STRENGTH IN NUMBERS

Strength in Numbers dedicated to my late mother Kay

Inadequate staffing implicated in stillbirths and neonatal death. By Steve Ford, News Editor for Nursing Times

Staffing and workload issues have been identified as a major factor in stillbirths and neonatal deaths during labour, following a national review.

The MBRRACE-UK report looked at the quality of care for stillbirths and neonatal deaths of babies born at term who were alive at the onset of labour and not affected by a major congenital anomaly.

This type of death occurred in 225 pregnancies in the UK in 2015 and represents about 5% of perinatal deaths overall, noted the report authors from the University of Oxford.

Overall, they found that stillbirth and neonatal deaths have more than halved in the UK from 0.62 to 0.28 per 1,000 total births since 1993, representing a fall of around 220 intrapartum deaths per year.

However, despite the fall in the mortality rate, such deaths remain an important group for concern, highlighted the researchers.

They said this was not least because, in the vast majority, the mother was directly receiving maternity care when the baby died or when the event occurred that led to the baby’s death.

To investigate further, the analysis focused on 78 of the 2015 cases to identify potentially avoidable failures of care during labour, delivery and any resuscitation, that may have caused the death.

The care provided for the mothers and babies was reviewed in detail against national guidelines and standards by a panel of clinicians, including midwives, bereavement midwives and neonatal nurses.

Click on the link to read in full

Inadequate staffing implicated in stillbirths and neonatal death

3037497_baby__scan__pregnant__maternity__mother

 

Filed under: Hospital, NHS,

Mother who released this desperately poignant picture of daughter who hospital insisted was stillborn launches drive for coroners to probe every full-term baby’s death in… Clara’s law

  • A study showed Britain has the highest stillbirth rate among 35 rich nations
  • Some 3,300 babies are stillborn each year, 1,000 of which are full term
  • Parents believe hospitals can falsify records to avoid damaging inquests 
  • Caroline Tully, whose daughter Clara was still born wants inquests for all 

Babies are dying needlessly in labour because stillbirths are not being properly investigated, campaigners claim. And hospitals are failing to learn vital lessons from the ‘catastrophic’ deaths, say experts.

Britain has the third highest rate of stillbirth among 35 rich nations, according to a study in The Lancet, with around 3,300 a year. Some 1,000 are at full term. Currently hospitals investigate stillbirths themselves – even if the baby dies just minutes before delivery. But parents say they can falsely record babies as stillborn to avoid potentially damaging inquests. Bereaved parents, legal experts and MPs last night said stillbirths occurring at delivery had to be reported to a coroner if future deaths were to be avoided.

Caroline Tully, who fought for an inquest after being told her daughter Clara was stillborn, said: ‘It doesn’t seem right that a full-term baby can be alive one minute, then die in labour, and there’s no external investigation.’ She wants a ‘Clara’s Law’ to make it a legal requirement for all deaths of full-term babies in labour to be reported to the coroner.

Click on the link to read more

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3259132/Mother-released-desperately-poignant-picture-daughter-hospital-insisted-stillborn-launches-drive-coroners-probe-term-baby-s-death-Clara-s-law.html#article-3259132

 

Clara Tully-Hardman - daughter of Caroline Tully who was still born after a blunder at Warwickshire hospital. ***INTERNET IMAGE TAKEN FROM www.rcog.org.uk***

Caroline Tully fought for an inquest for her daughter, Clara, pictured, who was stillborn

 

Filed under: Uncategorized, ,

Caroline Tully shares the story of her daughter Clara, who died shortly after birth and please sign the petition

Please sign the petition

Coroners Inquests into Stillbirths where signs of life are present during labour

https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/104893

Read Caroline’s story

In March 2014, at 37+1, I went into labour with our first daughter Clara. My waters didn’t break but we waited until my contractions were 2 minutes apart before setting off to the hospital. On arrival basic checks were carried out and we were advised to go home as labour with your first baby can take up to 24 hours. My daughter’s heartbeat was listened to once.

We were concerned and recorded the increasing frequency and length of each contraction ourselves. We did not feel we were listened to. We said that we didn’t want to be sent home but the midwife was determined she knew best and it took us 25 minutes to struggle back to the car. Within an hour we were back at the hospital and our daughter was born within minutes. There was no sound from Clara after she was born and emergency procedures were then followed. We were told after 30 minutes that resuscitation was unsuccessful and that Clara had been stillborn.

Click on the link to read more

https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/guidelines-research-services/audit-quality-improvement/each-baby-counts/claras-story/

clara-tully-hardman Clara Tully-Hardman

Filed under: Hospital, ,

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