STRENGTH IN NUMBERS

Strength in Numbers dedicated to my late mother Kay

Prostate cancer could be ‘transformed from killer disease to chronic illness’ for thousands of men after NHS give green light to promising drug

  • Experts say men who took the drug had 29% better chance of survival
  • Trials found drug delayed need for chemotherapy by average of 17 months 
  • Drug costs £2,734 a month and had previously been refused by NICE

Thousands of men are to benefit from a prostate cancer drug which delays the need for gruelling chemotherapy. Officials at NICE – the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence – have reversed their previous decision and recommended that enzalutamide be funded on the NHS. An estimated 5,500 men in England and Wales each year are expected to benefit from use of the drug, which slashes the risk of prostate cancer progressing. Clinical trials have shown that the treatment delays the need for chemotherapy by an average 17 months, substantially increasing quality of life for patients.

Men who took the drug at this stage also had a 29 per cent better overall chance of survival. Doctors say the treatment, which was developed by British scientists, has the potential to transform prostate cancer from a killer disease unto a chronic illness. Enzalutamide is already available if chemotherapy has failed – but cancer charities have repeatedly insisted that the drug, which is also called Xtandi, will benefit even more men if it is used before chemotherapy. Yet officials at NICE published a draft decision in June indicating it would not be approved for routine use before chemotherapy.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3356254/Prostate-cancer-transformed-killer-disease-chronic-illness-thousands-men-NHS-green-light-promising-drug.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

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The drug was found to delay the need for chemotherapy in patients for an average 17 months, increasing the quality of life for patients. (The prostate is pictured, orange, below the bladder)

Filed under: Cancer, , , ,

NHS trials for cancer sniffer dogs

The NHS has given the go-ahead for trials involving specially trained dogs capable of sniffing out prostate cancer.

The charity Medical Detection Dogs has gained approval from Milton Keynes University Hospital for further trials, after an initial study showed specially trained dogs can detect prostate tumours in urine in 93% of cases.

It is hoped canine testing could help show up inaccuracies in the traditional Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) test, used to determine if men need a biopsy. The test has a high “false positive” rate, and many men are unnecessarily referred for the invasive procedure. Iqbal Anjum, a consultant urologist at the hospital, said the study was “an extremely exciting prospect”.

Click on the link to read more

https://www.onmedica.com/newsarticle.aspx?id=a0e08c76-a170-40fb-bf2e-9c104b14f5da

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Filed under: Cancer, NHS, , ,

NHS will not offer ‘innovative’ drug to treat prostate cancer

Cancer charities are disappointed with health officials who have deemed a new and ‘innovative’ drug to treat advanced prostate cancer is not cost-effective for the NHS.

Enzalutamide is currently available on the Cancer Drugs Fund in England, which enables patients to access drugs that would not otherwise have been routinely available from the NHS. But the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) has published draft guidance in which it says the drug has not been proven to work well enough for the price the NHS must pay for it.

The drug, also called Xtandi, is licensed to treat people with prostate cancer that has spread to other parts of the body who have not yet had chemotherapy, and in whom treatments to lower the amount of male sex hormones – which normally stop the cancer from growing and spreading – no longer work.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.itv.com/news/2015-06-11/nhs-will-not-offer-innovative-drug-to-treat-prostate-cancer/

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Filed under: Cancer, , , , ,

Dogs can sniff out prostate cancer in men 98% of the time

Tests showed that a man’s best friend can detect the deadly disease in 98 per cent of cases after smelling their urine.  Experts have hailed the findings as “spectacular” and called for more support for the “tested, time-old technology.” Dr Claire Guest, co-founder of the Buckinghamshire charity Medical Detection Dogs, said research had found a 93 per cent reliability rate when detecting bladder and prostate cancer.  She said: “These results are spectacular. They offer us further proof that dogs have the ability to detect human cancer. “It is particularly exciting that we have such a high success rate in the detection of prostate cancer, for which the existing tests are woefully inadequate.”

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK, with more than 40,000 cases diagnosed every year.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/569831/Dogs-sniff-out-prostate-cancer

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Filed under: Cancer, , ,

Prostate cancer – To a friend who’s worrying right now but needs to know he’s not alone

Please look and share Daniel Sencier’s website on Prostate Cancer. So many men are suffering in silence…

“I’ve just found that a friend has been examined by his doctor and consultant, and is now going for a biopsy next week. I want to write to him here because so many other men will be in his position right now, wondering what the next few months will hold, and this letter may benefit them”.

Please click on Daniel’s blog

http://danielsencier.blogspot.co.uk/2014/10/to-friend-whos-worrying-right-now-but.html?spref=fb

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Filed under: Uncategorized,

Prostate cancer drug ruling a ‘fiasco’, says charity

Abiraterone is already given to patients at the end-of-life after chemotherapy as it gives patients an extra few months.
But the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence said it was not cost-effective to offer it earlier.
It said while the drug improved quality of life, it was unclear whether it had the same impact on life expectancy.
This was due to problems with the research data, NICE said, claiming the trial was finished early – something disputed by the drug’s makers Janssen.
‘Vital opportunity’
Instead, patients will have to rely on their doctors applying to the Cancer Drugs Fund, a special pot set aside for cancer drugs not routinely available on the NHS.
Some 3,000 patients have done this in the last year, but that fund is due to end in 2016.
Owen Sharp, chief executive of Prostate Cancer UK, the largest men’s health charity, said the whole process was “a fiasco”.
Jump media playerMedia player helpOut of media player. Press enter to return or tab to continue.
Cancer patient Mike Sawkins: “I’m privileged to be on this expensive drug”
He criticised NICE’s inflexibility and the drug company’s results-gathering process, saying: “This decision is a kick in the teeth for men with advanced prostate cancer.

Click on the link to see video and read more
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-28785250

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Filed under: Uncategorized, , , ,

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