STRENGTH IN NUMBERS

Strength in Numbers dedicated to my late mother Kay

Heart patients’ lives ‘at risk as NHS 111 hotline won’t send ambulances’ due to shortage in paramedics

  •  Shortage of paramedics means ambulances are not being dispatched
  •  Undercover reporter wasn’t able to send help to a man with chest pain
  •  Mentor told trainee staff: ‘Everyone in this room has killed someone’
  • South Central Ambulance Service (SCAS) has announced investigation  

Patients’ lives are being put at risk by the NHS 111 helpline because call- handlers are being told not to dispatch ambulances, it was claimed last night. One call-centre mentor chillingly told trainee staff that ‘everyone in this room has killed someone’, an undercover investigation found. Patients are being denied ambulances even if they are suffering the symptoms of a heart attack, the Daily Telegraph investigation reported.  The NHS 111 helpline was launched in 2013 to provide round-the-clock advice to the public as an alternative to the former advice line NHS Direct, which was run by medically-qualified staff. The new helpline was intended to prevent unnecessary visits to A&E.

Staff on the 111helpline have previously been criticised for merely asking callers questions as guided by computer algorithms – and sending too many tohospital as a result.  Call-handlers working on the service are expected to dispatch the emergency services if patients describe symptoms of serious illnesses. However, they are now said to be under pressure not to send out ambulances at certain times due to a shortage of paramedics and a backlog of requests.

An undercover reporter spent seven weeks working on the 111 helpline – which has had numerous problems since its launch – in a call centre in Bicester, Oxford.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3145355/Heart-patients-lives-risk-NHS-111-hotline-won-t-send-ambulances-shortage-paramedics.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

265C3F7600000578-0-image-a-102_1435711712956

Filed under: A&E, Hospital, NHS, , , ,

Baby’s death could have been avoided but NHS 111 staff ‘were working from a script because they are not skilled professionals’

  • William Mead died after developing an abscess in his left lung at 12 months
  • Mother phoned NHS out-of-hours 111 service the night before he died
  • Staff missed chance to save the infant as they read from script
  • Had he been admitted to hospital he could have been saved
  • Coroner records verdict that his death was due to natural causes

A baby died after NHS 111 staff working from a script missed the chance to save the seriously ill infant, an inquest heard. William Mead died the day after a helpline operator, with no medical training, advised his mother to give him plenty of fluids, Calpol and Ibuprofen. The 12-month-old had developed an abscess in his left lung caused by the bacterial infection streptococcus A. But had the out-of-hours service advised that the child be admitted immediately to hospital he could still be alive today, the hearing was told.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3120129/Baby-s-death-avoided-NHS-111-staff-working-script-not-skilled-professionals.html

29894DD600000578-0-image-a-12_1434033002635

William Mead was just 12 months old when he died after NHS 111 staff working from a script missed a chance to save him

Filed under: NHS Blunders, , ,

Exclusive: NHS 111 providers ordered to appoint GPs to redirect cases towards primary care

Exclusive All NHS 111 providers have been told to ensure they have GPs available in call centres or available to give clinical advice at peak times to reduce the burden on ambulance services and redirect cases towards primary care.

In a letter to NHS 111 commissioners and obtained by Pulse, NHS England’s national director of commissioning operations Dame Barbara Hakin said that the plans for GP presence in call centres or available to provide clinical advice should be in place ‘as soon as possible’ to minimise the burden on ambulance services suffering ‘as soon as possible’. Dame Barbara said that pilots of GPs working in call centres had successfully led to ‘diversion to primary care, especially GP out of hours’, as well as some diversion to A&E. Although the letter says increased GP input into NHS 111 is a short-term measure, Pulse understands that NHS England is set to include the appointment of GPs as part of its final directions for commissioners procuring new contracts.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/commissioning/commissioning-topics/urgent-care/nhs-111-providers-ordered-to-appoint-gps-to-redirect-cases-towards-primary-care/20009184.article#.VOMKI_msXuI

11786_nhs-111-logo

 

Filed under: GP's, NHS, , ,

Britain’s A&E units sent into meltdown as NHS 111 helpline sends 6,000 extra callers a week

The NHS 111 phone helpline has plunged accident and emergency units into chaos by sending 6,000 extra callers a WEEK for walk-in hospital treatment. The number of people who were ­advised to go to A&E in the 2013-14 ­financial year was 526,500, the Government revealed. But in eight months to November last year – before this winter’s crisis – the figure had ballooned to 515,500, an ­average extra 6,000 a week. The 111 ­helpline replaced the popular NHS Direct in 2010 and in its first eight months only 7,400 people were told to go to A&E, writes Nigel Nelson in the Sunday People. Doctors blame unqualified 111 call handlers for tipping A&Es into ­meltdown. NHS Direct call lines had been manned by medically qualified staff. Earlier this month every NHS trust in England failed to meet its emergency care targets. In the lead-up to Christmas, more than 400,000 ­patients had to wait longer than the target four hours to be seen.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/britains-ae-units-sent-meltdown-4998228

I131228_131147_783337oTextCS_53688572

Chaotic: Doctors say call handlers are not qualified to decide whether people require A&E treatment

Filed under: A&E, Uncategorized, ,

Figures expose ambulance delays in life and death calls

Thousands of patients suffering life-threatening emergencies are waiting longer for ambulances across the country.
The average waiting time for the most urgent 999 calls has lengthened in every part in the country in the past three years, according to official statistics, with patients waiting 60 per cent longer for paramedics in some areas.
Last night patients’ groups said the growing delays were “unacceptable”, while medical experts said they were risking the lives of those suffering emergencies such as strokes and heart attacks.

Click on the link to read more
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/10962298/Figures-expose-ambulance-delays-in-life-and-death-calls.html

ambulance_2972314b

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , ,

Blog views to date

  • 98,595 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to The Last Six Months and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,429 other followers

Helpful Pages, Templates etc

Recent Posts

Pages