staff for them to do their jobs properly, down one percentage point on the previous year.

Click on the link to read more

Third of NHS staff do not feel secure about raising care concerns

Click on the link to see full survey from Picker Institute Europe

http://www.pickereurope.org/news/picker-institute-europe-responds-nhs-staff-survey-2014/

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, Whistleblowing, , ,

Failure to train enough nurses proves very costly for NHS

Information obtained by the Royal College of Nursing in the East of England shows a 69pc rise in agency nursing expenditure across the region by £20m and a 26pc growth in the number of nurse vacancies across the region. The data shows that many hospitals are struggling to recruit permanent staff and are having to spend increasing amounts of money on temporary staff to look after patients and increasingly looking overseas to recruit nurses. Acute hospitals were asked under the Freedom of Information Act for registered nurse vacancies, nurse agency spend and overseas recruitment during 2014.

RCN director for the eastern region, Karen Webb, said: “The cost of central government’s failure to plan properly for the NHS’s workforce needs is proving cripplingly expensive.  “Through no fault of their own, NHS trusts in our region are scouring the globe looking for nurses and, in the meantime, having to make do with the sticking plaster approach of using expensive agency nurses. “It’s not good for patient care and it is the most inefficient and most expensive way to try and staff wards.”

Click on the link to read more

http://www.eveningnews24.co.uk/news/failure_to_train_enough_nurses_proves_very_costly_for_nhs_1_3969303

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , , ,

‘I was given indigestion pills for tumor in my throat’ “Lucky to be alive”: Bruce Millar

A father who was prescribed indigestion tablets when he had cancer of the oesophagus is campaigning for better awareness of his illness among GPs and the public. Bruce Millar, 57, went to the doctor after having trouble swallowing. He was told it was indigestion and prescribed omeprazole. When his condition did not improve  Mr Millar was referred to surgeon James Gossage at the London Bridge Hospital. He diagnosed cancer of the oesophagus, the disease that killed New Labour strategist Philip Gould.

It is a particularly aggressive form of cancer, but research by Public Health England has found the symptoms are commonly mistaken for heartburn or indigestion. This means death rates are high because many patients are diagnosed at a late stage. Nearly three people a day — 963 in total — died from oesophageal or stomach cancer in London in 2012, and 1,212 were diagnosed.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/health/i-was-given-indigestion-pills-for-tumor-in-my-throat-10068444.html

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“Lucky to be alive”: Bruce Millar had a six-hour operation after his cancer was finally diagnosed

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, ,

New whistle-blowing website for North Staffs NHS staff

It will be good to see the statistics in say 6 months time how many whistleblowing concerns have been logged,  looked into and dealt with. Joanna

MENTAL health NHS staff in North Staffordshire have been given a new website to directly whistle-blow anonymously to their boss. It has been ordered by Combined Healthcare chief executive Caroline Donovan after Stafford Hospital investigator Sir Robert Francis called for workers to be encouraged to speak out freely about bad practice. The site is called “Dear Caroline” which contains a form for worried staff to complete and send securely to her. But she insisted it would not replace her “open-door” inviting any of the trust’s 1,800 workforce to raise concerns face to face.

Mrs Donovan said: “People should feel free to speak out about issues which are getting in the way of us delivering the highest quality care. “It is essential that we continue to improve our culture enabling anyone to challenge without fear of any reprisal.” Any emerging themes will be published on the Trentham lakes-based trust’s full website.

She added: “I realise this may raise difficult and challenging issues which may affect our senior leaders, but it signals a commitment that together we want to improve the culture enabling us to be a great place to be work and receive treatment.”

By D_Blackhurst   The Sentinel

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, Whistleblowing

NHS in crisis: Family of woman left lying on A&E trolley for 16.5 HOURS told to bring in PILLOWS for her

THE family of a woman left on an A&E trolley for 16-and-a-half hours were told to bring in pillows for her, an insider says. The source told the Record: “They were told none were available in the hospital.” He said the woman endured the nightmare wait in accident and emergency at Glasgow’s Victoria Infirmary on Sunday night after suffering a head injury. And he added: “She was told there were no beds in the whole of Glasgow”. The insider also told how another female patient was left on a trolley for 17-and-a-half hours in a room normally used for putting on plaster casts. The report will add to fears of a deepening crisis in Scotland’s A&E units. And it’s the latest in a series of worrying incidents at the Victoria’s casualty unit.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/nhs-crisis-family-woman-left-5218852

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Filed under: A&E, Hospital, NHS, ,

Anguish as Coventry grandfather is denied Parkinson’s ‘wonder-drug’ on NHS

A Coventry grandfather has been denied access to a so-called wonder drug that could help reverse the effects of years of damage that Parkinson’s Disease has ravaged on his body. Edward Reilly, known to his friends as Eamonn, was diagnosed with the progressive disease 16 years ago. He has now been told the NHS will not pay for him to at least try the breakthrough drug Duodopa which could ease his symptoms. Duodopa – which is only prescribed as a ‘last resort’ treatment option where other medications have failed – is said to help control involuntary movements, night-time symptoms and help curtail ‘off’ periods. But last year NHS England announced the drug would not be routinely available on the NHS, meaning doctors have to make long and bureaucratic applications on a case-by-case basis.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.coventrytelegraph.net/news/coventry-news/anguish-coventry-grandfather-denied-parkinsons-8696198

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Have you been denied a drug from the NHS that would help you? This is a one question Patient-Centric Survey to this news article: Please click on the link below, and help us with your comments. Thank you, Joanna

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/denied

 

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized,

3,000 heart attack and stroke victims suffer delays after falling ill at weekends

3,000 heart attack and stroke victims a year are suffering delays being admitted to hospitals after falling ill at weekends, because NHS services are not working round the clock, a new report suggests. Senior doctors last night warned that patients are dying needlessly because of poor access to GPs and out-of-hours services failing to detect emergency cases which should be sent to hospital. New analysis of national NHS data shows a steep drop in the number of cases being admitted to hospital as an emergency at weekends, and a still sharper fall in the number who were sent there by GPs.

The figures suggest that each year, 3,144 patients suffering from heart attacks and strokes end up suffering a delay of at least 24 hours being admitted to hospital, because their case was not identified as an emergency.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/nhs/11423136/3000-heart-attack-and-stroke-victims-suffer-delays-after-falling-ill-at-weekends.html

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NHS lets down patients with appalling standards at weekends, says top doctor

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/nhs/11438668/NHS-lets-down-patients-with-appalling-standards-at-weekends-says-top-doctor.html

Filed under: A&E, Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , , ,

More than 1,000 doctors convicted of crimes from child porn to sexual assault are STILL practising – because banning them could breach their human rights

A growing number of doctors are continuing to practise despite being convicted of serious crimes such as child porn and sexual assault, it can be revealed today. Figures show that more than 1,000 medics have been allowed to keep their jobs after being found guilty of offences – a 10 per cent rise in two years. Other crimes include cruelty to children, domestic violence, drug-trafficking, possessing dangerous weapons and prostitution offences. It is believed many offenders could be treating children.

Campaigners have reacted angrily to the figures, accusing medical chiefs of not doing enough to protect patients.  But bosses at the General Medical Council, which released the data, say it is not always possible to automatically ban convicted doctors because it may breach their human rights.

Please click on the link to read this shocking article, Named and Shamed

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2870383/More-1-000-doctors-convicted-crimes-child-porn-sexual-assault-practising-banning-breach-human-rights.html

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Not struck off: Dr Ashley Sibery (left) has been suspended after being convicted of injecting his wife with heroin, but could in theory return to work when the ban expires. Meanwhile, Dr Hassan Abdulla (middle) has been allowed to carry on working as a psychiatrist despite being convicted of illegally circumcising 41 boys in a ‘non-sterile’ unit. He has been barred from carrying out circumcisions for two years. Dr Nicholas Spicer (right) escaped being struck off in 2010 even though he was described by the General Medical Council as a ‘deviant’ for downloading child-sex stories

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , , ,

Patient found hanging came after four similar deaths at Sunderland hospital

Paige Bell’s death at Cherry Knowle psychiatric unit in Sunderland comes after four previous deaths in similar circumstances in the same NHS trust. Paige, 20, died from oxygen starvation to the brain eight days after she was found hanging in her room on August 6, the inquest heard. She had been taken to the hospital by police after she was pulled from the wrong side of the railings of the Wearmouth Bridge in the early hours that day. Concerns had been raised over observations levels at Cherry Knowle as Paige had self-harmed twice the day she died, coinciding with check-ups from staff

Click on the link to read more

http://www.sunderlandecho.com/news/health/patient-found-hanging-came-after-four-similar-deaths-at-sunderland-hospital-1-7118458

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Filed under: Hospital, Mental Health, NHS, ,

Robots taking over the NHS – Over 80 robots are used in hospitals across Scotland

Machines are taking over the Scottish NHS, according to new figures on the number of robots being used in hospitals. At least 84 robots are now in service in hospitals across Scotland, completing tasks ranging from dispensing drugs to ferrying linen. One health board said that despite installation and maintenance costs, the robots had helped deliver savings of more than £750,000. And while human jobs have been lost, managers insist staff were deployed to areas where a human touch was still appreciated.

NHS Forth Valley is leading the way with a grand total of 40 robots introduced since 2010. Management have spent at least £130,000 on 13 automated guidance vehicles (AGVs) – robots that move waste and linen and transfer food trolleys to wards.

Click on the link to read more

https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/fp/news/scotland/491087/undefined-headline-766/?

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Over 80 robots, many like these, are now in use in hospitals across Scotland

Filed under: Hospital, Uncategorized, , ,

Eileen Chubb – Compassion in Care gives an initial response to Robert Francis QC review of whistle-blowing. “It is a complete betrayal of whistle-blowers”

Eileen Chubb  fighting for Edna’s Law and justice for whistle-blowers. A former care worker who saw vulnerable elderly people abused and tortured and blew the Whistle along with six other brave co-workers

http://www.compassionincare.com/campaigns

Eileen gives an initial responce to Robert Francis QC review of whistle-blowing which was published on 11th February 2015.

Over 1,500 whistle-blowers gave evidence which was submitted to Sir Robert Frances by Eileen, also a petition set up in support of whistle-blowers by change.org where many whistle-blowers signed anonymously (the reasons are obvious) which amounts to evidence of 3,000 whistle-blowers, none of which are shown in the report “as if they did not even exist”.

This is a complete betrayal of whistle-blowers says Eileen and there is not a single thing in this review that would have saved Edna from being abused.

She calls for a full public inquiry into the whistle-blowers who have been failed by PIDA and that only by holding to account those responsible for covering up wrong doing and harming whistle-blowers can future whistle-blowers hope to be protected. “You can not have justice whilst injustice is allowed to stand”. Eileen Chubb.

 

Filed under: Care Homes, Hospital, Whistleblowing, , ,

Why hospital is no place for the unwell – By Michael Deacon

My week on the wards was a soul-crushing experience

For a man of 34, this is no doubt unusual, but until last month, I’d never spent the night in hospital.

Three weeks ago, however, that changed. And since then, I’ve been thinking things over. Previously, I’d assumed the reason I’d never spent the night in hospital was because I’d never been ill. Now I’m wondering whether the reason I’d never been ill was because I’d never spent the night in hospital.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/nhs/11396908/Why-hospital-is-no-place-for-the-unwell.html

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, ,

Health trust shamed for dangerously restraining its patients: Body faces being put in special measures after using technique that can be fatal

A mental health trust where patients have been punished with a dangerous form of restraint faces being put into special measures. Inspectors found serious problems at the body that oversees mental health services in Norfolk and Suffolk. These included patients being held in the face-down prone position and being put in seclusion as a punishment. The prone position involves two or more staff holding a patient face-down on the floor and pinning down their arms, legs and torso. It can result in compression of the chest and airways and can be fatal.

Last April, Lib Dem care minister Norman Lamb announced controls banning its deliberate use on patients. The Norfolk and Suffolk Trust’s secure unit had been told to review its procedures after 38-year-old patient David Bennett died while being held in the prone position for almost 25 minutes in October 1998. A 2003 inquiry into the incident led by Sir John Blofeld found prone position restraints were ‘always dangerous’ and should never be used for more than three minutes.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2938904/Health-trust-shamed-dangerously-restraining-patients-Body-faces-special-measures-using-technique-fatal.html

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The Norfolk and Suffolk Trust’s secure unit was told to review its procedures after 38-year-old patient David Bennett died while being held in the prone position for almost 25 minutes in October 1998

Filed under: Hospital, Mental Health, NHS, ,

111 line increasing pressure on NHS, say leading doctors

The figures were produced by the doctors’ union the BMA, which has had long-standing concerns over NHS 111. Doctors’ leaders say increased referrals mean more pressure on already overstretched GPs and hospitals. NHS England says the 111 service is meeting increasing demand. A spokesman said the proportion of referrals to GPs and emergency services had remained steady despite a surge in calls. But the BMA is concerned that the service is not delivering appropriate advice to some patients and this means some are being incorrectly directed to busy hospitals and GP surgeries.

The BMA looked at the outcomes of calls to NHS 111, which was rolled out in March 2013 to replace the old NHS Direct service. In its final full year of operation in 2011-12, NHS Direct received 4.4 million calls from patients. In comparison, calls to NHS 111 increased year-on-year and in 2014 (up to November) it received and responded to more than 15.4 million calls. Referrals from NHS 111 to A&E increased from just under 400,000 calls in 2013 to over a million in 2014. Similarly, referrals to GPs went up from just under 3 million to 8 million between 2013 and 2014.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-31119807

Have you recently used the NHS 111 number? Were you referred to a GP or A&E department? You can share your experiences by emailing  haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk   If you would be happy to speak further to a BBC journalist, please include a contact telephone number.

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Filed under: GP's, Hospital, , , ,

Getting nurses back on the ward

As staffing ‘crisis’ in NHS deepens Blackpool hospital reveals how it is aiming to get some old hands back in the wards

The boss of Blackpool Victoria Hospital today reassured nurses that action is being taken to improve working conditions as the health trust attempts to persuade those who have left the profession to return. Gary Doherty said Blackpool, like other hospital trusts, had faced challenges to recruit staff during a difficult winter. There is a national shortage of nurses. One leading Lancashire health boss told The Gazette the situation was so severe nurses were now being signed up by hospitals before they had completed their training in a bid to get in first on recruits.

Health chiefs in North Wales have recently announced they are recruiting more than 70 Spanish nurses, amid a staffing crisis gripping the country’s health system.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.blackpoolgazette.co.uk/news/community/community-news/getting-nurses-back-on-the-ward-1-7084752

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Karen Smith who works on the ITU Department at Blackpool Victoria Hospital

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , ,

‘Do Not Resuscitate’ stroke victim is moved from hospital where doctors had ‘given up’ on him and successfully operated on at another unit after Mail on Sunday highlighted his plight

Thank goodness for the quick thinking of this mans family and The Royal Brompton in saving his life who otherwise would have died at the Basildon Hospital. Joanna

A father who doctors ‘gave up’ on following a stroke is now recovering after The Mail on Sunday highlighted his plight. Doctors applied four times to place a ‘do not resuscitate’ order on the medical notes of Paul Scoble, 48, after he suffered the devastating stroke last August. It meant they would not have tried to restart his heart if he had gone into cardiac arrest, and would have left him to die.  He was immobile, breathing through a ventilator and largely unable to communicate. Doctors at Basildon Hospital in Essex told Mr Scoble’s children, Danielle and Leon, to prepare for the worst and asked them to ‘seriously consider’ what their father’s life would be like if he did survive, the siblings said. Besides suffering the stroke, Mr Scoble also had two leaky heart valves. The doctors resisted the idea of carrying out an operation to mend them and said the chances of him surviving it were slim. But Danielle and Leon refused to listen and contacted bosses at other hospitals to ask if they would operate.

After The Mail on Sunday highlighted their plight in November, medics at the Royal Brompton Hospital in London agreed to operate and he was transferred there. Now, Mr Scoble, who runs a family import business with Danielle and Leon, is off a ventilator, eating and talking.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2934788/Do-not-resuscitate-stroke-victim-moved-hospital-doctors-given-successfully-operated-unit-Mail-Sunday-highlighted-plight.html

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Lucky: Paul Scoble’s daughter Danielle (both pictured) refused to give up after doctors applied four times to place a ‘Do Not Resuscitate’ order on his medical notes

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, NHS Blunders, Uncategorized

Patient’s shocking death alone in a public toilet made me question end-of-life care – by Andrew Buckley – A doctor working in a NHS hospital

“Cardiac arrest, public toilets” proclaimed the tinny speaker in the intensive care pager. Clutching the grab bag and defibrillator I headed toward the scene, considering what we were likely to find. There’s an unwritten rule of cardiac arrest: if it’s in a public place, it’s always a syncopal episode, a faint.

A number of responders had arrived before me at the cramped and panicked toilet area and started the well-trodden resuscitation path, delivering CPR to an elderly man we’ll call John. John had not fainted. Evidence of rigor mortis, the stiffening that sets in when the muscles stop receiving oxygen, was already manifest, and his face showed the calm, waxen permanence of death we hospital doctors become so familiar with.

The defibrillator, a machine that allows for rapid assessment of the heart, confirmed the complete absence of electrical activity. A search through his personal effects while chest compressions were ongoing revealed an elegantly handwritten note, written without fear or prejudice, with admirable perspicacity and with a strong undertone of defiance.

Please click on the link to read more

http://www.theguardian.com/healthcare-network/views-from-the-nhs-frontline/2015/jan/28/dignity-death-assisted-suicide-end-life-care?CMP=share_btn_fb

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The letter we found in his pocket while trying to save his life began: “Dear the doctors and nurses of [our hospital]” and went on to neatly summarise a predicament affecting so many in society. Photograph: Alamy

Filed under: Hospital, Uncategorized, , ,

A shocking story eloquently given by Christina Taylor at made at the Scottish Labour Party Conference in Perth 2014 about the care and cover up her mother had.

And Christina is still fighting for the truth

Filed under: Elderly, Hospital, Uncategorized, , ,

Click on the link to track how your hospital is doing near you

The additional pressures of cold weather, norovirus and flu have an impact on all A&E departments across the UK. This tracker allows you to find out how the NHS is doing where you live.

Click on the link to track how your hospital is doing near you

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-25055444

Fresh from the release of the quarterly statistics on Tuesday, there is more bad news about the performance of the NHS in England. The first week of the New Year saw the numbers being seen in four hours drop to 86.7% – a new record low for a single week.It means the last four weeks have been the four worst on record. Attendances are rising, but that does not tell the full story. When you look at other indicators, such as the number of ambulances being delayed, operations being cancelled and delays in discharging patients, the rises being seen are much, much worse. It lends weight to the argument that the NHS has reached a tipping point. What exactly is happening elsewhere in the UK is much harder to tell. There is not the wealth of statistics available, as there is for England, and what is published lags a few months behind. But it is fair to say the pressures are being felt everywhere.  By Nick Triggle, Health correspondent, BBC News

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Filed under: Hospital, Uncategorized, , , ,

50 die under secret 999 policy

 More than 50 patients have died after an NHS trust introduced a secret policy to downgrade 999 calls and not to send ambulances to terminally ill patients. Managers at East of England ambulance trust were accused of “the most cruel form of rationing imaginable” after admitting that 8,000 patients had been affected by the changes.

An internal NHS report discloses that 57 patients died after their calls were downgraded following a decision not to send ambulances to the terminally ill and to those who had given instructions not to resuscitate. It meant that, instead of receiving a response from paramedics in eight minutes, people reporting life-threatening illnesses were given a call back up to 20 minutes later, or had to wait up to an hour for an ambulance.

Click on link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/nhs/11343952/50-die-under-secret-999-policy.html

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Filed under: A&E, Care Homes, Elderly, Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , ,

Diary of a death without dignity – My mothers “Last Six Months” in Hospital by Joanna Slater

January 8th 2008 was the date that my mother passed away in hospital after being in hospital for 6 months. It was 7 years ago, and I still remember as if it were yesterday.

I first started to write these notes purely as a reminder of all the things that happened to my mother throughout the first few weeks when she arrived in hospital for her hip operation.

Each day before I started work I would enter onto my computer all my notes from the previous day. I never thought that I would still be writing six months later. My notes had become an up-to-date diary of my mother and how her condition deteriorated during this terrible, and tragic course of events. It has also allowed me to capture all the memories of our time together, the laughs, the tears, the precious words spoken, and I captured it all.

I published my mother’s notes onto my blog, and then extracts of my mother’s story was published in the Mail on Sunday in June 2011.

I had no idea what would have happened next. I had over one thousand hits on my blog and emails of hundreds of people telling me of their own tragic stories. I knew then that writing my notes was for a reason.

I then self published a book with the full story of my mother’s “Last Six Months” in hospital, including 50 more story’s of the very kind people that had written to me.

Here is the link to the Mail on Sunday in which extracts of my mothers story was shown

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1394300/NHS-hip-operation-mother-died-Daughters-harrowing-account.html

Mum

 

Kay, my very elegant mother

Filed under: Elderly, Hospital, NHS, Uncategorized, , , ,

Why your doctor doesn’t always tell you the truth – Dr Phil Hammond

One reason you trust doctors is because you think we tell you the truth.

But medicine has historically been about disguising, sanitising and spinning the truth. Gently coercing you into the treatment we think is best. All for your own good. We assume you don’t want the whole truth because it isn’t compatible with trust. Generally, it’s not considered sensible to tell you how much we doctors drink, how inexperienced we are or how physically attractive or repugnant we find you. And especially not what your front bottom looks like after childbirth.

When I first walked onto an NHS ward in 1984, many patients were not even told if they had a serious diagnosis such as cancer, multiple sclerosis or dementia. We assumed you weren’t able to contribute, didn’t want to know or that telling you might just make you more anxious and unable to cope. And doctors didn’t have to waste emotion and energy on those difficult conversations about death and disability. But not knowing your diagnosis meant that you couldn’t possibly participate in important decisions about your care, involve your loved ones or plan properly for the future. We pretended to do the worrying for you, and left you to figure it out for yourself.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/active/mens-health/11316370/Why-your-doctor-doesnt-always-tell-you-the-truth.html

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We assume you don’t want the whole truth because it isn’t compatible with trust’ Photo: Alamy

Filed under: GP's, Hospital, Uncategorized,

Pensioner was found dehydrated and desperately groping for food because nurses didn’t realise she was almost totally blind

This article makes me feel sick to the stomach, also the photo of Margaret slumped over the table reminds me of the photo I took of my mother in hospital. Joanna

A retired teacher was found dehydrated and groping for food in hospital because nurses failed to realise she was virtually blind, her horrified daughter has said. Good Hope Hospital in Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands, has apologised for ‘fundamental failings’ in its care of 82-year-old Margaret Jones after she was admitted following a fall in June.  Staff were told the pensioner’s eyes could only pick out light and dark after suffering almost total blindness triggered by arteriosclerosis, a hardening of the arteries which restricts blood flow. But when her daughter Rosalind Waite-Jones re-visited her on June 27 – just ten days after she was admitted – she discovered her mother dishevelled, dehydrated and covered in food. It was the result of Mrs Jones desperately groping for items she could not see.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2896211/Pensioner-dehydrated-desperately-groping-food-nurses-didn-t-realise-totally-blind.html

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Desperation: The pensioner, who can only see shades of light and dark, with her head in her hands

Filed under: Elderly, Hospital, Uncategorized

‘Clarity needed’ over resuscitation orders

Clearer guidance is needed about when “do not resuscitate” orders can be placed on patients’ medical records, the Court of Appeal investigating an unlawful case has heard.
Mrs Tracey’s daughter, Kate Masters, 47, said: “The situation really has to change so that no other families are left like mine are.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-27247764

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, , ,

Three NHS surgeons named are banned but still working say The Telegraph

Three NHS surgeons have been banned from using a keyhole technique to operate on cancer patients after the procedure led to at least five deaths, The Telegraph has learnt, but despite the ban, all three surgeons are still being allowed to carry out a wide range of other surgical procedures at NHS hospitals run by the trust. They are also working privately

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/10806560/Families-angry-surgeons-still-working-for-NHS-despite-deaths-of-five-patients.html

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, , , ,

Protecting Our Parents

I am in the prime of my life, and getting older each day as we all are. I’m trying to imagine myself at 80 years old plus. Who knows if I will have all my faculties. Will I be mobile? Will I still have my memory? Will I have to be dependent on others? Will I have a home? This program Protecting our Parents was just too painful for words as to what is happening to our elderly folk.

This BBC program which was shown on 1st May looks coolly and compassionately at issues (or not) that an ageing population raises for our care systems.

http://www.radiotimes.com/episode/cvvgd2/protecting-our-parents–series-1—3-nowhere-to-go

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Filed under: Care Homes, Hospital, ,

NHS recruiting 50 doctors from India over Skype to plug desperate A&E shortages

The NHS is recruiting 50 doctors directly from India in a bid to fill desperate staffing gaps in Britain’s A&E departments.
Around 150 candidates, some of whom have not yet taken final exams in emergency medicine, will be interviewed in New Delhi over Skype next week and begin a four-year spell in Britain this summer.
Health bosses insist the drastic measure, which will cost the NHS £3,120 per doctor in flights, visas, registration and access to training tools, is the only way to keep emergency wards safely staffed.

Some A&E training courses in Britain have been more than half empty with 135 vacancies across the board this year.
One campaigner criticised the fact not all candidates will have to complete the Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB) test – designed to check they have the right skills and knowledge to work in Britain.

Click on link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2614011/NHS-recruiting-50-doctors-India-Skype-plug-desperate-A-E-shortages.html#ixzz304fPeMZi

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, , ,

NHS Direct is Now Closed

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS,

Hospital apologises to 38 families for appalling care that saw a patient starve to death

An NHS hospital has apologised to 38 families after a patient starved to death and it left other dying people screaming in pain.

Alexandra Hospital in Redditch is writing to 38 families after a massive legal action that exposed years of bad practice, ranging from nurses taunting patients to leaving an elderly woman unwashed for 11 weeks.

Read more: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/heal-our-hospitals/9762987/Hospital-apologises-to-38-families-for-appalling-care-that-saw-a-patient-starve-to-death.html

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, , , , , ,

Hunger striker is backing NHS whistleblowers

02 October 2012 – A leading neuropsychologist is staging a hunger strike in protest at the treatment of NHS whistleblowers.

Dr Narinder Kapur began his protest outside the Department of Health in Whitehall yesterday, claiming not enough is being done to protect staff who bring scandals to light.

Read more:  http://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/hunger-striker-is-backing-nhs-whistleblowers-8193816.html

Filed under: Hospital, NHS

London 2012 opening ceremony: The night that set back NHS reform for years

The rest of the world may have been perplexed, but it was 20 minutes that made Britain feel better about itself. The dancing doctors, the nurses in their old-fashioned uniforms, the cute children bouncing on 300 luminous beds that spelt out those sacred three letters: NHS.

What else could have symbolised Britain at its best than Danny Boyle’s tribute to the health service in his breathtaking Olympic opening ceremony?

Amid the dark satanic mills and pogoing punks, here was a special moment to give thanks and praise to something British that we deem the envy of the world.

After all, our doctors are deities and the National Health Service is sacrosanct — the one arm of the State beyond criticism. There was even a salute to Great Ormond Street Hospital, which has a unique place in the nation’s affections.

So who could quibble with Danny Boyle’s declamation after his opening night triumph that everyone in Britain loves the NHS? ‘It is something that is very dear to people’s hearts,’ he said. ‘It is an amazing thing to celebrate.’

If only, in my view, that were true.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-2183440/London-2012-opening-ceremony-The-night-set-NHS-reform-years.html#ixzz22i1sbBFe

Filed under: Hospital, NHS, ,

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