STRENGTH IN NUMBERS

Strength in Numbers dedicated to my late mother Kay

Good care homes will be preserve of rich unless more funding given – ITV Report

High quality care will only be available to those who can afford it unless proper funding is offered to pay staff the new national living wage, a charity has warned.

Around half of the country’s care home staff – some 300,000 people – will be eligible for a pay rise when the new minimum rate of £7.20 an hour comes in next April. But a study by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation found that this will cost the industry – already struggling beneath the weight of government cost-cutting and an ageing population – an extra £387 million a year. Care homes in areas with a large number of council-funded positions will be put at particular risk, the report warned. Joseph Rowntree Foundation chief executive Julia Unwin said the impact could be “devastating”.

‘The new national living wage is a welcome step towards a higher pay economy with lower need for welfare, and is good news for those working in traditional low-pay sectors, such as care. However, care homes are already under financial pressure and if proper funding is not provided to help with these additional costs, the Government risks creating a two-tier care home system where good care is only available to those who can pay for it. This would be devastating for those who are unable to meet these costs themselves, and would have an impact on the wider economy.

While many local authorities will struggle to meet higher wage costs without further investment, many care providers with self-funded residents will find that their current business plans allow them to absorb the cost.’

– JULIA UNWIN, JOSEPH ROWNTREE FOUNDATION CHIEF EXECUTIVE

 

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Filed under: Care Homes, ,

NHS needs more funding this year or patient care could suffer, say health experts

The NHS needs another funding boost this year or patient care could suffer, health experts have said, in the latest bleak assessment of the health service finances.

Researchers at the King’s Fund found that an unprecedented nine out of 10 hospitals in England are predicting an end-of-year deficit, with estimates suggesting that NHS providers could go £2bn into the red.

The stark warning from the respected think tank, which comes ahead of next week’s Budget, also undermines some of the Government’s flagship NHS pledges, stating that an £8bn funding increase for the NHS in England by 2020 – announced before the election – is a bare minimum and cannot pay for David Cameron’s promise of seven-day working across the health service.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/nhs-needs-more-funding-this-year-or-patient-care-could-suffer-say-health-experts-10361673.html

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Filed under: Hospital, NHS, , ,

NHS should stop buying drugs which cost more than £13,000, researchers say

Cutting funding on drugs would stop people with terminal illnesses having the chance to live that much longer, and closing the door on most new treatments. Lets hope it never comes to that. Joanna

 The NHS should not spend more than £13,000 a year on drugs for individuals because higher spending does “more harm than good” by diverting funds from larger groups of patients, economists have said. A study by the Centre of Health Economics, at the University of York, says health spending on costly drugs, especially those which prolong the lives of terminally-ill cancer patients, is not an effective use of NHS resources, and says costs should be capped much lower. But health watchdogs last night hit out at the research, and said following the advice would mean “closing the door” on the majority of new drugs for patients. Under current NHS guidance, the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence rarely backs drugs which cost more than around £40,000 a year, but cancer drugs which cost more can be funded via a special NHS Cancer Drugs Fund.

It means breast cancer drugs such as Kadcyla, which costs around £90,000 a year, and can extend life by an average of six months, in those for whom it is suitable, are funded by the NHS, despite their high costs.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/11421013/NHS-should-stop-buying-drugs-which-cost-more-than-13000-researchers-say.html

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Debate about which drugs the NHS should fund has been hotly debated  Photo: Alamy 

Filed under: NHS, , , ,

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